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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I was amazed when I got my Vulcan 2000 and saw the 90+ octane requirement. When I got the bike it had 6k miles on it and was three years old. I was concerned about it sitting too much and thought I should add some Seafoam to the tank but the guy at the dealership warned me against it and stated it would lower the octane rating of the tank. He just recommended me using top tier fuel instead.

Here are my questions:

Is top tier fuel good enough to clean up the system without any other additives?

Does Seafoam actually lower the octane rating and if so is it enough to cause alarm?

Off topic question:

Why does the Vulcan 2000 require 90+ octane when some sport bikes do not?

Thanks for the help.
 

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Never heard of seafoam (or any other additive) lowering the octane rating.
If you mix it per the can, you are only putting in about 5 oz.

The higher octane rating is usually found on bikes with a higher compression ratio. (seems like most FI bikes have a high compression ratio than the same bike with a carb).

The ONLY reason you need higher octane fuel is to prevent 'pinging' or detonation. If you bike pings under acceleration than use a higher octane fuel, otherwise you should be fine.

There are so many additives in fuel these days, hard to say if just top line fuel will clean your fuel system or not. I'd rather put in a known cleaner once a year or so to be sure. Once it is clean, good fuel should keep it clean.
 

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Pour about 4-5 oz in the crankcase while your at it.
How many miles on this bike? Might not really need it yet, but it won't hurt.

If if has some miles on it, but the seafoam in the oil, ride about 100 miles and then change the oil and filter.
 

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Most of these cruiser type bikes have much lower compression than a inline 4 rocket.
Here is the deal, bigger pistons generate more heat when compressing (more volume), so to stave off preignition/detonation higher octane is needed because it burns slower and is less likely to flash.
Think about your air compressor how hot is gets and there is no combustion at all.
Ideally there is no explosion in the combustion chamber, when the plug fires the fuel starts burning at one side on the piston (the reason wrist pins are offset) it expands in the form of a flame front and all that expanding gas pushes the piston down. The pinging you hear when you use low octane is the flame front starting at the wrong place on the piston and the piston skirt is slammed into the cyl. wall.
I will stop now! hope this helps
 
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