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Discussion Starter #1
So I acquired a 1993 Vulcan 500 that has been sitting in storage for the last eight + years.
I've checked for the obvious like dry rot and corrosion. I need to clean the gas tank, and all that.
But I would like to know what are some common trouble points for these. I'm no newbie to small engines and I've spent the last five years working on and customizing various Jeeps, so the actual mechanics isn't a problem. I know that every run of any motor and vehicle has it's own quirks that are common across most of that production line.
What are some things to watch out for? something I definitely want to check regularly?
Also, best online places to get spare parts? Places to stay away from?
Thanks for any and all pointers!
 

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I needed a new toolbox panel that goes under the left side cover. I found the best price and great service at Fallen Cycles in Daytona Beach Florida for used parts.
 

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Most likely suspect after what you've already checked for is the carbs -- if there was gasoline sitting in them all that time, it's varnish. Perhaps that was the "all that."

While you're in there wrenching, anyway, adjust the valves.

How many miles on the bike?
 

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Petcocks are prone to failure, leading to flooding the carbs, and if left long enough, eventually the crankcase. You can stop this by checking and rebuilding the petcock if needed, at an interval based upon use. If you're using it a lot and switching back and forth between on, and reserve, you might need to check it more often.

The carbs seems to be the source of most issues, with the battery being second, with running properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah I'm pretty sure the petcock needs replaced on this one. It's pretty rough looking. I might want to replace the gas cap from it sitting so long too. Had a hard time getting it open. (Rubber mallet ftw)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So a buddy of mine says to buy a carb rebuild kit and rebuild the carb straight away. However said buddy doesn't have a bike and hasn't see the bike in pieces in person. Everything so far looks like it's all brand new with the exception of some exposed parts due to weathering. I'm wondering if I should just spend the money now and do it, or wait and see. I'm leaning towards the wait and see side of things. I haven't run it yet.
 

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Gotta love those people who just invent projects for you to do, based on pretty much, "I heard that some guy said...", eh? :grin2:

The big question is how it was stored. If the gas was drained and didn't just sit in the carb all that time, you're probably good to go. If it wasn't -- well, prudence and best practices says you're going to be cleaning the tank and carb anyway, which means you'll need new gaskets and seals and such, so ....

Normally I'd say, "fire it up, see if there's a problem before you go fixin' what ain't broke", since so many carb rebuilds seem to go so sadly awry, but you seem to have quite a background in small engine repair, so you won't leave it in worse shape than you found it.

Have you had the bike running and running okay? That would be a strong indicator for "add some Seafoam and let sleeping carbs lie."
 

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Check the flywheel magnets. Up until 1996 they were segmented and glued into the flywheel. They are prone to becoming unstuck, potentially fragmenting and causing significant damage.
 

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Pulling plugs, rotating engine...looking for no major resistance or grinding sounds ...magnet remnants in the oil would also reveal.
Followed by a stand alone stator output test to confirm voltage is up to spec.

Magnets def an Achilles heel to the old Gen 1 flywheel....improved Gen 2 flywheels can be modded to "update".....note ignition triggering differs between the generations....not a simple bolt-on swap.

Sitting for 8+ years automatically justifies an immediate carb clean/intense inspection, IMHO. Tank integrity (rust?) and petcock performance closely scrutinized as well.
 

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I am not sure what the rules are on this, but I know a guy, from a different forum, who sells carb kits for our carbs at a much cheaper price than you can get anywhere else. If you're interested, pm me.

With that said, if you don't know how it was stored, avoid problems in the future, and clean them now, before you try to run it. And flush the tank.
 

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From a cost POV a carb rebuild kit is not expensive. Given it has been sat for a long time, and the carbs on these seem quite fickle I think I would go ahead and do it. I was glad to have done it on mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks all.
It was stored indoors and the tank was empty. However tank still needs cleaned (waiting on payday. That's the problem with free things; they cost too much) and the petcock needs maintenance on visual inspection. The bike was very well taken care of before it was put in storage for the most part.
 
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