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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Tried to search and was unable to find out a definite answer: what color is coolant in Vulcans 650S? Tried to shine the light through the expansion level bottle and I swear I see blue but saw some comments about 'adding green coolant.'

I am asking because I would like to top off the coolant (with the right one of course) to sit somewhere in between L and H in the expansion tank. Right now I am just at the L level. Again, not looking for a full flush, just a top-off.
 

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Do NOT go by color. There is no standard for color, though some mfgs do sort of follow a color system. You need an OAT type coolant (DexCool will do, too). Use an ethylene glycol (EG) based product, too. Some can be OAT and propylene glycol (PG) based, but PG does not transfer heat as well as EG. The only reason PG is even in use is because it is better for the environment than EG (and is less toxic- part of the environmental aspect - so if someone like a child drinks it they will only get diarrhea and not die).
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do NOT go by color. There is no standard for color, though some mfgs do sort of follow a color system. You need an OAT type coolant (DexCool will do, too). Use an ethylene glycol (EG) based product, too. Some can be OAT and propylene glycol (PG) based, but PG does not transfer heat as well as EG. The only reason PG is even in use is because it is better for the environment than EG (and is less toxic- part of the environmental aspect - so if someone like a child drinks it they will only get diarrhea and not die).
Well, that color thing... so you saying do not go by color implying it's ok to mix them? Based on what I managed to find on Valvoline.com (<meta property="og:title" content="Engine Coolant – Choosing the Right Type for Your Car" />), each color actually does appear to matter as it implies unique formula that should not be mixed. You're saying go with OAT which happens to be.. orange (so is DexCool). I have a whole gallon of Mopar Replacement OAT 50/50 Premix Antifreeze Coolant, which is pink - based on the guide posted it's Phosphated Hybrid OAT coolant. Yet again, not feeling too confident mixing it with the blue one (still not 100% but leaning toward that color) in my Vulcan.

One thing I found difficult go confirm is to check whether any given off-the-shelf product (Peak, Prestone, etc) is EG or PG based...
 

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Well, that color thing... so you saying do not go by color implying it's ok to mix them? Based on what I managed to find on Valvoline.com (<meta property="og:title" content="Engine Coolant – Choosing the Right Type for Your Car" />), each color actually does appear to matter as it implies unique formula that should not be mixed. You're saying go with OAT which happens to be.. orange (so is DexCool). I have a whole gallon of Mopar Replacement OAT 50/50 Premix Antifreeze Coolant, which is pink - based on the guide posted it's Phosphated Hybrid OAT coolant. Yet again, not feeling too confident mixing it with the blue one (still not 100% but leaning toward that color) in my Vulcan.

One thing I found difficult go confirm is to check whether any given off-the-shelf product (Peak, Prestone, etc) is EG or PG based...
2 things I can say&attest to/1,the Kawasaki OEM Brand is GREEN in Color,I should know as I've used it twice;I have also tryed the Blue 1 called Engine ice,I Can't really say I saw any difference in my bikes engine running hotter or cooler(Same stuff,Different day,-lol:) )/Also,as I've been1 to try my Darn'dst to thoroughly check out things like this,Supposedly researchers have come to the conclusion that IF 1 did mix the Green&the Blue,it really Would'nt make for a whole lot of a Difference or not. Personally,though I am well aware that the owners manual suggests an time(&or Mileage) interval for When our bikes coolant Should be changed,I like to change mine once a year,it's not that hard to do\"an ounce of patience along w/a lil bit of Preventive Maintenance is worth Alot More than a Pound of Aggravation!!?!!& it just Might $ave you some money:):unsure:;):cool::sneaky:
 

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Color does matter and NO DO NOT MIX colors!!!!
Having said that, as long as you use the right required type, OAT, HOAT, rolled OATS, it doesn't matter the color you put back in, as long as you drain ALL the old color out!
 

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If you would have expressed your concern more clearly up front, you would have saved yourself - and others some time.

You asked about green or blue coolant and then pontificated about how ONLY have pink and you don't believe in mixing coolant colors. Well okay.....

So the original question was totally irrelevant.

Sabre-T's response focused on your question and the information given.

Good luck


Well, that color thing... so you saying do not go by color implying it's ok to mix them? Based on what I managed to find on Valvoline.com (<meta property="og:title" content="Engine Coolant – Choosing the Right Type for Your Car" />), each color actually does appear to matter as it implies unique formula that should not be mixed. You're saying go with OAT which happens to be.. orange (so is DexCool). I have a whole gallon of Mopar Replacement OAT 50/50 Premix Antifreeze Coolant, which is pink - based on the guide posted it's Phosphated Hybrid OAT coolant. Yet again, not feeling too confident mixing it with the blue one (still not 100% but leaning toward that color) in my Vulcan.

One thing I found difficult go confirm is to check whether any given off-the-shelf product (Peak, Prestone, etc) is EG or PG based...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you would have expressed your concern more clearly up front, you would have saved yourself - and others some time.

You asked about green or blue coolant and then pontificated about how ONLY have pink and you don't believe in mixing coolant colors. Well okay.....

So the original question was totally irrelevant.

Sabre-T's response focused on your question and the information given.

Good luck
You're right - I should have added to my original post that the reasoning for asking the question was to determine what coolant to use in order to top off the fluid. I am currently right at L in the expansion tank and the manual calls to be somewhere in between L and H. Again, not looking for a full flush, just a top-off.
 

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Well, that color thing... so you saying do not go by color implying it's ok to mix them? Based on what I managed to find on Valvoline.com (<meta property="og:title" content="Engine Coolant – Choosing the Right Type for Your Car" />), each color actually does appear to matter as it implies unique formula that should not be mixed. You're saying go with OAT which happens to be.. orange (so is DexCool). I have a whole gallon of Mopar Replacement OAT 50/50 Premix Antifreeze Coolant, which is pink - based on the guide posted it's Phosphated Hybrid OAT coolant. Yet again, not feeling too confident mixing it with the blue one (still not 100% but leaning toward that color) in my Vulcan.

One thing I found difficult go confirm is to check whether any given off-the-shelf product (Peak, Prestone, etc) is EG or PG based...
No, I'm not implying that you can mix any two together. It is probably OK to mix most OAT types together, but there are some that do no play well together and can gel in the system. Therefore, you should probably not try mixing them. Again, there is NO color standard. I suggest you pick a coolant, drain the system, use that coolant to refill and stick to it if you need to top it off.

Phosphated Hybrid OAT is not OAT! HOAT (hybrid OAT) is not OAT. OAT is OAT. There are more than one DexCool "standard", so I tend to stay away from those, but afaik, they are all OK for our bikes.

If you want to know what type of glycol a coolant is based on, look up the MSDS (or SDS), or look it up on their web site. If you can't find the info, move on to something else.
 

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2 things I can say&attest to/1,the Kawasaki OEM Brand is GREEN in Color,I should know as I've used it twice;I have also tryed the Blue 1 called Engine ice,I Can't really say I saw any difference in my bikes engine running hotter or cooler(Same stuff,Different day,-lol:) )/Also,as I've been1 to try my Darn'dst to thoroughly check out things like this,Supposedly researchers have come to the conclusion that IF 1 did mix the Green&the Blue,it really Would'nt make for a whole lot of a Difference or not. Personally,though I am well aware that the owners manual suggests an time(&or Mileage) interval for When our bikes coolant Should be changed,I like to change mine once a year,it's not that hard to do\"an ounce of patience along w/a lil bit of Preventive Maintenance is worth Alot More than a Pound of Aggravation!!?!!& it just Might $ave you some money:):unsure:;):cool::sneaky:
Kawasaki coolants use EG. Engine Ice is PG with additives to make it cool better. With those additives, Engine Ice still doesn't cool as well as EG without the additives. Add those or similar additives to an EG coolant and you will notice a big difference. I add Royal Purple Purple Ice to my coolant (EG based) and it definitely cools better.

There have been cases where mixing 2 different brands of coolant (same color, same type) have gelled in the cooling systems (2, 3, or more wheeled vehicles). Usually only when adding some new coolant into a system to coolant of another brand (but same type) that has been run for a while. It's rare, but it does happen, so I never mix coolants in any of my vehicles.

As far as the change interval is concerned, every two years is quite sufficient (unless you are riding a LOT of miles every year), but more often won't hurt anything. It's not going to save you money, though. I change mine every 2 years and run an alkaline engine flush (never vinegar!) through the system every other change.
 

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Color does matter and NO DO NOT MIX colors!!!!
Having said that, as long as you use the right required type, OAT, HOAT, rolled OATS, it doesn't matter the color you put back in, as long as you drain ALL the old color out!
As I said, there are some companies that sort of follow an unofficial color standard, but there is no real color standard! A yellow and a green by different mfgs can have the same chemistry. Two greens by different mfgs can have different chemistries. You will may be OK mixing two coolants of the same color by some major mfgs, but there are a lot of coolants out there that don't adhere to the unofficial standard.

As you said, drain (probably at least one water flush would be good) then add new coolant if using a different brand. Top off only with the same brand and type and figure out why you are needing to top off in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
All right, seems like the best course of action will be to drain the coolant altogether, settle on one brand of coolant preferably EG based (found some other threads recommending Honda Motorcycle one), flush and fill.

Due to the inability to determine the current type of coolant, topping off appears questionable at best.

Since I am in MD and I have probably only few (cool) riding days (if any) left in the season, I am going to tackle this task in the spring. Maybe due for one anyways as my bike is 2018. Not sure if previous owner did coolant flush in the past.
 

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IF it is only at "L" leave it alone. There is plenty below the "L" for the system to use.
My car right now is at the lower level and has been for 2 plus years with no problems!
WHY go through all this hassle and expense for 2 ounces to top off??
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
IF it is only at "L" leave it alone. There is plenty below the "L" for the system to use.
My car right now is at the lower level and has been for 2 plus years with no problems!
WHY go through all this hassle and expense for 2 ounces to top off??
Good point. But to elaborate on "why:" I'm brand new to this (motorcycle) thing and wanted to do things 'by the book.' Manual calls for the level to fall 'between the lines' so here is me trying to 'do the right thing.'
 

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All right, seems like the best course of action will be to drain the coolant altogether, settle on one brand of coolant preferably EG based (found some other threads recommending Honda Motorcycle one), flush and fill.

Due to the inability to determine the current type of coolant, topping off appears questionable at best.

Since I am in MD and I have probably only few (cool) riding days (if any) left in the season, I am going to tackle this task in the spring. Maybe due for one anyways as my bike is 2018. Not sure if previous owner did coolant flush in the past.
Since you are at the end of the season, and you can see some coolant in the reservoir when the bike is cool, it's a decent decision to keep riding a short while until the end of the season. Just keep an eye on the coolant level. If you don't have a leak, you should not see a drop in the reservoir. If you do see a drop, stop riding and take care of things before you ride any more, as you may have a leak and you don't want to suck air into the system.

So a question here is: Do you regularly check the coolant level? How long since the last check, if ever? When was it last changed? These systems are pretty tight, and if you change to coolant on schedule, you should never need to add any unless you have a leak, even if it's tiny, somewhere. Could be a crossover tube, or even the cap going bad. If you haven't checked the coolant in several years, then you might expect a little loss, but not to below the fill level, unless it's been a really long time since it was checked or changed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So a question here is: Do you regularly check the coolant level? How long since the last check, if ever? When was it last changed? These systems are pretty tight, and if you change to coolant on schedule, you should never need to add any unless you have a leak, even if it's tiny, somewhere. Could be a crossover tube, or even the cap going bad. If you haven't checked the coolant in several years, then you might expect a little loss, but not to below the fill level, unless it's been a really long time since it was checked or changed.
All legit questions. I have had the bike for less than 3 weeks. Purchased used (it's a 2018 with 1400 miles) with coolant level at L already. Previous owner had stated that he has not seen it dropping and - per his mechanic who looked over the bike few months before him selling it - it's ok to keep it at L. As I can ascertain from the bike's history, it has been sitting relatively unused for about 3 years, with only 80 miles added between the original purchase date (sometimes in 2018 and early September of 2021). No obvious sings of leaks in the time I have had it. Plan is to obviously keep an eye on it as I keep it through the full riding season.
 

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All legit questions. I have had the bike for less than 3 weeks. Purchased used (it's a 2018 with 1400 miles) with coolant level at L already. Previous owner had stated that he has not seen it dropping and - per his mechanic who looked over the bike few months before him selling it - it's ok to keep it at L. As I can ascertain from the bike's history, it has been sitting relatively unused for about 3 years, with only 80 miles added between the original purchase date (sometimes in 2018 and early September of 2021). No obvious sings of leaks in the time I have had it. Plan is to obviously keep an eye on it as I keep it through the full riding season.
So he bought it new or used with 1320 miles on it and rode it for all of 80 miles in 3 years?

Sitting that much with that few miles on it, I would change all the fluids before next riding season. Actually, if it were me, I would have changed them already, especially the brake fluid. A good going over from one end to the other is in order. It may not be a very old bike, but sitting that long can have detrimental effects.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So he bought it new or used with 1320 miles on it and rode it for all of 80 miles in 3 years?

Sitting that much with that few miles on it, I would change all the fluids before next riding season. Actually, if it were me, I would have changed them already, especially the brake fluid. A good going over from one end to the other is in order. It may not be a very old bike, but sitting that long can have detrimental effects.
I'm the third owner. It was the first (original) owner who hardly rode the bike. It was then sold in September 2021 with only 80 miles on the odometer. The second owner added about 1300 in about 2 months he has had it. Immediately after purchase he took it to the shop where they did an oil change and a fuel flush (?) and a chain clean/lube based on the service invoice I got from him. No other service records/history I am aware of. MD safety inspection (required for me to register the bike) also passed with flying color but I am not sure how much they go into the details re: brake/coolant fluids with those... (probably not that much).
 
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