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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How many of you use no ethanol gas?

I started using it a couple of years ago in my 2cycle lawn equipment, and lawnmowers. Stopped me having to replace gas lines every time I turned around. Think I'll start using it in my bikes now. Probably not in my other vehicles, though. It's one to two dollars more a gallon. At least in my part of the country, it is readily available. Just wondered if anyone else used it regularly in their motorcycles, and what their experiences were with it.
 

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RE: no ethanol

I have read countless posts,both here and on many small engine forums about the degrading effect of ethanol on all rubber/plastic lines.I can attest to this because I spent almost $200 On a Stihl trimmer,only to see it fail to start after one year.Took it to the dealer and was told all lines were degraded.No more Ethanol for me...IN ANYTHING.
 

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How many of you use on ethanol gas?

I started using it a couple of years ago in my 2cycle lawn equipment, and lawnmowers. Stopped me having to replace gas lines every time I turned around. Think I'll start using it in my bikes now. Probably not in my other vehicles, though. It's one to two dollars more a gallon. At least in my part of the country, it is readily available. Just wondered if anyone else used it regularly in their motorcycles, and what their experiences were with it.
Did you mean no ethanol?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have read countless posts,both here and on many small engine forums about the degrading effect of ethanol on all rubber/plastic lines.I can attest to this because I spent almost $200 On a Stihl trimmer,only to see it fail to start after one year.Took it to the dealer and was told all lines were degraded.No more Ethanol for me...IN ANYTHING.
Yeah, at Home Depot they sell 2cycle gas mixes in cans that are ethanol free. It cost a bit more. But, considering the minimal use over time, it's worth it to me not to loose gear every winter.
 

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Here in Missouri ethanol is considered mandatory in the lower grades of gasoline. However we do have several sources of ethanol free stations, so I really don't know how this mandatory thing works. In all cases though Premium gasoline is exempt from the ethanol blending and is usually blend free at all stations. Luckily my nomad is designed for premium so it works for me. I really don't care about it costing me more. I know it's better for my scoot.
 

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Fuel in Aus is expensive compared to yanky land but I never run ethanol in any of my engines. We only have up to 10% mixed in our ethanol blend here and am unsure what your ratio is over there.

Just a rough calculation we pay $7.50 US a gallon for fuel in Aus. (We also run metric litres so it sounds wrong calling it gallons)

But our ethanol blend comes in around $6.50 US a gallon.

Run the ethanol blend in the cars at work as the people who sit in the decision chairs only see the $ per litre price and not the actually $ per KM price as ethanol blends in my experience don't get you the same fuel consumption as none ethanol blends
 

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Also is a somewhat strange situation regarding ethanol-laced gas in Oregon. State legislature mandated 10% ethanol until some boats exploded and burned because the fuel had ruined fuel systems and so caused leaks. Then boats were exempted from ethanol requirements. Later ethanol-free gas somehow became available in widely scattered places as 91 octane fuel, price is about $1 per gallon more than ethanol-laced 91. Ethanol-laced 87 ruined two 2-cycle garden machines - I was able to patch together the damaged fuel system on one for a while but eventually basically the entire fuel system was destroyed and replacement parts no longer were available.

For me it's "garbage-ahol." It also reduces fuel mileage. Its use now also a sop to those in agriculture who grow corn. The original propaganda for it was to make the U.S. fuel-independent and even that was a fallacy, and now even more so with the U.S. exporting petroleum products.
 

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A dollar plus a gallon adds up though, it is available locally to me so I am interested to price it out. I wonder what the MPG increase would be too. I got my bike with 0 miles in Jan 2016 and it has almost 19,000 miles on her now.
 

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I'm interested in finding out more about this ! I live in S.E Michigan about 30 miles north of Detroit. I will be searching for straight up , un-cut gasoline.
 

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One problem with using ethanol-free gasoline is that it is rather scarce, at least in this part of Oregon. When refueling in another town on a longer ride one may have to use the ethanol-laced stuff.
 

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I use it on my generator, chain saw etc. I put it the bike whenever I can and when we get to the rainy season I fill it and run some through the system for storage.

Hot Cruiser, how far south are you? I'm in Brookings. A friend and I were riding through Elkton and there is a station there that has ethanol free but they close at 5 so we missed that one.
 

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I used only the best premium gas on my 09 Vulcan 900. A little bit more expensive,but I believe that it has paid off and helped keep her running great. I now own a Voyager 1700 as well, and her is also running only on premium. I truly believe that I get better torque when I need it.
 

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Thanks to this thread I started looking around here for ethanol-free gas (never had a vehicle I cared enough to worry about before) and it looks like the only one I can get reliably is 100 octane. Usable, but most expensive we have here.
 

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I figure the 900s were built for handling ethanol. The owners manual recommends 87 regular, which is always mixed with 10% ethanol at least around here, so the fuel lines and everything are engineered for that. 65,000+ miles on mine, I've mostly run 87 except one riding season when I tried using mostly 89 (10% blend) with no noticeable differences for better or worse. Around here the 92 non-oxygenated (no ethanol) is pretty common and easy to find for less than a dollar over the other grades. I usually store the 900 with a tank of the pure gas for winter, but that's about it. Bring it back out in spring, back to the regular 87 10% blend. Never had any fuel-related problems to speak of.

But my 2-stroke mowers, snowblower, power washer, leaf mulchers, chain saw, 4-stroke boat motor etc all just get non-oxygenated 92 (with Seafoam). Keeps them running nice!
 

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Corn liquor (ethanol) is for drinkin’, not for burnin’ in vintage motorcycle engines.

Is an Ethanol mixture in your fuel tank the right thing for you? Ethanol is a renewable, domestically produced alcohol fuel made from plant material, such as corn, sugar cane, or grasses. Using ethanol can reduce oil dependence and greenhouse gas emissions. While I can find lots of information on why Ethanol is good for the economy and the environment, I can find nothing that says it’s good for your vintage motorcycle engine.

Most of the gasoline we buy these days is a mixture of ethanol (corn alcohol) and pure gasoline with the percentage of ethanol expressed as E10 meaning there is 10% ethanol in the gasoline.
This mixture runs fine in our modern fuel injected automobiles with combustion systems designed for that mixture as long as it doesn’t sit for ninety days or more..
The problem is running the ethanol mixture in combustion system designed for pure gasoline, like vintage carbureted power sports engines and all two cycle machines.
Sure, ethanol will run in these machines, but it causes a lot of problems.
• Ethanol has lower BTU content than pure gasoline, which means less performance and lower fuel economy.
• Ethanol absorbs water (hygroscopic) and carries that water throughout the fuel system and engine. the ethanol-water mixture will come out of solution in about ninety days and settle on the bottom of your tank (phase separation). Add a little oxygen to the mix, and you get rust. The more common side effect of this is more immediate; turn the engine on, and the fuel pump will draw the water from the bottom of the tank into the engine.
• Ethanol attacks and softens rubber, plastic, and fiberglass parts in fuel systems not designed for its use.
• Ethanol causes petroleum gasoline to turn to varnish more quickly, meaning less shelf life. This is a very important point for power sports fuel systems that can sit idle for long periods of time.
• Old ethanol gasoline varnish clogs carburetor jets, fuel injectors, fuel injection distributors, fuel pumps, and fuel filters; once varnished, it also is more likely to cause intake valves to stick and ruin the engine.
• There is a direct correlation between the amount of Ethanol used and engine failure rate caused by valve seizure.
You can find a station near you that sells ethanol free fuel at puregas.org. Expect to pay more for non Ethanol gas than a mixture, but in the long run I think it is worth it
 

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