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Discussion Starter #1
I finally finished wiring in the PCV and Autotune Sunday. I mounted both units behind the right cover, as I really didn't want them on the battery cover. I think this made for a much cleaner install.





I borrowed a map to get started on. I still have to wire in the gear position sensor. First thing I noticed is that the decel afterfire "moved" and the rate of decel is much milder now, I no longer feel like the bike is trying to buck me off over the handlebars! I was able to get out of the neighborhood without multiple explosions or having to coast up to stop signs. That said, I still get some afterfire, but much, much less. At higher speeds/rpms I can still get a real loud pop or two still.

How many Vaquereo Autotune users are there here, or Autotune users in general? I suspect this will be a pretty small croud. Have you tweaked the Autotune table? If so, what were your results? Have you hooked up the gear position sensor and started setting up multiple tables, and how has that worked for you? And I'm trying to understand what conditions would cause you to want to switch between using the base map or tuned map. Perahps a racing table? And finally, anyone have the Power Commander LCD unit, and what is your opinion of that? I doubt however, that I'm gonna dump $300 for a display!

I'm just looking for company with my new Autotune buds, and see how much new stuff I can learn!
 

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Not to permote another forum, but the vulcanbagger forum has a good writeup on a fella that tapped into the spped sensor with a auto tune setup and created multiple tables for each gear. Dont have access to their forum right now or I'd send you a link. Will check after work. hope this helps. I been thinking of tapping the speed sensor with the auto tune.
 

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Oldbear,
I have the autotune with gear dependent mapping. Be glad to help you if I can.

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Frank! I still have to get that extra wire tapped in and hooked up. First thing I'm wanting to hear is if you now think it is worth the extra work? My thinking was that I could lean out 5th and 6th gear fuel ratios for 2,700 to 3,200 (or thereabouts) to increase my mileage, as that is where I'm spinning for over half of my daily commute. What has your experience been so far, if you don't mind sharing with the class?
 

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Old Bear,
I setup the gear advance to do exactly what you are talking about. Lean out the A/F Ratio in 5th and 6th gear in the cruising range. I have been experimenting with the A/F Ratio from 5-20% throttle in the 2,000-3,000 RPM range. DynoJet recommends not to take the A/F Ratio over 14.7. I have used many maps and settings up to this point. Davidsheek was kind enough to send me a copy of his map. I copied the A/F Ratio table from a DynoJet map and the Fuel and Ignition table from David's map to each table (ignition and fuel) and created a gear dependent map.. I let the autotune make adjustments from there. The autotune does make adjustments for each trim table for each gear and you decide to accept or not. I was fighting the decel pop issue (finally resolved, fingers crossed) and decided to start with a 0 map and let the Autotune make adjustments. I started with the adjustment percentage at 20% and gradually reduced it to 5%. I'm pleased with how the bike is running but I haven't made any progress on the increase in fuel mileage. I did not change the ignition advance just the A/F Ratio for 5th and 6th gear. I did not see any real change in the mileage. Under normal riding conditions I get to 180 miles before the fuel light comes on. I recently installed and old map where the A/F Ratio was not leaned out. Still got to 180 miles before the fuel light came on. I will continue to work on the mileage issue. Would I do it all over again?? Yes, I think I would because I enjoy trying different things to try and improve the performance. I think the fuel mileage can be increased, I just haven't hit the right setup yet.

Frank
 

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Where is the Gear position sensor and which wire did you tap? I read your earlier post on the set up, but read it didn't work at first. What was your fix? I currently use DavidS map and let the autotune make corrections. thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Where is the Gear position sensor and which wire did you tap? I read your earlier post on the set up, but read it didn't work at first. What was your fix? I currently use DavidS map and let the autotune make corrections. thanks
I have a picture that was provided to me (I haven't done it yet), but it is at the house. If my senile ol' mind can remember it, I'll post it tonight if no one else has by then.
 

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I will do a more detailed write up and provide pics after work.
Frank
 

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Thanks Frank, that was the pictures I was gonna upload. Squared away!
 

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cool thanks, will try to night, just need to figure out the logistics of accomplishing the gear calibration as the nearest dyno is 150 miles away.
 

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This is from 1000RR on s1000rrforum.com. It should be the same procedure on all our bikes with the PCV. I think I may wait until I purchase and install the SpeedoDRD and get my speedometer displaying an accurate speed. What can I say, I'm a little anal about such things.
This DIY is intended to address - how to enable the gear selection option in the PCV so that you can ultimately have a separate map for each gear and if you’re running the AutoTuner, you will/can be producing trims for each gear’s map along with having separate target AFR tables for each gear. If you decide to perform this modification to your bike, I take no responsibility ... With this setup, you can now control fueling (similar as you did before) but for each gear independently. My main goal was to use my AutoTuner in such a way that at higher speeds (i.e. higher gears) I would be AutoTuning with the Ram Air affect on my map… and at lower speeds, less ram air affect, therefore (in theory) less fuel needed. You can also play around with responsiveness/acceleration and fuel mileage (through modifying your target AFRs). For example, you might change your AFR table in 6th gear in your cruising RPM range (of the table) to something leaner for better fuel mileage. The options are endless. You might note that the true performance of this setup would not necessarily be recognizable on a Dyno... it would take real world riding to realize (due to the ram air affect)... traps/times/etc. could be used to see the difference but a dyno might not. In other words, a dyno is just one tool in your bag - there are others too.

Perform mod at your own risk.

Tools/items needed:

Assume you already have a PCV and AutoTuner hooked up
Wire Cutters/strippers
piece of 16-18ga wire
Posi-tap for tapping into the speed sensor wire – if you prefer another method, substitute accordingly. This is what DynoJet uses so this is what I used… it’s also less evasive. Some feel that this type of connection is less dependable, I’ve had good luck w/them, but again – you can substitute another method of tapping in if you desire.


Step 1: Tapping into the Speed Sensor Wire:
edited - the pictures of where the wire is located for us is already posted.

Step 2: Tying the wire tap from the Speed Sensor into the PCV:
Best to pull out your PCV install instructions as it will have a diagram of which hole on the PCV the wire should go into for the speed sensor. If you’re looking at the holes, it’ll be the 3rd hole from the right side.

Step 3: Enabling your PCV software (on your laptop) to have multiple fuel and AFR tables (one for each gear):
Launch the PCV software. Go to the “Map Tools” drop down menu. Click on “Advance/Demote Map”. Change the setting next to “Fuel Tables” and next to “Target AFR Tables” from “Basic” to “Gear Advance”. Click “OK”. Now you will see multiple tables for AFRs, Trims, and Fuel based on Gears (1-6). If you only see multiple tables for fuel and not for AFRs and Trims (and you’re not hooked up to the bike), it means you need to change your Environment Options. Accordingly, go to the “Options” drop down menu and click on “Environment Options”. Then make sure the box for “Show auto tune tables even if the power commander is not auto tuned enabled” is ‘checked’.

Step 4: Creating your initial map/table for each gear:
You will need to create your baseline map from your last map you’ve used/saved. You can do this by opening up your last map and copying the entire fuel table (highlight the whole table, then copy) and then opening up your new map (that you will need to save along the way – as you create it) and pasting it in for each Gear’s fuel table (6 maps/tables). Then go back to the original/last map and copy the AFR table… now paste it into your new map for each gear’s Target AFR table (again 6 tables, one for each gear). Save your map! At this point, if you didn’t want to use a different AFR table for each gear and you'd rather use one AFR table for all gears, you’d go back to Step 3, and change the options accordingly.

Step 5: Calibrate the Speed Sensor/Signal from your bike to the PCV:
You will need to do this before you can calibrate the PCV for Gear Calibration (next step). This step is performed with your bike running and your laptop's USB hooked up to the PCV. DynoJet recommends using a Dyno (safety reasons); I used a rear stand and tried to ensure the bike couldn’t move around much… make sure your rear tire is safely OFF the ground. With the PCV hooked up to your laptop and the PCV software launched, click on the “Power Commander Tools” drop down menu and choose the calibrate speed option. When the popup window appears, you will enter a target speed (I used 25mph). Then you will rev your bike up to the target speed you entered - 25mph in this example (1st gear is fine, but gear selection doesn’t matter), once your dash/speedometer reads exactly what you entered as your target, you will click calibrate. Now the PCV software should read the same speed as your dash. Click OK and proceed to next step.

Step 6: Calibrate the Gear Selection for the PCV:
If you haven’t calibrated your speed sensor at this point, STOP – do that prior to proceeding. Now click on the “Power Commander Tools” drop down menu and click on Calibrate – Gear Calibration option. This will bring up the Gear Calibration popup. You will do similar to what you did in the previous step (with your bike running), except speed is not a big issue, just steady throttle. I used my throttle lock in both cases (this step and the previous) but you can do it with a steady hand too. You’re going to put the bike in 1st gear and hold the throttle steady (speed isn’t a concern, just hold the throttle steady); I think I only had the rear wheel spinning around 15-20mph. Once you’re steady on the throttle, click “Calibrate” for Gear 1 on the popup that came up. Now put the bike in 2nd gear and hold the throttle steady again, click “Calibrate” for Gear 2. Continue sequentially switching into the remaining gears until this process is complete for all 6 gears. When finished, click OK.

Step 7: Final Check
Check and ensure you’ve loaded the map you created in Step 4 above into your PCV. Just because you created it and saved it, doesn’t mean it’s loaded into the PCV. All of your Target AFR tables should be populated with values, and all of your fuel tables should be populated with values. Make sure you open it, then click “Send Map”. You might also start your bike with the PCV plugged into your laptop, and you should be able to see speed and gear selection now on the software interface. The gear selection will only appear if you're in gear with the clutch out.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Some other tidbits I found from Mike Shefler at Dynojet:
If you already have a custom map then I would hook it up per gear right away. If you don't have a custom map then I would not hook it up per gear right away. It will make changes faster if it is just trying to make one map, and not 6 different maps.

Most important thing to remember with the auto tune is that it does not work overnight. It works very well indeed, and does exactly what it is meant to, but it takes time. If you expect instant results you will be disappointed.
When i first got mine I hooked it up per gear right away. If I had to do it over again i would not have done this, I would have just had the auto tune making one single map. I would ride it around like that till most all the cells are populated, then i would set up the per gear feature.
The speed and the temp can get wired into the PCV. You would only use speed if you wanted to adjust your fuel tables per gear. You would only use temp if you were using Auto tune and wanted to only allow it to learn after a certain temp or you could offset your map based on engine temp. So if you knew that when the bike got to 210f the stock ECU map dumped too much fuel in to make the bike run cooler you could off set this. The temp (Analog line) could be used with any 0-5v sensor to offset your base fuel curve.
Also when you view the trim table make sure you click on GET MAP or GET TABLE, many people are forgetting this also.
I just had to calibrate my throttle position in the Power Commander Tools menu. Unlike the PC3 software that you manually had to set 0% and 100% throttle with < and >, the PCV does it automatically. All you have to do is:

1. Open up the Power Commander Tools/ Calibrated/ Throttle Position or Key Combo (ctrl+t)
2. With the engine running and at operating temperature hit reset.
3. Let it idle for a few moments to get a good average voltage output for 0% throttle.
4. Twist the throttle to fully open just enough that the computer reads the voltage output. The bike doesn't have to red line. The computer just needs to register full open throttle.
5. Hit save and you are done.

"The bike should always be running when setting the throttle position. The voltage the sensor sends out can vary between when the bike is at “key on” and “motoring running”. The bike also needs to be at full operating temperature. Once you are in the Powercommander Control Center Software, go to “Power Commander Tools” then “Set throttle Position”. All you need to do is press "reset" while the bike running then turn the throttle wide open till you hit the mechanical stop. Then let go and press "Ok". You don't have to rev the bike out, the throttle just needs to go all the way back.
Auto tune owners
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Do i have to open up the body to remove some rubber from the wire connectors holes. Im loathed to start cracking the thing open but the rubber seems to be blocking the wires?

There is felt behind the holes to keep debris out. Poke thru the felt with a paperclip and the wires will go right in.
I was curious about the minimum temperature setting. I was under the impression that you needed to run another line for the temp. If you don't have a temp line and you enable the min temp setting, does that mean the autotune will never come on since the PC will never register the minimum temp?

That is correct. If you check the TEMP and do NOT have the line connected to the PCV it will never turn on. The software will read in farenheit which is not a problem unless you want it to match your dash. In that case you need to change the temperature table.
 

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Old Bear,
Excellent write up on the procedure. A dyno is recommended but I didn't have that option. I raised my bike on a lift. My better half assisted with the laptop settings while I managed the throttle.
Frank
 

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I have a PCV and AutoTune on my 2010 Voyager. My AutoTune keeps pulling more and more fuel from my map to the point the bike starts missing. I sent the AutoTune unit and O2 sensor to Dynojet, they supposedly tested it and returned it saying it's fine.

I've talked to tech support several times, the problem still remains. The worst fuel cell is the 20%/4000rpm cell. At one time AutoTune had this cell down -50. That's a 50% reduction from the stock Kawasaki fuel value. Most of the cells in my map are in the negative and that's using the stock AFR values suggested by Dynojet.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've been running mine for a week now, that is a little over 2,000 miles or so. I'll get to look at the map this weekend. I do know that every day, the mileage has ticked up a bit, so it is improving things for me. And that is with the original AFR table.
 
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