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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys
When is the next maintenance after 3000 miles and what needs to be done for that maintenance?
I just got my bike a week ago, with 3050 miles on it, and previous owner says hes done the maintenance but did'nt say when, i guess i'm going to call him back to find out.
 

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Hey guys
When is the next maintenance after 3000 miles and what needs to be done for that maintenance?
I just got my bike a week ago, with 3050 miles on it, and previous owner says hes done the maintenance but did'nt say when, i guess i'm going to call him back to find out.
Did he give you the owners manual? It has a nice schedule in the middle. There's lots of intervals for adjustments/inspections (starting at 3750 miles), and replacement schedules starting at 7500 miles (i.e. oil, filter, plugs, etc).

Your best bet is to ask the previous owner for the manual, or get one online. Hope he has it to save you some hassle.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Bosco, i´ll do that today. Probably he was excited i was excited and forgot talk about it.
 

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Did he give you the owners manual? It has a nice schedule in the middle. There's lots of intervals for adjustments/inspections (starting at 3750 miles), and replacement schedules starting at 7500 miles (i.e. oil, filter, plugs, etc).

Your best bet is to ask the previous owner for the manual, or get one online. Hope he has it to save you some hassle.
Kawasaki has downloadable owners manuals for their bike. Its a good resource for when you buy used bikes and do not get owners manuals. Been there before.
 

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Kawasaki has downloadable owners manuals for their bike. Its a good resource for when you buy used bikes and do not get owners manuals. Been there before.
Yes, i saw those online, i´ll try that if he doesnt have mine.
 

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Aleco-Go with the synthetic oil then you only have to change it once a year. I change my filter every six months. Other then check fluid levels, air pressure and clean the air filter that's about all I do with mine and it has almost 20,000 miles on it. Oh ya I did change the plugs at 8-16,000 miles but they were in excellent condition, just wanted a fresh set.
 

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Did he give you the owners manual? It has a nice schedule in the middle. There's lots of intervals for adjustments/inspections (starting at 3750 miles), and replacement schedules starting at 7500 miles (i.e. oil, filter, plugs, etc).

Your best bet is to ask the previous owner for the manual, or get one online. Hope he has it to save you some hassle.
I am looking for a printout of the schedule.
Perhaps an Excel spreadsheet?

Thanks,
Rod
 

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These bikes are pretty much bulletproof and need little attention, maintenance-wise. However there are a few things that need to be done, most of which you can do yourself and save yourself a lot of money.
1.) Change the oil and oil filter at +/- 3000 mile intervals. Your engine will love your for that. You can stretch that out a bit if you use sythetic oil. Avoid Fram oil filters, though.
2.) Check your tire pressures each time before you go riding, and (yes I know, it's a contorversial subject) use the pressures indicated on the sidewall of the tires rather than what is listed in the owner's manual or on the sticker on the left side swing arm. The tires will last longer and the bike will handle better.
3.) When you put new tires on, pay particular attention to the drive belt tension and alignment. That's critical.
4.) Unless you are skilled mechanic with the proper tools, take the bike into a shop to have the valve clearances checked and possible adjusted.
5.) Change your spark plugs periodically, perhaps every 16--20,000 miles. It's not difficult.
6.) On those days when the weather precludes riding for any amount of time, park your bike in the middle of your garage (if you have one), remove as much bodywork, such as it is, that you can, and spend some time going over your bike, on top, underneath, from the sides, rear and front and check everything. You'd be surprised what you can find doing that. This is also a great way to get to know your bike and become intimately familiar with it. You'll learn a lot by doing that. Obtain the shop manual, as well. This will give you all the torque specs for the bike.
7.) change out the air filter at least once a year--more often if you live in a very dusty and/or dirty environment.
8.) At least once a year or two years, depending on how much riding you do, flush out all the engine coolant and replace it with fresh coolant. Do the same for your brake fluid, as well. Be careful not to get brake fluid on the paint.
9.) Change out the fork oil every couple years.

You can do all of this stuff yourself except for the valves. I do almost all my own servicing, but I take it to the shop to get the valves checked. The owner's manual has a good service interval guide, but you can do most of that yourself and save some money.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
These bikes are pretty much bulletproof and need little attention, maintenance-wise. However there are a few things that need to be done, most of which you can do yourself and save yourself a lot of money.
1.) Change the oil and oil filter at +/- 3000 mile intervals. Your engine will love your for that. You can stretch that out a bit if you use sythetic oil. Avoid Fram oil filters, though.
2.) Check your tire pressures each time before you go riding, and (yes I know, it's a contorversial subject) use the pressures indicated on the sidewall of the tires rather than what is listed in the owner's manual or on the sticker on the left side swing arm. The tires will last longer and the bike will handle better.
3.) When you put new tires on, pay particular attention to the drive belt tension and alignment. That's critical.
4.) Unless you are skilled mechanic with the proper tools, take the bike into a shop to have the valve clearances checked and possible adjusted.
5.) Change your spark plugs periodically, perhaps every 16--20,000 miles. It's not difficult.
6.) On those days when the weather precludes riding for any amount of time, park your bike in the middle of your garage (if you have one), remove as much bodywork, such as it is, that you can, and spend some time going over your bike, on top, underneath, from the sides, rear and front and check everything. You'd be surprised what you can find doing that. This is also a great way to get to know your bike and become intimately familiar with it. You'll learn a lot by doing that. Obtain the shop manual, as well. This will give you all the torque specs for the bike.
7.) change out the air filter at least once a year--more often if you live in a very dusty and/or dirty environment.
8.) At least once a year or two years, depending on how much riding you do, flush out all the engine coolant and replace it with fresh coolant. Do the same for your brake fluid, as well. Be careful not to get brake fluid on the paint.
9.) Change out the fork oil every couple years.

You can do all of this stuff yourself except for the valves. I do almost all my own servicing, but I take it to the shop to get the valves checked. The owner's manual has a good service interval guide, but you can do most of that yourself and save some money.
You have no idea how much i appreciate your advice.
 

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One other thing you might consider doing is to replace those grease fittings underneath the swing arm on your bike. Don't know what year yours is but mine is an 09 and it has three grease fittings under the bike, and two are in an excellent place to get knocked off. I went to the local hardware store, took one of the fittings in and found an allen-head (round head) bolt that was the same thread size. It's easy to put the grease fittings back on for maintenance, but there again, the bike doesn't require much greasing, maybe once a year. This will be an easy operation before you break one off.
 

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Even though the spark plugs may not be bad, it's a good idea to remove them every 12,000 miles or so for two reasons....
First, a plug can tell you a lot about the valves
Secondly, they will tend to weld tight if left for any longer period... I have a friend with a Yamaha 1600 who kept making fun of my maintenance stance, until at 30,000, he stripped out the threads on one cylinder trying to remove the welded tight plug.... An ounce of prevention saves a lot of grief down the road....
 

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Even though the spark plugs may not be bad, it's a good idea to remove them every 12,000 miles or so for two reasons....
First, a plug can tell you a lot about the valves
Secondly, they will tend to weld tight if left for any longer period... I have a friend with a Yamaha 1600 who kept making fun of my maintenance stance, until at 30,000, he stripped out the threads on one cylinder trying to remove the welded tight plug.... An ounce of prevention saves a lot of grief down the road....
I agree. A little anti-seize applied to the threads of the spark plug will help to prevent that.
 

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Even though the spark plugs may not be bad, it's a good idea to remove them every 12,000 miles or so for two reasons....
First, a plug can tell you a lot about the valves
Secondly, they will tend to weld tight if left for any longer period... I have a friend with a Yamaha 1600 who kept making fun of my maintenance stance, until at 30,000, he stripped out the threads on one cylinder trying to remove the welded tight plug.... An ounce of prevention saves a lot of grief down the road....
On the maintenance schedule it shows to replace the spark plugs every 7500 miles. I thought this was very short, even for a motorcycle. I see your doing yours at about 12k. Any issues waiting until then?
 

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On the maintenance schedule it shows to replace the spark plugs every 7500 miles. I thought this was very short, even for a motorcycle. I see your doing yours at about 12k. Any issues waiting until then?
The way I see it, spark plugs are relatively cheap and easy to change. Why wait so long? Just change them, the bike will run better when you do. Just my 2 cents.
 

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The way I see it, spark plugs are relatively cheap and easy to change. Why wait so long? Just change them, the bike will run better when you do. Just my 2 cents.
Thanks. Only buying 2. Mine is coming up for a change here shortly. ;)
 
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