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Discussion Starter #1
Posting here since this part of Vulcan Forums deals with modifying.
Looking for advice or right direction pointers.

painting my tank and two fenders. stripping to bare metal at this time.
i want to paint orange on the top and half way down blend to a dark red.
not going to have a $1000 custom paint job done, but not going to use a brush and house paint either. LOL
I have an oil-less compressor and a couple of guns, one is low pressure - but i'm no painter - much more comfortable with mechanical.

trying to come up with a plan for Primer, then base colors (and how to do that blend of fade-to), and a durable clear coat. i understand it is "a system" where they all wok together.

any advice or places to look for advice would be appreciated
 

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I used to paint back in the 70s and 80s but everything's changed so much. Back then I would have said use acrylic lacquers for your color-coats and blends, followed with 2-part urethane clear. You definitely still want to do a basecoat/clearcoat system but today I'm not sure if you can even get lacquers. You'll probably have to use polyester base colors, though the new water borne base colors also work well. Same process though, get the blends where you like then clear overall to seal and shine. When I have to paint now I buy small quantities of color and clear from a body shop, and apply them with a basic HVLP gravity gun. Not all shops will be willling to sell you anything so be ready to kiss up a little - 6-packs may be involved.
 

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Repainted my 800 a couple year ago. Bought all my paint ad clear from the same atou body supply store. They recommended a white primer that I got in rattle cans, 2-3. Paint was around $45, but the clear was about $140 a qt.. a good clear will make the job, dont scimp here, it was a 2 part lus thinner. they were pretty helpful in advice along the way. Vrey important to have clean enviroment with temps around 75-80 degrees. Good luck. was my 1st time and turned out pretty good I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I used to paint back in the 70s and 80s but everything's changed so much. Back then I would have said use acrylic lacquers for your color-coats and blends, followed with 2-part urethane clear. You definitely still want to do a basecoat/clearcoat system but today I'm not sure if you can even get lacquers. You'll probably have to use polyester base colors, though the new water borne base colors also work well. Same process though, get the blends where you like then clear overall to seal and shine. When I have to paint now I buy small quantities of color and clear from a body shop, and apply them with a basic HVLP gravity gun. Not all shops will be willling to sell you anything so be ready to kiss up a little - 6-packs may be involved.
Thanks for the tips id-man. I like the body shop idea!.
there is an real honest to goodness auto body paint supply house not far from me - going saturday to see what they have. hitting my buddies up to see if they can help secure at least the clear coat.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Repainted my 800 a couple year ago. Bought all my paint ad clear from the same atou body supply store. They recommended a white primer that I got in rattle cans, 2-3. Paint was around $45, but the clear was about $140 a qt.. a good clear will make the job, dont scimp here, it was a 2 part lus thinner. they were pretty helpful in advice along the way. Vrey important to have clean enviroment with temps around 75-80 degrees. Good luck. was my 1st time and turned out pretty good I think.
Thanks Rick
yea, i had an idea the clear coat was important. didn't know it was that kind of money, but you're right, not skimping that part.
i think i have a few more weeks with temps in the 70's and 80's here. i'm just north of Daytona Beach, FL.
 

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I have seen on Velocity channel a new product out which is 2 part clear in a rattle can. You get about an hour "potlife" after you release a valve that mixes the 2 parts together. If memory serves it was about $75 and supposedly sprayed a decent coat...I just don't recall a brand name or where it was sold. I'm skeptical but it could be a viable alternative for someone who didn't have access to a spray gun or paint supplier. I presume you can get basecoats in aerosol too, which should be fIne for solids or normal 2-tones, though I'd hate to have to achieve a decent blend using them.
 

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Have had great results with some of the new rattle can paints (tip: run under hot water first for better atomization), color sand and coat with SprayMax 2K 2 part clear which is fuel resistant and costs under $20.
 

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That stuff looks great - under $20 where? Coverage isn't too much (about a square yard) but enough to do a tank or a couple fenders...I can dig it. There are times in my business a 2-k clear would be great in the field. I'll no doubt try this some time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Have had great results with some of the new rattle can paints (tip: run under hot water first for better atomization), color sand and coat with SprayMax 2K 2 part clear which is fuel resistant and costs under $20.
I'm liking the 20 bucks. LOL
fuel resistant is a big need with the tank...

what makes it "2K" ?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Question with the clear coat.

is that going to be multiple coats?
always though multiple coats made the color look "deep" which should look cool.
 

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Question with the clear coat.

is that going to be multiple coats?
always though multiple coats made the color look "deep" which should look cool.
A quality 2k clear coat should be shot at least 3 coats. The CC instructions should state how many coats should be shot. I used U-pol with the Omni base on my Skylark 3 years ago and have no complaints on the base or clear.

This is a less expensive option and many will say these will not last but I have no complaints.
 

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1 can should do it, I bought 2 the first time and only used 1. It's got a 3 yr shelf life, I think. You have 24 hours once you mix it in the can. There are good instructions and youtube videos. Takes 2=3 coats. Here's where I bought mine from:
Spraymax 2k
 

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When I bought my clear, they had a more expensive one, but they said it was used mainly by collision repair shops because it can be polish/buffed 15 minutes after spraying. The downside is its not real durable, looks good at 1st, but only last a couple years. I sprayed 2 coats with crushed pearl and 2 coats of pure clear. Your final coat should be as heavy as possible, without runs.
 

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When I bought my clear, they had a more expensive one, but they said it was used mainly by collision repair shops because it can be polish/buffed 15 minutes after spraying. The downside is its not real durable, looks good at 1st, but only last a couple years. I sprayed 2 coats with crushed pearl and 2 coats of pure clear. Your final coat should be as heavy as possible, without runs.
Yeah, that final coat is the crucial one. By that 3rd coat, you should be able to gauge how heavy to apply it. I found one of the most valuable techniques to master was this one:



Starting and ending each stroke off the panel, keeping a consistent distance while moving the can/gun across the panel and covering 50% of the previous stroke with the next. Sounds easy and like common sense, but it's something that takes practice and makes all the difference in the world.
 

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Just a quick note on clear, make sure it's an oil/gas resistant 2 part clear. Otherwise, all your hard work will be gone the first time you spill some gas on the tank. Oil/gas resistant clears last a lot longer anyway, they can put up with all the nasty pollution and stuff the paint deals with.

It's also my understanding that once clear is dry, you can't add any more? Can someone confirm that? If that's the case, you'd wanna make sure you're prepared to do all of your clear at once (but you probably WILL have to wait some time in between coats to let it get tacky)

If you have a nice, thick clearcoat I think you increase the risk of orange peel, but orange peel is correctable, and a thick clearcoat is a nice 'canvas' for removing scratches and things down the road. Factory paints on a car, including primer, color, and clear combined, are thinner than a post-it note!
 

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Just a quick note on clear, make sure it's an oil/gas resistant 2 part clear. Otherwise, all your hard work will be gone the first time you spill some gas on the tank. Oil/gas resistant clears last a lot longer anyway, they can put up with all the nasty pollution and stuff the paint deals with.

It's also my understanding that once clear is dry, you can't add any more? Can someone confirm that? If that's the case, you'd wanna make sure you're prepared to do all of your clear at once (but you probably WILL have to wait some time in between coats to let it get tacky)

If you have a nice, thick clearcoat I think you increase the risk of orange peel, but orange peel is correctable, and a thick clearcoat is a nice 'canvas' for removing scratches and things down the road. Factory paints on a car, including primer, color, and clear combined, are thinner than a post-it note!
the clear we are talking about is fuel resistant.

In the directions there is a time period in which you can color sand and apply another coat or else you have to wait another period of time. It's all in the instructions.
 

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the clear we are talking about is fuel resistant.

In the directions there is a time period in which you can color sand and apply another coat or else you have to wait another period of time. It's all in the instructions.
Ah, cool!

Looking forward to pics!
 

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I worked at a GM dealer body shop for 5 years doing both body work and painting, i still do body/paint work on the side, and have been doing it for 15+ years. Prep work such as sanding the final coat of primer and cleaning the parts before you start painting makes a paintjob. Get a 6" sanding block and block your parts with400 grit sandpaper, then wet sand them with 500 grit. after that scuff them with a grey scotchbrite pad and some scuffing agent. wash them REALLY well, then blow all the water out of the cracks/crevaces. When you wash the parts, wash the underside of them just as well as the parts that are being painted. before you start painting use a pre paint degreaser and lint free towel (scotts shop towels work great) and clean the parts 2 times(you cant get them too clean). If there is any grease form your hands on the parts when you paint them it will cause fish eyes in the paint, so dont touch them after you clean them. Use all the same brand for paint and clear, they are made to work togather and sometimes different brands dont get along. Take your time and it will come out good.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ah, cool!

Looking forward to pics!
i'll get a link up with some pix.
all the responses so far have helped a bunch getting a wrench mechanic an idea of finish. Maybe someday I can get some paint on my Challenger, but for today I can at least go to the auto body store and speak in some logical manner when I ask questions! LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I worked at a GM dealer body shop for 5 years doing both body work and painting, i still do body/paint work on the side, and have been doing it for 15+ years. Prep work such as sanding the final coat of primer and cleaning the parts before you start painting makes a paintjob. Get a 6" sanding block and block your parts with400 grit sandpaper, then wet sand them with 500 grit. after that scuff them with a grey scotchbrite pad and some scuffing agent. wash them REALLY well, then blow all the water out of the cracks/crevaces. When you wash the parts, wash the underside of them just as well as the parts that are being painted. before you start painting use a pre paint degreaser and lint free towel (scotts shop towels work great) and clean the parts 2 times(you cant get them too clean). If there is any grease form your hands on the parts when you paint them it will cause fish eyes in the paint, so dont touch them after you clean them. Use all the same brand for paint and clear, they are made to work togather and sometimes different brands dont get along. Take your time and it will come out good.

YES! clean, clean and clean again. Same deal as when rebuilding a carb or an engine. Getting tons of great info here in this forum. Thanks!
 
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