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A nice smartphone and the Waze app.
Lol. I was going to say a smart phone..

My stero is connected to my android phone via bluetooth. I've actually used the gps while on the bike.

You should have seen the people at the intersection faces when my bike said "Turn left on...."
 

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Lol. I was going to say a smart phone..

My stero is connected to my android phone via bluetooth. I've actually used the gps while on the bike.

You should have seen the people at the intersection faces when my bike said "Turn left on...."


Same here, have my Android phone connected via a blue tooth adapter to not only play music, but to use the free GPS, having it play over the speakers surprises many.
 

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The solution I use is my smartphone and a helmet bluetooth audio setup. I got a shark brand bluetooth helmet headset that has been PHENOMENAL. A hundred bucks and you get two headsets for two helmets (3/4 or better, but I'm sure a little ingenuity could get it mounted pretty easily on a half shell). Wife and I can hear each other clear as day on the interstate, while talking in normal voices, while she's 1/4 mile away down the road on her Honda Shadow!

Also works fantastic as a GPS-listening-device. I just pair it to my phone and fire up Google Maps or TomTom. And, like I tell folks, then I just go where the voices in my helmet tell me to go!
 

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I use my Garmin Nuvi 1450 on my bike. I just carry a plastic sandwich bag and some twist ties in case of rain. It has a RAM mount and is very easy to use. I've added a Kury Acc outlet to power it.
 

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Motorcycle GPS units are expensive, supposedly due to being highly water resistant, vibration resisistant and they have a brighter display than conventionaly GPS units. In general, they are designed so they can be operated with gloves.

I love my Zumo 550 and I use that logic to justify the extra $. However, some people on the forum buy cheaper used GPS units from Amazon or Craigslist for $100 or so, and just throw them out when they get wet or otherwise fail.
 

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I use my Garmin Nuvi 1450 on my bike. I just carry a plastic sandwich bag and some twist ties in case of rain. It has a RAM mount and is very easy to use. I've added a Kury Acc outlet to power it.
Sounds like Bear and I did the exact same thing, I would recommend some kind of sun shade or antiglare coating. A few times my GPS was completely blown out by the sun. I use the same unit for my car or bike and yeah a plastic baggie is all it takes. I use the Kury Powerpoint to juice it up also put a usb charger into it for the ipod touch or my phone.
 

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I use a Garmin nuvi2455 with lifetime maps; purchased from Costco for about $180. This unit also serves as my car GPS too.

I bought a case and mount from WallyWorld for about $15.

I like the Garmin on my bike because it works with gloves and it's reasonably bright in the sunlight.

I tried a Magellan, but I couldn't see it in the sun; and I didn't like the interface.

I think I may check out Roadie's set up with a BT adapter in the future though.

Scott
 

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Smart phones aren't always the best solution. They're great if you are riding locally, but Roaming charges add up real quick. When I'm riding in the States I use my Garmin... They now make one specifically for Bikes.

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=135&pID=65210

It even has a motorcycle Icon denoting your location.
Unless you buy one of the GPS apps that includes all of the maps. For example, I have "TomTom US&Canada" that includes maps, POI, basically everything an actual TomTom unit would have. I can run it with cellular data turned off! I use that, primarily because I'm not always somewhere where I have a signal. But, TomTom can find places, re-route, show me a map, etc. all without a cell signal because it stores all of that data locally.

On the poster who asked "why motorcycle specific". A few reasons.

One, most GPS units are touch screen. Not always great with gloved hands. Motorcycle specific ones are button operated with the buttons located on the left, so you could operate while riding if you were so inclined. They are also very waterproof (can handle a downpour) and have a bright screen. The screen Is a big thing. The reason I leave my phone in my pocket and just "listen" to the GPS is because I can't see the screen anyway. I have a handlebar mount, but I took it off. Except in the late evenings or at night, you can't see it.
 

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I've had a Garmin Zumo for about 8 years and it has been great on all my bikes. Waterproof, shock and vibration proof, glove friendly buttons and a touch screen. If it ever dies I will buy another Garmin motorcycle GPS -cant go wrong!


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Smart phones aren't always the best solution. They're great if you are riding locally, but Roaming charges add up real quick. When I'm riding in the States I use my Garmin... They now make one specifically for Bikes.

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=135&pID=65210

It even has a motorcycle Icon denoting your location.
Roaming Charges?, never paid any roaming changes for years, no longer applicable on Nationwide plans which 99 per cent of people use per lastes statistics you read by the big three carriers.

Plus Google Maps can be saved for off line use on the newer versions of Android, too.

Used my phone all over the US last year as my GPS on my Vaquero while traveling, from isolated mountain areas to desolate deserts.

Worked Great!
 

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Motorcycle specific ones are button operated with the buttons located on the left, so you could operate while riding if you were so inclined.
The Garmin Zumo devices use a touch screen that works just fine with gloves. There are no buttons on the side, the user interface is the same as a regular GPS.
 

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Sounds like Bear and I did the exact same thing, I would recommend some kind of sun shade or antiglare coating. A few times my GPS was completely blown out by the sun. I use the same unit for my car or bike and yeah a plastic baggie is all it takes. I use the Kury Powerpoint to juice it up also put a usb charger into it for the ipod touch or my phone.
Put another up for this hookup. Garmin 1490lmt/ram mount/powerpod II...
 

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Any suggestions on where to mount an accessory outlet? Looked all over the forum and the bike to find a good place but haven't found one yet. Also considering hacking up the cord and tapping into the headlight housing for a mini USB that would be able to power different devices.
 

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It depends on whether you'll leave it plugged in all the time.

I have a TAPP lite. It's a waterproof USB port. I have it direct to the battery (with inline fuse). The reason for that is I can charge my phone with the bike being off (even charging it for an hour won't drain the battery significantly). It works great, I had it mounted under my fuel tank with the charger running up into my tank bra pouch, but I'm going to relocate it to my tour-pak; that way I have a waterproof charging station. I can also charge my helmet cam, helmet Bluetooth, etc. works well. I'm also going to install a 12v accessory plug inside the tour pak for other accessories, though that'll be switched.

If its something you're going to leave plugged in all the time it needs to be switched. Where you splice in really depends on what you're powering. For example I, personally, wouldn't run heated gear on the headlight Circuit. Though what you could do is install a relay from the battery to the power plug, that is triggered by the headlight circuit!

The IDEAL solution is to never install anything on an occupied circuit. Instead, install a new fuse box with a relay on it. Direct to battery, relay tripped by perhaps the tail light. Then accessories, including your power outlet, will run into that fuse box. It'll be switched, it'll have the appropriate fuse for the application, it'll be safe, and it won't damage essential components. Imagine if you're going down the road at 10PM and your GPS pops your headlight fuse?

Something like this is the right idea;

http://www.cycleterminal.com/fuse-box-kits.html

Just install that and you'll have three switched accessory leads safe for chargers, gear, fog lamps, you name it. They also have a version with two switched and one hot. That's what I would use in my application if I was going to add something, because I like having one always hot USB port for charging my phone when the bike is off.
 
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