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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

My rear tire is getting thin and intend to buy a shinko tour master rear. The local shop charges $40 to change if I bring them the tire/wheel alone. I want to go this route; however, I only have a car jack to use. Is this doable? If so, how should I proceed w/o droping it? Thanks!
 

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The wife and I do this all the time. Use the floor jack with a piece of 1X4 or something long enough to reach from left to right. Make sure you clear any protrusions which would prevent the bike from sitting flush on the board. Have her sit on the bike and keep the front wheel straight as you slowly jack it up. Once up, we put a cinderblock with a small cut of plywood on top as a stand. We lower the jack just to the point where the bulk of the weight is supported by the block. Cycle Gear in Baton Rouge only charges $20, you may call a Cycle Gear if there's one near you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The wife and I do this all the time. Use the floor jack with a piece of 1X4 or something long enough to reach from left to right. Make sure you clear any protrusions which would prevent the bike from sitting flush on the board. Have her sit on the bike and keep the front wheel straight as you slowly jack it up. Once up, we put a cinderblock with a small cut of plywood on top as a stand. We lower the jack just to the point where the bulk of the weight is supported by the block. Cycle Gear in Baton Rouge only charges $20, you may call a Cycle Gear if there's one near you.
Thanks for the tip! That'll do nicely. Sadly, I don't have a Cycle Gear in Kansas.
 

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Pirelli tires are 40% off at some places. The money saved might be close to what you would pay to have someone do it for you...
 

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That is what I do also. if you have to do it on your own then put you a block under the high side of the frame so when you start to lift it will start to lay over on the block. Afer you start get it even or a little past even but still stable, block that side up then you will have to walk it up the blocks with the jack. it is a little time consuming but it will get you there. I usually get the wife or neighbor or even a set of tie down straps hooked to the roof of my car port (its made form .250 wall steel pipe. not your average car port) to help steady it while I lift it. Then let the weight of the weight rest of the blocks.

Do you have a classic or custom.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That is what I do also. if you have to do it on your own then put you a block under the high side of the frame so when you start to lift it will start to lay over on the block. Afer you start get it even or a little past even but still stable, block that side up then you will have to walk it up the blocks with the jack. it is a little time consuming but it will get you there. I usually get the wife or neighbor or even a set of tie down straps hooked to the roof of my car port (its made form .250 wall steel pipe. not your average car port) to help steady it while I lift it. Then let the weight of the weight rest of the blocks.

Do you have a classic or custom.
It's a custom.
 

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ok. that will make it easier. You won't have to jack the bike to the moon or take the rear fender off to get the tire and wheel out from under it.
 

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good tip. Not only for tire alignment but belt tension too.
 

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The wife and I do this all the time. Use the floor jack with a piece of 1X4 or something long enough to reach from left to right. Make sure you clear any protrusions which would prevent the bike from sitting flush on the board. Have her sit on the bike and keep the front wheel straight as you slowly jack it up. Once up, we put a cinderblock with a small cut of plywood on top as a stand. We lower the jack just to the point where the bulk of the weight is supported by the block. Cycle Gear in Baton Rouge only charges $20, you may call a Cycle Gear if there's one near you.
I screwed together two 2x8's and drilled a 1" hole in one end just off-center like the video and it works great. I just put something heavy on the handle if I need to run it while on the stand. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUJmWU63jfg
 

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Hey wisecracker
There is a Cycle Gear in Lenexa....not that close to either of us, but I've been in the store and they've got a lot of gear. And the guys workin there know their stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Finally got around to getting the rear tire off. Wasn't too hard. I built a quick lift using 2x 2"x8"x2' boards bolted together using 3.5 inch long x 1/4 bolts inch with fender washers. For the pipe, I bought a floor mount and mounted it using 4 more 3.5 inch by 1/4 inch bolts. Worked really well! Now, I am waiting for the shop to mount and balance. Might get it back tonight or tomorrow.
 

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I recently replaced both tires with shinko. Price could not be beat and I'm happy with performance and look. Also, it was worth it to let the shop replace them.
 

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let us know how long the Shinko's last. rumor has it that it does not last long. i'm personally thinking about Metzler. if the Metz last twice as long it might be better to drop a little extra $$$ now instead of replacing every year. my $.02
 

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let us know how long the Shinko's last. rumor has it that it does not last long. i'm personally thinking about Metzler. if the Metz last twice as long it might be better to drop a little extra $$$ now instead of replacing every year. my $.02
I can't argue with your logic but I got the Shiko's at less than half the price of the Metzlers (WW vs WW) so if I have to replace them twice as often I'm still money ahead. The big thing I'm going to be looking at is if the ride quality lasts. So far it's great but I only have about 1500 miles on them.
 

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I have often wondered about Shiko, kenda, ... brands of tires. I have never ran them and mostly heard not so flattering things about them except the folks that only ride a few thousand miles each year. I have been curious but not curious enough to try them. Its a moot point for me now since neither of them make a 200/60/16 anyway.
 

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Have you checked other local shops or dealerships?

One smaller local shop here charges $40 to change a tire ON THE BIKE, I'm actually able to ride in, hand them the tire, and they'll change it. (Except on Goldwings and certain Harley touring models, which are more). It's free if you buy the tire from them, which usually negates any savings from buying online. (In my case, I got a good deal getting tires from a forum member who had 'stocked up' but then sold their 900, which is the only reason I don't just buy the tires from them)

You might shop around and find a place that'll change it for you, on the bike, for $40. I think this shop only charges like $15 or $20 if you bring the rim in. You might also call CAR tire places, and see if they'll mount it on a rim you bring in cheaper. (It's a very similar process!)

Maybe prices are different but $40 seems high for a tire change when you bring in the rim. 90% of the work is done!
 
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