Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello to all. Buying a new 2010 Nomad next week. Hope to obtain a lot of good info from all of you Nomad afficionados. One question first up though. What is be preferred gas to use in a 1700? The manual states regular gas, yet my buddy who rides a 1600 Nomad suggests only premium. What about E10? Thanks for your help!:waving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,146 Posts
Hello to all. Buying a new 2010 Nomad next week. Hope to obtain a lot of good info from all of you Nomad afficionados. One question first up though. What is be preferred gas to use in a 1700? My buddy who rides a 1600 Nomad suggests only premium. What about E10? Thanks for your help!:waving:
Well, first off, follow the owner's manual on fuel or you'll void the warranty.
If it's a stock bike, it's set up lean from the factory to meet emission standards. This means it will run hotter, so premium fuel is indicated as it burns slower and not as hot. However, should you put aftermarket pipes and remap the injectors, you could probably get by on regular gas. A lean mix detonates earlier than a rich mix, so premium gas slows detonation. But if your bike is running normally or a bit rich, premium will eventually create carbon buildup and deposits.

Ethanol in gas doesn't burn as efficiently as undiluted gas, it too can make your engine run hotter by making it work harder, and your mileage is worse. I just read a study where a guy with a research company drove a car about 300 miles round trip on straight gas, then repeated it at the same speed and distance with ethanol juiced fuel, and got about a 4-5 mpg difference. This means your engine has to work a little harder to operate at the same speed as it would with straight gas. I also read they want to switch to E15, with the ultimate goal being E27. :eek: :mad:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,444 Posts
As I understand it E-15 was approved for newer vehicles only. When they start selling E-15 along side the E-10; I wonder what grade will be E-10 and what grade will be E-15?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Go ahead and use premium gas...I'm sure your buddy has a better understanding of the engineering required to run your engine at it's best efficiency than those dummies at Kawasaki. (Taking tongue from cheek now)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Funny thing is this. Some motorcycle review websites are stating that the 1700 requires regular with 91 octane as a minimum. That is essentially premium grade where I come from:thinking:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Octane ratings - confusing? From Wikipedia:

"Research Octane Number (RON)

The most common type of octane rating worldwide is the Research Octane Number (RON). RON is determined by running the fuel in a test engine with a variable compression ratio under controlled conditions, and comparing the results with those for mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane.
[edit] Motor Octane Number (MON)

There is another type of octane rating, called Motor Octane Number (MON), or the aviation lean octane rating, which is a better measure of how the fuel behaves when under load, as it is determined at 900 rpm engine speed, instead of the 600 rpm for RON.[2][3] MON testing uses a similar test engine to that used in RON testing, but with a preheated fuel mixture, higher engine speed, and variable ignition timing to further stress the fuel's knock resistance. Depending on the composition of the fuel, the MON of a modern gasoline will be about 8 to 10 points lower than the RON, however there is no direct link between RON and MON. Normally, fuel specifications require both a minimum RON and a minimum MON." (Wikipedia)

So it is possible that gasoline which is rated at 87 octane may also be rated at 91 octane! Net result for me is that my VN900 with a 9.5:1 CR runs fine on gasoline which is labeled 87 on the pump switch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
Actually, the owner's manual states you should use only 91 octane premium gasoline in the Nomad 1700. Perhaps it's different for the Canadian models, though.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top