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Administrator "Loose Nut"
Houston, Texas
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Often when someone asks a question we reply to check this part, then check this one, etc. Issue is, some folks don't know what the part looks like. Most of y'all know I'm in the automotive supply field, logistical side, but have a warehouse full of parts. Most automotive parts and motorcycle parts look a lot alike. I going to post pictures of part and would like y'all to guess what it is. If @BlueRibbonRM and other techs hold off some before answering that would be great, y'all should know, possibly throw a hint to what it is. I will be taking these pictures at random and post a new one with discription of previous part as they are identified correctly. Here's the first one:

248526
 

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2020 Kawasaki Vulcan S, 2020 Kawasaki Z900
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How long do we hold off before making a guess? If that's what I am thinking then it has to do with a certain systems pressure....
 

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Administrator "Loose Nut"
Houston, Texas
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Let's say at least a day before you name it. Your hint is correct.
 

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That's a dohickymajigger.
 

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Administrator "Loose Nut"
Houston, Texas
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nope.
Hint: all injected bikes, cars too, have one.
 

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Administrator "Loose Nut"
Houston, Texas
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You are correct.

What is a Fuel Pressure Regulator and how does it work?
A fuel pressure regulator is used to maintain steady fuel supply, even during dramatic changes in fuel demand. The fuel injector has two sides: one side of the injector is under pressure from the the fuel rail and the other side is air boosted by a turbo or a compressor. Ideal ratio is a 1:1 ratio. The fuel pressure regulator regulates the fuel pressure against the air pressure/boost, which enables the fuel injector to maintain the perfect ratio between fuel and boost.
The fuel pressure regulator consist of a diaphragm that controls the bypass valve “ball seat” and as the picture below illustrates it can open and close in order to adjust itself for a steady fuel delivery.
When pressure (boost) is applied to the top of the regulator, the diaphragm, which is attached to the bypass valve, a spring forces the diaphragm down and reduces the amount of excess fuel, this makes the fuel pumps work harder while the fuel pressure increases linearly towards the increasing boost pressure from the intake manifold.

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Just changed one of those so I won't say anything other than that motor runs so much better now.
 
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