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Discussion Starter #1
Hey All,

Im heading to BRC this weekend and kind of nervous. I have heard so many horror stories about BRC and how much people still werent prepared for the road. I already have my bike so i wanna make sure i pass the course.

Any advice?

-Preacher
 

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the techniques taught at these courses can be used on any size motorcycle, and if you ever drop the bike smile, because you just earned your wings
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, i will keep that in mind. I have heard the motto of two types of riders. lol
 

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If it's going to be hot where you are, be sure to drink plenty of fluids. It can be brutally hot on those courses, sitting still with engines running, waiting for your turn to do "stuff".

I took the course here in Georgia in August. It was miserable. I just failed (first time I ever rode a bike and at age 55). Took it again in December when it was well below freezing. We killed a lot of hot chocolate that day.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
i just checked the weather and it should be around 70's so hopefully i should be good. i got my bike just waiting for me to pass so i cant afford to not pass lol
 

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Hey All,

Im heading to BRC this weekend and kind of nervous. I have heard so many horror stories about BRC and how much people still werent prepared for the road. I already have my bike so i wanna make sure i pass the course.

Any advice?

-Preacher
The BRC is not intended to give you the skills to be totally prepared for the road and it's unrealistic to think it could. The course is designed to give you the basic skills to practice further on the street. Even still in many states the course is a licensing waiver course and it does have much to offer. As an MSF RiderCoach & Total Control instructor the only advice I will offer in preparation for the class is to keep an open mind. Some things may sound strange or conflict with some preconceptions you may have but accept the coaching & try it. Flat out.....the techniques work & work well. If you have any additional questions just ask.
 

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i just checked the weather and it should be around 70's so hopefully i should be good. i got my bike just waiting for me to pass so i cant afford to not pass lol
I don't know about where you are, but I got a "learners permit" even before I took the class. It just required the written part of the test. I got that so I could ride some (no night, or passenger riding) and got the bike before I took the class.
 

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I'm a brand new rider and I took the MSF course last weekend. It was tough but I passed. They throw a lot at you in a couple days. Some people in my class caught on quicker than others. Some of it is opposite of what your natural instincts are so you need to really trust the rider coaches and that the bike will do what they're telling you it will do.

As far as advice goes, like Gearhead759 said, listen to the rider coaches and do it the way they tell you. Trust them. It works. And most important... RELAX. There were people in my class that psyched themselves out.

The course does not teach you everything that you need to ride on the roads, it is probably 98% low speed maneuvering. But that's the hardest part. If you can do that, going straight on the road is not that hard.

When I got my license I spent a few days just putt-putting around my quiet neighborhood getting a feel for my bike and the techniques I learned in class, then I went out on some side roads where there isn't much traffic. I'm still working my way up to riding in traffic and at highway speed. There were some things from the class that I didn't quite get in the class setting, but once I started using them in the real world, it clicked.

Trust the rider coaches
Trust the bike
RELAX

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Many thanks to those who lended some advice. I took it all into consideration, i learned how hot a jacket can get in the open sun, but in the end I PASSED!!!!!

Now i have to get used to my bike which is a big difference from the suzuki GZ250 i was riding in the course. gotta learn when to lean and when to counter-steer. i figure low speeds, countersteer and high speed just lean?
 

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Good to hear of your success Preacher. Gear on riding low speeds in a parking lot will no doubt heat one up. From here just practice, practice, practice.....Low speed use counter-weighting (leaning opposite) higher than jogging speed will be countersteering - press in direction of the turn and lean with the motorcycle
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good to hear of your success Preacher. Gear on riding low speeds in a parking lot will no doubt heat one up. From here just practice, practice, practice.....Low speed use counter-weighting (leaning opposite) higher than jogging speed will be countersteering - press in direction of the turn and lean with the motorcycle
Thanks a lot Gearhead, i will keep that in mind. i rode to work today so i can keep practicing the skills on local roads.
 

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