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Have any of you tried to replace tires on these with hand tools? I was contemplating it till the new tire came in and is really stiff.
 

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I have done all my own for about 4 years now. I use 3 tire irons to pry the tire on and off once I get the bead broke. An old milk jug cut into strips can be used to protect the rim. Also remove the valve stem completely. When I mount the new tire, I coat the tire bead lightly with GoJo as a lubricant, makes it easier to slide on, and takes less pressure to seat the bead once you air it up. I also do this with the valve removed, then installed stem and set my pressure.
 

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I have done all my own for about 4 years now. I use 3 tire irons to pry the tire on and off once I get the bead broke. An old milk jug cut into strips can be used to protect the rim. Also remove the valve stem completely. When I mount the new tire, I coat the tire bead lightly with GoJo as a lubricant, makes it easier to slide on, and takes less pressure to seat the bead once you air it up. I also do this with the valve removed, then installed stem and set my pressure.
+1. Exactly what I do. Old oil qt bottles or tide jugs work too. The plastic is thicker.
 

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I've done it with dual sports and cars/trucks, but not my Vulcan. One thing I have found that can be pretty handy is connecting a vacuum pump to the valve stem. You'll still have to brake one of the beads yourself, but the vacuum will take care of the first one for you.
 

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For a bead breaker, I have one like this but been modified a bit.

 

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tire changing

I've always used hand tools to change all my tires. Just recently bought a tire machine. Still use a large vise to break the bead and tire tools to dismount and mount the tire on the 800. Valve stems are tricky and like to replace the rubber band on the rim.
 

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If you have some scrap lumber around you can do it the way I do: get a piece of 2x6 maybe 6' or so (longer gives you more leverage) and insert one end of it under something heavy (I use the frame of my travel trailer). Put a shorter piece of wood on the tire bead as if it was the fulcrum of a lever, rest the 2x6 on it and then press down on the free end of the 2x6. One of three things is going to happen: the 2x6 will break, the trailer will lift up, or the bead will pop. So far the bead has always yielded first.:)
 

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I've changed tires in a myriad of ways throughout my life. The first was to cut the tire with an axe. But after 6 months in a war zone a bead breaker came into my life. All I did was fix big truck tires for duration. I like changing tires now. You can always run over the edge of rim with a vehicle on automobile wheels. The best way for motorcycle tires is the big vice. You can put the work exactly where you need to squeeze and not damage the rim. Just the tire. Using a lube is helpful. It helps when changing again. I have a vacuum pump but only use tube type tires and don't see the applicability. There are many ways to change tires. Looks like we are all tight on money but paying some one is the easiest.
 

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A trick I learned from an old tire changer was this, he would keep a can of Crisco grease handy and he would stick a paper towell in it and run it around the inside beads of the tire to help it go on the rim. He told me to never use any kind of oil that had mineral oil in it as this would deteriorate the rubber but the vegetable oil would not and would wash right off. I like that vacuum pump trick.
 

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I got these from harbor freight. I understand that they no longer offer the motorcycle tire changer. Ive modified the tire changer to suite me and I use a "no-mar-bar" which wont scratch the rim. I used to use the tire spoons to change tires like when I rode dirt bikes but found this to be 10 times faster.

Tim :cool:



 

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I got these from harbor freight. I understand that they no longer offer the motorcycle tire changer. Ive modified the tire changer to suite me and I use a "no-mar-bar" which wont scratch the rim. I used to use the tire spoons to change tires like when I rode dirt bikes but found this to be 10 times faster.

Tim :cool:



They had it as of 2 months ago at my "local" harbor freight in Johnson City, Tn.
 

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They had it as of 2 months ago at my "local" harbor freight in Johnson City, Tn.

Thats great. I have a friend who has been wanting to get his own. I will let him know. :good:

Tim :cool:
 

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BTW I know you mentioned it above, but to everyone else I also second getting another bar. The one that comes with the HF changer is just painted steel. Not good on the rims. I believe they cost around +-$125.
 
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