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Discussion Starter #21
Things that have been eliminated as problem: battery, ignition switch, start stop switch, dfi relay, ignition coils, ignition pulse triggers, and
junction box. The variable here is the igniter. Although it seems to function once the bike is started and continues to until the ignition switch is turned off, I would not eliminate it until I was able to try another for testing. There are no test procedures for an igniter. Perhaps you can find one for a loaner. The part # you need is: 21175-0048. '05 ~ '08 Nomad. I would suggest if you have not already done so, disconnect and inspect all connector plugs, look for bent or damaged pins, use a dielectric grease and reconnect . Good luck, and keep us posted with results.

I couldn't sleep last night thinking about this damn thing. I was looking up the ignition system, and igniter was one I was reading about. It's built into the ECU....and I have been suspecting the ECU. I see a local Nomad for sale, would perhaps offer the guy some money for a few minutes of testing. I would think a VN1600 ECU of the same vintage would work as well?

I'm also looking to checking the crankshaft sensor. Not much else out there to check.
 

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These engines do not have a crankshaft position sensor. They do have two magnetic sensors, but their job is to fire the coils. You can eliminate these as it starts and runs. They are either good or bad, no inbetween.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
These engines do not have a crankshaft position sensor. They do have two magnetic sensors, but their job is to fire the coils. You can eliminate these as it starts and runs. They are either good or bad, no inbetween.
Haha, yeah I would think I could eliminate a lot of things since it starts and runs. :laugh2:

I even found a junction box in my stash of parts from a late 90's Ninja 250, plugged that in and no change. Funny how it was plug and play from such a different model.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Crankshaft sensors do have a resistance reading, I might as well check them to eliminate it before going for the ECU.
 

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Correct, they do and it should be in the range of 380 ~ 560 ohms. But more importantly is their peak voltage which should be 2.2 volts or more.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Correct, they do and it should be in the range of 380 ~ 560 ohms. But more importantly is their peak voltage which should be 2.2 volts or more.
I don't have a peak voltage adapter, so unless I fabricate one I am just checking the resistance.
 

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Try changing grey wire resistor to around the 80 ohm mark and see what happens.
I would not suspect a sensor issue.
 

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Also, there is an orange colored joint connector (grounds) near the battery.
Check it for signs of burning. These can cause all kinds of weird issues if they have been overheated.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Try changing grey wire resistor to around the 80 ohm mark and see what happens.
I would not suspect a sensor issue.
I had considered this. I have a spare ignition without a key, I was just going to cut the wires and make it into a jumper plug. If I do that, I could just wire in a different resistor. The only reason I don't think that will matter is that the bike starts with the 100 ohm resistor after the initial start. But it's cheap enough to try before spending money on an ECU.


Also, there is an orange colored joint connector (grounds) near the battery.
Check it for signs of burning. These can cause all kinds of weird issues if they have been overheated.
I had looked at this, it doesn't appear to be in bad shape but I saw posts about it online. I'm considering doing the ground block repair I have seen. It's just another thing that doesn't cost much and can be eliminated as a suspect.

Thanks for the ideas, I appreciate the input.
 

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The reason I suggested the resistor is there is a possibility that the anti-theft incorporates an electronic latch that, once set, will remain until key off.
If the circuit is border line with the charger pushing it over into latch condition but the battery, alone, does not, then the resistor change may show that up.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
The reason I suggested the resistor is there is a possibility that the anti-theft incorporates an electronic latch that, once set, will remain until key off.
If the circuit is boarder line with the charger pushing it over into latch condition but the battery, alone, does not, then the resistor change may show that up.
Well I have had the exact same thought so I do appreciate it. I'm going to try it before picking up an ECU.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I soldered in a 75 ohm resistor, it only brought the voltage up to 6.5 and didn't start the bike. I didn't have many other choices for resistors, so I wired three 20 ohm resistors together for 60 ohms total, brought the ECU voltage up to 7.5 or so, no change.

I picked up a can of electrical contact cleaner, sprayed out the connections on the ECU and looked for any obvious damage on the pins and connectors but none obvious.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I keep thinking that maybe there is a wire or connection that has corrosion or resistance in it that is causing this issue, but it doesn't explain why it would start on the booster and then start again and again on just the battery after the initial start until the key is cycled. There must be some circuitry in the ECU or something.....I haven't found anything else in the wiring diagram that it could be.
 

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I soldered in a 75 ohm resistor, it only brought the voltage up to 6.5 and didn't start the bike. I didn't have many other choices for resistors, so I wired three 20 ohm resistors together for 60 ohms total, brought the ECU voltage up to 7.5 or so, no change.

I picked up a can of electrical contact cleaner, sprayed out the connections on the ECU and looked for any obvious damage on the pins and connectors but none obvious.
You said earlier that the voltage to the ECU was 8.0 V with the booster. One or two of those 20 ohm resistors should get you there. If you can at least crank it with the lower resistance allowing 8 plus volts to the ECU, it would seem to point very strongly at it being the anti-theft circuit in the ECU.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I guess I will try to remove one of the resistors tomorrow, down to 40 ohms. It won't cost anything to try at least.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Went down to 40 ohms, got 8.4 VDC to the ECU and no start.

I'm wondering if there's something else I'm missing? I see wiring harnesses on Ebay are cheap enough. I ordered a tip over switch for $5 as well, just in case that's having some sort of effect on this thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
I'm still not quite ready to order an ECU. I have been doing a lot of resistance checks, etc.

The grounds on the ECU are supposed to read continuity ( 0 ohms) on pins 10, 20, 32 and 42 to the battery ground terminal with the key on or off. They are reading low ohms, 0.5 or so with the key off but all of them are reading about 82 ohms with the key on. That doesn't change with the booster on, but the bike starts.

I was reading the resistance at the orange ground joint connector, thinking about changing that out. With the key off, they are all under 1 ohm. Turning the key on the resistance jumps to about 200 as the pump cycles, then drops to 82.

I checked the resistance from the main ground wire from the frame to the battery, zero resistance.

All this said, adding the booster changes the resistance with the key off down to zero, but with the key on/booster on the numbers are higher and the bike starts. Then shutting off the booster, shutting off the bike with the kill switch and the resistance numbers are the same as before, the bike starts off the battery. Until the key is cycled off and on again.

Mind blown!

I have a couple YouTube videos but I don't know if it's cool to post them here. Someone let me know and I will put up the links.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
When you attach the booster, are you connecting directly to the battery + & - terminals?
Yes. Here's the Video showing the issue, there are links to getting the bike initially going embedded into that video.

 

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My ISP is so poor I cannot watch videos. Was wondering if maybe a battery connector had a bad connection where the cable crimps to it. Have you tried wiggling some of the wiring around the battery when trying to start without the booster?
 
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