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I bought a 2008 Custom 900 the first week of August. Last week the battery was dead and it would not start. Ended up replacing the battery. i rode a few days and then tried to start it and it was dead again. Took at to a different dealership than where I bought it and they said it was going to be a $1200 fix.

Here's my question, is this thing a lemon and should I take it back to the original dealership and see if they will help me? The service guy at the 2nd dealership said if it was him he would take it back and raise a stink about how he only bought the bike 6 weeks ago and this should not be happening. BTW, the bike has just under 18,000 miles on it.

Please give me some advise!
 

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I would take it back to the original dealer. My first guess is the stator. This is a common weak point in these bike. There is a "Sticky" in the 900 forum with info on how to diagnose and fix. But I would try the original deal first and see if they will help ya out. Sometimes stators do not give any warning.
 

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This is an extremely important example of why you have to diagnose everything! When a bike has a dead battery; always test charging voltage before just replacing parts, so you don't end up stranded!

That said, the stator IS a common failure. The dealer may or may not fix it, but understand most used bikes are 'as-is'. You can raise a stink, but, fact is, if the engine blew the moment you took it off the lot; you still wouldn't have any legal leg to stand on. As-is is As-is.

The stator fix if you are remotely mechanically handy requires a decent meter and knowledge to use it, a torque wrench, about $160 in parts + the supplies for an oil change, and really shouldn't take more than 2 hours (I bet I could do it in 45 minutes now that I've done it once). This assumes the regulator/rectifier is okay; which should be tested as well. I don't know why dealers bid so high on a stator repair. It's not a particularly difficult, technical, or time consuming job. 3 hours would be an insanely long amount of time for a professional to do this job; and would only be if he took 2 hours of that 3 hours in the break room. But even then the math doesn't add up to $1200. Keep in mind that the OEM stator is around $600, and this is one of those rare cases where cheaper IS better. The aftermarket stator (Rick's Stator) is much better, known to last longer, and is only about $150.
 
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