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I plan on changing the oil on my V2K. I’ve read the old threads but there is one thing I couldn’t find, what type of washers/O rings does she use? Do I get 14mm and 17mm aluminum crush washers? Thanks in advance.
 

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i am wondering if those stock washers were aluminum? I don't think they were crush washers
 

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I will start off by stating that I have owned 1500, 1600, and 1700 Vulcans and other bikes, but never owned a 2000. If a Vulcan 2000 uses aluminium crush washers like other Vulcans, it is best to use a new crush washer when changing oil. When you can't get ahold of a new one (out of stock for instance), reusing the old one (once) is okay, as long as it isn't flattened-out. You can use sand paper (or just rub it on the concrete floor) to clean off a mild "Drain plug depression", left by the previous torque. A time or two, probably won't hurt if you watch for that wear pattern. If it won't clean up easily, it is too flattened-out. Not only could it leak, but more importantly, you could strip out the drain plug threads (this has happened!). Common-sense cheap, to just replace it with new. At the price paid for good motorcycle oil & a good filter, an extra dollar won't break you!
 

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Not all bikes use a crush washer. Some use o-rings, some use copper washers. It really depends on the bike and the condition of the old washer. Harley uses an o-ring, which they suggest you change every oil change. On others, they just say to inspect the condition of the washer. As I said, my experience with crush washers is with the 1500/1600 vulcans. At the end of the day, we're still only talking a buck or so. At that low price, why not follow the manufacturer's instructions?
 

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be careful that you don't over-tighten the nut, just snug it up but not too much
 

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Never try and flatten or sand a crush washer. It is nearly impossible to get it square on both sides and will only leak.
 

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I never say "Never" (too many years as a mechanic), but just think an extra buck for a new washer, is the obvious choice. Even my labor at home, on my own equipment is worth more than that!
 

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I've never replaced the o-ring or washers on the drain plugs of my '08. There is no leakage.

If there comes a time I see any sign of a leak I'll replace it but not until then.

But, if anyone wants to replace theirs every time or whatever, hey, it's your scooter.
 

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If you have changed your oil regularly on a 2008 engine that uses crush washers on the drain plug, you would be wise to spend a buck on a new washer, once in awhile.

Saving money is a good thing, as long as the drain plug is tight and seals. Besides: you'll be able to afford a new drain plug or a Heli-Coil for the crankcase, someday!
 

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Reminds me of a used Harley I bought once. Oily bottom of a Harley is not unique, and there was no fresh drips. As I do with all "new" bikes I aquire, I dropped the oil and filter. I noticed a lot of Teflon paste (liquid form of Teflon tape) on the threads of the drain plug. Wiped that crap off and saw the o-ring on it was paper thin. Replaced the o-ring and cleaned plug threads, reinstalled. No leaks. Bottom of bike kept dry as I rode it, from then-on. I suppose Teflon was cheaper than an o-ring?
 

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I USED TO HEAT UP WASHERS ON THE STOVE OR WITH A TOURCH. They would swell up and you can reuse them again. Did that on two stroke head bolts also.
 

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vulcandoc , Because it only takes five minutes. Unless you live next door to a shop that might have one or order online which will take time to get one. Throwing one away is a waste of material and time.
 

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Which is why I said to just spend the extra buck. You spent $15-20 on oil, $6-8 on a filter, time and gas to drive to a store to get it, and you're going to ignore the book's recommendation and skimp on a 95 cent washer?

Oh well, while we're at it, why not just leave the filter and plug alone, syphon out the oil, drain it through cheesecloth, and pour it back into the bike?
 
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