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Took the MSF course in October, went out after passing the course and promptly laid my bike down in a slow left turn. Spent the rest of the winter recovering (my foot was bruised and swollen for a while) and fixing up the damage. Just finished a 'Saddle Time' course, jumped right on my bike and rode it around for 11 miles and had a blast. Very glad to have the Vulcan 800 classic and excited that I was finally able to get "it" (riding) right!
 

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Congrats. Sorry for the spill however it happens to a lot of us. Glad you're OK now. Take it easy, respect the road surfaces and your bikes limitations. More so, respect yours. Your skill level will improve with experience and in the meantime take small adventurous steps, enjoy and learn a bit with every ride...
 

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+1 what Bear said above.

Even though I had ridden several bikes for years as a kid, when I started riding again five or so years ago, I found that taking the class was very helpful. I also found that everytime I rode for at least the first two years, I would learn something and gain better control and skill. I still learn more and more, and gain more confidence each time I ride. The key word is RESPECT. RESPECT the machine. RESPECT the road.
 

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A low speed spill is far better than a high speed spill.
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Just be careful and ride for a long, long time.
 

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We all go down, just keep hopping on her and riding, especially slow manuvers,. and it will be second nature
 

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I rode as a young person, then got married, had kids, and between the wife nagging and no money, I quit for a long time. Then about 15 years ago the kids were grown, and I started again. Best thing I did was take lessons from a private instructor. Then as I rode more I learned more. I still learn things everytime I ride and I enjoy the rides more each time. The key is to not over ride your abilities and learn from your mistakes.
 

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35 years of riding and a few spills ,love it
had a good spill last year when some wanker in spilled diesel on a round about ,i hit it at 80klm slid a around the road watching the bike get damaged ,took a 2 months to get back on (mainly because the bike was getting repaired ) but best thing i did was get back on ,shacks you up a bit and makes you more aware of every thing .
enjoy the ride and learn from all around
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So this just happened...

Today I watched a guy on a ninja make a right turn from a stop and put too much power to the rear wheel. Fish-tailed badly, over-corrected and went down. Luckily the cars behind him saw what was happening and give him room for his moment.
 

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I'm being coached by my brother who has ridden almost daily for most of his life and has only laid it down once. He was in a parking lot doing about 15 mph in a turn hitting a spot of radiator fluid. I rode a Yamaha 80 as a kid and now 30 years later am riding again. Rode my brothers Suzuki Volusia 800 for a while until getting a great deal on my 99 VN 1500 Nomad G. It has taken some getting used to the weight of it. We have spent a lot of time doing serpentines and quick stops in vacant parking lots and lots of time on quiet country back roads. Today he took me on my first short jaunt on a major freeway with mild traffic. What a blast! The wind was blowing hard and at 75 mph the bike remained smooth and steady. I noticed my brother was wavering a bit on his 800 ahead of me. I see where it pays to stay within my riding ability.
 

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Pick up the book Proficient Motorcycling by David Hough. Can't recommend this book enough for all riders as it will teach you skills to not only ride better and understand the dynamics of riding also but how to survive on the streets. Always under $20 on Amazon.com
 

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Welcome and my advice to you is to take a MSF course. I understand that you are being coached by lifelong riders but that said I too rode when I was young, long before MSF courses were around. After some time riding without incident back then I thought I knew pretty much everything there was to riding. Fast forward 30 years to today. I wanted to get a bike and pick up riding again so this time I enrolled in the MSF course to see what they had to offer me. Admittedly so, the first part of the course was a little slow since they start the classes out at square one but I kept an open mind and I assure you, I learned a few new things that will stick with me for life. Try it!
 

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I agree. I'm taking an MSF course within a couple weeks. Also ordered the dvd Ride Like a Pro and the book Proficient Motorcycling, both forum member recommendations.
 

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It's a great feeling being in the wind, those first few miles back on the bike. Wish you many more safe ones to come. And a gorgeous part of the country to be riding in, this time of year especially. The Dakotas! :cowboy:
 

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Took the MSF course in October, went out after passing the course and promptly laid my bike down in a slow left turn./QUOTE]
I took a riders course in 1972, ya I've been riding for some years. We rode on Honda 125's for the course and the drivers test, it was a breeze.
Got home and hopped on my bike (Honda CB350) which I had never ridden on the street, drove to the end of the lane and nearly crashed into a wall. Started off again and needed to turn left, went up over the curb, nearly lost it again. Started off once more and putt putt putted my way to where I was going, people blowing their horns at me to speed up.
Taking the courses is great to learn what to do, getting used to the size of the bike you are riding is a whole other thing. Take your time, get familiar with your ride, going fast isn't fun if you can't handle the bike. And take nothing for granted.;)
 

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Took the MSF course in October, went out after passing the course and promptly laid my bike down in a slow left turn./QUOTE]
I took a riders course in 1972, ya I've been riding for some years. We rode on Honda 125's for the course and the drivers test, it was a breeze.
Got home and hopped on my bike (Honda CB350) which I had never ridden on the street, drove to the end of the lane and nearly crashed into a wall. Started off again and needed to turn left, went up over the curb, nearly lost it again. Started off once more and putt putt putted my way to where I was going, people blowing their horns at me to speed up.
Taking the courses is great to learn what to do, getting used to the size of the bike you are riding is a whole other thing. Take your time, get familiar with your ride, going fast isn't fun if you can't handle the bike. And take nothing for granted.;)
Everyone should take the msf IMO. Afterward, you really should practice what you learned in an open parking lot on the bike your going to ride before going out onto the street in traffic..
 

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That's very true. I took the MSF course on a little 250. Felt like I was riding a mini-bike. The course had it's challenging moments but I never laid the bike down as apparently many had in the past according to the many big dents and scratches on it.

It will be a while before I can make those same moves on my 1500. Lots of practice on the menu.
 
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