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I see that to properly park a motorcycle on a street, you are supposed to park with the rear tire backed against the curb. I don't have a problem with that, I was just wondering why.

Yes, I am a noob rider :eek:
 

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I don't "Know", but I will give you my opinions why.

1. Takes up less space.
2. Front end pointed in the direction needing to go.
3. If pointed uphill, you can leave in neutral and it won't roll off.

I am sure there are more, but that is what first comes to mind.
 

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My opinion, don't know if it's correct.

Most streets crown in the center for water shed. If you park with your front tire against the curb, you will have to try and pull your bike backwards, uphill, by the bars. If you have a light bike, no big deal but still a pain. The big bikes, near impossible.

When you back in, the bike rolls down hill into the spot with no effort, then when you leave it is all motor that is getting you out of the hole that you would be stuck in. Make sense?
 

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It's a safety thing. In addition to keeping the bike from rolling on a hill, making it easier to pull away and see oncoming traffic, it also puts the kickstand downhill, making it harder for the bike to tip over the wrong way. Not impossible, just harder. Instead of doing 90 degrees against the curb like I see a lot, I like to part it at about a 45 degrees. That has the back wheel against the curb and the front wheel about six to eight feet from the curb pointing towards the middle of the street.
 

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+1 to keeping the kickstand downhill. Make sure the weight of the bike is pushing BACKWARDS, never FORWARDS. I myself have witnessed that ending badly. Actually at a motorcycle dealer, with several bikes pointed down a very slight hill and in neutral. Two or three finally rolled forward and came to rest with a bang on their sides before someone came out and moved them. They would roll forward just a little and the kickstand would fold up, down they went. If they rolled the other way, they'd be dragging the kickstand with them, scraping it across the asphalt, which could potentially stop the bike before it gets into too much trouble.

Also, while your transmission will hold the bike at a stop in gear (I never leave it in neutral; always in gear), it's best to not force it to as things can slip or even fail! The closest you can get to being able to park the bike and leave it in neutral safety (even if you actually leave it in gear) the better. Back tire up against a curb will often accomplish that, as the weight of the bike sitting still isn't usually enough to push it up over the curb.

The final reason, is where it'll roll. Lets say it pops out of gear, it's on a hill. You have the bike facing uphill, but the back tire is away from the curb and the front tire is against the curb. It rolls back, skidding and dragging the sidestand; right into traffic. Could cause a serious accident. If it's facing the curb, worst case scenario is it just kind of scuttles and skids into a parked car, or just falls over. That sucks; but it's way better than it skidding out in front of a car, a car which plows into it, which claims it was your fault because the bike was improperly parked and the court agrees with them! Explain to your insurance company how your parked bike did $10,000 in damage!

So; always always always park it facing up the hill. And keep it 'pointed' away from traffic (which means pointing it TOWARDS traffic if it's facing uphill, as then, it'll roll backwards).

I'll second the comment about using the motor, not your legs to get out of a parking spot. Whenever possible, I back my bike in so I don't have to push back with my legs. In fact often I will locate a spot where I can 'roll it back' down a hill (like an ever so slightly sloped side of the parking lot), and then just pull out using the engine. Why work harder when you can work smarter!
 

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+1 to keeping the kickstand downhill. Make sure the weight of the bike is pushing BACKWARDS, never FORWARDS. I myself have witnessed that ending badly. Actually at a motorcycle dealer, with several bikes pointed down a very slight hill and in neutral. Two or three finally rolled forward and came to rest with a bang on their sides before someone came out and moved them. They would roll forward just a little and the kickstand would fold up, down they went. If they rolled the other way, they'd be dragging the kickstand with them, scraping it across the asphalt, which could potentially stop the bike before it gets into too much trouble.

Also, while your transmission will hold the bike at a stop in gear (I never leave it in neutral; always in gear), it's best to not force it to as things can slip or even fail! The closest you can get to being able to park the bike and leave it in neutral safety (even if you actually leave it in gear) the better. Back tire up against a curb will often accomplish that, as the weight of the bike sitting still isn't usually enough to push it up over the curb.

The final reason, is where it'll roll. Lets say it pops out of gear, it's on a hill. You have the bike facing uphill, but the back tire is away from the curb and the front tire is against the curb. It rolls back, skidding and dragging the sidestand; right into traffic. Could cause a serious accident. If it's facing the curb, worst case scenario is it just kind of scuttles and skids into a parked car, or just falls over. That sucks; but it's way better than it skidding out in front of a car, a car which plows into it, which claims it was your fault because the bike was improperly parked and the court agrees with them! Explain to your insurance company how your parked bike did $10,000 in damage!

So; always always always park it facing up the hill. And keep it 'pointed' away from traffic (which means pointing it TOWARDS traffic if it's facing uphill, as then, it'll roll backwards).

I'll second the comment about using the motor, not your legs to get out of a parking spot. Whenever possible, I back my bike in so I don't have to push back with my legs. In fact often I will locate a spot where I can 'roll it back' down a hill (like an ever so slightly sloped side of the parking lot), and then just pull out using the engine. Why work harder when you can work smarter!
Done this on my 1500 Classic the first time I took it out. I was used to my little 650 Honda Nighthawk and could man handle it where ever and not think about it. After I had to get help with the 1500, I started thinking how I was going to leave before I parked.
 

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+1 to keeping the kickstand downhill. Make sure the weight of the bike is pushing BACKWARDS, never FORWARDS. I myself have witnessed that ending badly. Actually at a motorcycle dealer, with several bikes pointed down a very slight hill and in neutral. Two or three finally rolled forward and came to rest with a bang on their sides before someone came out and moved them. They would roll forward just a little and the kickstand would fold up, down they went. If they rolled the other way, they'd be dragging the kickstand with them, scraping it across the asphalt, which could potentially stop the bike before it gets into too much trouble.

Also, while your transmission will hold the bike at a stop in gear (I never leave it in neutral; always in gear), it's best to not force it to as things can slip or even fail! The closest you can get to being able to park the bike and leave it in neutral safety (even if you actually leave it in gear) the better. Back tire up against a curb will often accomplish that, as the weight of the bike sitting still isn't usually enough to push it up over the curb.

The final reason, is where it'll roll. Lets say it pops out of gear, it's on a hill. You have the bike facing uphill, but the back tire is away from the curb and the front tire is against the curb. It rolls back, skidding and dragging the sidestand; right into traffic. Could cause a serious accident. If it's facing the curb, worst case scenario is it just kind of scuttles and skids into a parked car, or just falls over. That sucks; but it's way better than it skidding out in front of a car, a car which plows into it, which claims it was your fault because the bike was improperly parked and the court agrees with them! Explain to your insurance company how your parked bike did $10,000 in damage!

So; always always always park it facing up the hill. And keep it 'pointed' away from traffic (which means pointing it TOWARDS traffic if it's facing uphill, as then, it'll roll backwards).

I'll second the comment about using the motor, not your legs to get out of a parking spot. Whenever possible, I back my bike in so I don't have to push back with my legs. In fact often I will locate a spot where I can 'roll it back' down a hill (like an ever so slightly sloped side of the parking lot), and then just pull out using the engine. Why work harder when you can work smarter!
You made a very good point that got me thinking. I always park put it in neutral, kill engine and walk away, leaving it in neutral. Never even dawned on me until just now. Of course you should leave it in gear. So from now on it's going to be Park, Kill Switch, verify it's in gear, pull key and go. (If I remember to pull the key that is? LOL) Thanks!
 

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Great post and question, actually. It's something I'm going to have to be more mindful of after getting my V2K. It only took one time of parking it here beside the house where the sidewalk had about a 1.5" bump to get up to the driveway... I had to get some help because I couldn't get enough grip with my feet on the ground to bounce it up that little bump. I immediately dug up a small bit and sloped it so that it wasn't a tiny wall. I don't want to wind up begging for help in a WalMart parking lot!! (so much for the bad-a$$-biker guy!) Thanks for asking, and the responses. I'll be more mindful!
 

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Great post and question, actually. It's something I'm going to have to be more mindful of after getting my V2K. It only took one time of parking it here beside the house where the sidewalk had about a 1.5" bump to get up to the driveway... I had to get some help because I couldn't get enough grip with my feet on the ground to bounce it up that little bump. I immediately dug up a small bit and sloped it so that it wasn't a tiny wall. I don't want to wind up begging for help in a WalMart parking lot!! (so much for the bad-a$$-biker guy!) Thanks for asking, and the responses. I'll be more mindful!
Oh yeah those V2Ks are heavy. I have caught myself slamming back in the seat and then working the break to walk it back a few times because I did not realize the ground was as sloped as much as it is. It wide enough you can get too good of grip on the ground to push it back either. Been there, don't want to be there again.
 

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Oh yeah those V2Ks are heavy. I have caught myself slamming back in the seat and then working the break to walk it back a few times because I did not realize the ground was as sloped as much as it is. It wide enough you can get too good of grip on the ground to push it back either. Been there, don't want to be there again.
This is likely to threadjack, so I'll apologize up front, but this is where I discovered that the left grip was sliding off... Are those supposed to be glued? It's an aftermarket grip that was on it when I got it. *sorry again* Of all the bikes I've owned and used, I've never replaced a grip.
 

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You made a very good point that got me thinking. I always park put it in neutral, kill engine and walk away, leaving it in neutral. Never even dawned on me until just now. Of course you should leave it in gear. So from now on it's going to be Park, Kill Switch, verify it's in gear, pull key and go. (If I remember to pull the key that is? LOL) Thanks!
Guess it's just a habit from driving cars with a manual transmission. I always put it in gear and pull the e-brake. One day, one is bound to fail. Likewise with the bike, hopefully it won't go anywhere in neutral. But anything could happen, so the transmission is a nice "backup".

I forget my key now and then, too. Usually don't; but I certainly have! I also found out that you can turn the key on the 900 'back' to a "park" position that leaves the tail light on and the rear lights as running lights on; AND you can remove the key! So, you could walk away from the bike, key in your pocket, thinking you turned it off- and drain the battery. (Luckily, the day I found this out, it still started- barely.)
 

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This is likely to threadjack, so I'll apologize up front, but this is where I discovered that the left grip was sliding off... Are those supposed to be glued? It's an aftermarket grip that was on it when I got it. *sorry again* Of all the bikes I've owned and used, I've never replaced a grip.
Yes, they should be glued. Some people say hair spray works really well! I've always just had the stock grips (work fine for me). Only advice I have is before re-gluing, pull the grip off and clean the handlebar really really well.

Watched a mechanic drop a Harley Ultra Classic at the dealer getting recall work done on my Kawasaki. He tried to pick it up while standing next to it, intending to walk the bike over somewhere; and the grip slipped right off and down it went. Then he said "Dang it's a good thing he's trading it in..."
 

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The V2K factory grips thread on (I think, never had mine off). I believe the cap on the end is a bolt that keep the grip from sliding off and it is glued or loctite in place. I have not had any other aftermarket grips other than Kury's Iso Grips and they slid on and are supposed to be "Glued". I used the glue that came with them, but I have heard of people using hairspray because while wet it slides on easy, but when it dries it is tacky enough to hold on, but not rip if you ever wanted to change them later. Same with other type methods.
 

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The V2K factory grips thread on (I think, never had mine off). I believe the cap on the end is a bolt that keep the grip from sliding off and it is glued or loctite in place. I have not had any other aftermarket grips other than Kury's Iso Grips and they slid on and are supposed to be "Glued". I used the glue that came with them, but I have heard of people using hairspray because while wet it slides on easy, but when it dries it is tacky enough to hold on, but not rip if you ever wanted to change them later. Same with other type methods.
I think the ones this came with are the Kury / ISO.. when I get the bike back, I'll hairspray the dickens out of em and see how it flies. Guess I'll be checkin' out youtube to watch someone do it. :)

/endthreadjack.. and thanks!!!
 

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Makes for a lot faster "get-away" when you need to do so ! :D
 

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So when parking on the street you back up to the curve, but when you park in an open parking lot (e.g. college for me) is there a specific way to park in a space. I usually just try to park in the center and pulled out enough so drivers won't think it's an open spot. Should i angle the bike or put it in the rear of the spot?
 

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Well I tell ya in a parking lot its a straight in shot.but on a curb I have found that to angle left if best if anything for me to just avoid hitting the pipes on the concrete. Other than that to each his own. Peace out!
 

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Well I tell ya in a parking lot its a straight in shot.but on a curb I have found that to angle left if best if anything for me to just avoid hitting the pipes on the concrete. Other than that to each his own. Peace out!
Interesting point about the pipes. I do the same, but had not considered that at all. now in a parking lot, I look for the best way / Easiest exit, and any hill related rolling would be back and to the left.. to pull against the stand, rather than roll of it.
 

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Interesting point about the pipes. I do the same, but had not considered that at all. now in a parking lot, I look for the best way / Easiest exit, and any hill related rolling would be back and to the left.. to pull against the stand, rather than roll of it.
Only reason I mentioned the pipes is cuz a few weeks ago we were 3 wide at a restaurant parking our bikes and I went beck to the curb straight and hit my brand new pipes hard on the high curb. Good thing its a small scrape on the bottom which will never get noticed by anyone but me. Still an eye opener just the same. So when backing up to a curb I now always angle to he left, Kind of like something else that's a part of me. Lol
 
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