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He said he used this method on over 300 engines with no ill effects?

What about the millions of engines made every year that do not use this method and live long happy lives?
 

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I did that with a 1600 classic I had the engine rebuilt on and it worked well for me. Ran like a mad dog until I sold it a couple of years later.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This video from Motorcycle magazine, where they take two engines that they replaced top end and broke them in completely diff. One per manual, easy rpm. Then another at/near redline for the entire 1000 miles. All measurements indicated basically no diff??

 

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I used to overhaul diesel engines. Had this argument all of the time! I wanted the new rings, mains, and caps to "seat" properly. The freight haulers needed the truck. The conversation usually went, "If you did it right, what better way to test it, than to put it on the road?". I would agree with the boss, then get the driver privately and say, " It's your decision - you can make good time by running this fresh engine all-out. Or, you can take it easy the first 500. How much 'Down-Time' can you afford, if I have to go back into that engine?". I knew I did good work-I never had a comeback engine. Chances were good that my overhaul would hold-up, either way. If it didn't, I would still have a 'Come-Back' against me, either way. The boss wouldn't care and I'ld still be in trouble and lose my commission. I then left it up to the driver to decide!
The question is; "How much are you willing to gamble on that brand new engine?". Most manufacturers ask that you go easy on the top-end, and vary the engine speeds (up and down), for the first few miles. I would then replace the oil and filter after the first thousand miles. After that, " Ride it like Ya stole it!"
 

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Iv had three brand-new cars the dealers did not say anything about breaking new engine all they said just it easy for a few miles let tyres and brakes bed in.

On all three of those cars I drove round the shops did about 10 20 mile ,then off on holiday ,drove at speeds of road 70mph and a bit more ,
I had no trouble at all.

ive got two Kawasaki bikes, dealer said just drive normally ,so on our uk roads speeds are 30 40 50 60 and 70 mph so just doing a commute bike is working thru rev range

cant really see what all the fuss is about, ,but its difficult to stay below 4000 revs on the 400 ninja ,I also have a big triumph now breaking in is 5000 to 6000 revs which give around 70 mph so its easy
 

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I'm glad you haven't had any problems with your vehicles, during break-in. Manufacturers have improved the engines over the years. The type of engine also makes a difference. Some use needle bearings in their crankshafts, some use brass, some use pocket bearings, etc. Power bands vary widely. A motorcycle capable of a 10k redline is different than a diesel with a 4k redline. All that said, the bottom line is, nobody makes or rebuilds an engine that they intend to fail, if not broken in. Everyone (hopefully) has confidence in their final product. A salesman is not as versed in engineering, as the factory engineering team. So, what do we do? Ignore the R & D Teams for the manufacturer? Fail to read the factory Owners Manual for that particular machine? Maybe it will say, "No Break-In required". Great-have at it. But to say, "Since I had no problems, everyone can ignore the break in procedures" isn't logical. That's me - my investment is valuable to me. I see no need to risk, even a 1% chance on ignoring the advice of the very people who designed and manufactured the machine.
 

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Have a load of mates with bikes none run in, or break in as you call it, bikes as hand book says

MY ninja 400 breaking in as handbooks is at all good in our traffic

We possibly have a lot more traffic than you do lour country is tiny compared to yours ,you have to go over break in rules just to keep with traffic
ITS ok if you want to run as book says, good luck to you have fun ,nothing wrong with it
 

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Oh yeah, may be a little different where you are. Definitely better to work through the gear range, than getting on the interstate and blasting away for hours. People can get a little impatient with you, if you aren't at least going the speed limit (or over)!
 

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Oh yeah, may be a little different where you are. Definitely better to work through the gear range, than getting on the interstate and blasting away for hours. People can get a little impatient with you, if you aren't at least going the speed limit (or over)!
Yes they can and do ,if we took bike on our motorways we would not be keeping with traffic,
we would be in lefthand lane and in the middle of 40ton trucks travelling at 60 plus mph ,they are limited to 60mph but a few do more than that

you have to be going 70 to 80 mph to get out the road of them, other end being sandwich filling,.

Nice to chat to you Keith
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So would people recommend after the first ~800KM using regular non Synthetic oil to change? Then when could or should i start using synthetic on a new bike?
 

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I tried AmsOil synthetic years ago on one of my GoldWings. They made a flush that supposedly prepared the engine for a "fresh start", using synthetic from then-on. I saw no benefit. I had a Road Glide that had Harley's synthetic in the transmission. 4th gear was a little noisy, so I went back to petroleum gear lube-noise went away. Talked to other guys with 5 speed H.D. and they agreed. I have used synthetic on vehicles I was servicing professionally, the customers requested it. Overall, I would say start it right after your initial break-in (first oil change), if you want. I personally see no benefit to it. Longer oil change intervals, maybe. I don't feel comfortable leaving my oil in the bike after 3kk, so I just use Dinosaur oil.
 

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new motors are tight, the nuts and bolts are tight, the last thing you want to do is take a new motor and run it hard, go easy with it for the 1st 1,000 miles until all things inside settle in
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I tried AmsOil synthetic years ago on one of my GoldWings. They made a flush that supposedly prepared the engine for a "fresh start", using synthetic from then-on. I saw no benefit. I had a Road Glide that had Harley's synthetic in the transmission. 4th gear was a little noisy, so I went back to petroleum gear lube-noise went away. Talked to other guys with 5 speed H.D. and they agreed. I have used synthetic on vehicles I was servicing professionally, the customers requested it. Overall, I would say start it right after your initial break-in (first oil change), if you want. I personally see no benefit to it. Longer oil change intervals, maybe. I don't feel comfortable leaving my oil in the bike after 3kk, so I just use Dinosaur oil.
So much info out there.... Information overload. Some say do some don't.. I was not sure whether i should use synthetic from first oil change or some people say first the valves need to set which would be after first oil change before using synthetic..
 

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So much info out there.... Information overload. Some say do some don't.. I was not sure whether i should use synthetic from first oil change or some people say first the valves need to set which would be after first oil change before using synthetic..
Yes, there are many varied opinions on oil! If you are worried about it - don't use synthetic. I don't, but that's because I have confidence in regular petroleum, and I change oil frequently. If you really think synthetic is a better way to go - use it, but I was saying I would leave the regular oil in it UNTIL you were ready for that first oil change. Then, do what you want.
 

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I don't know which way is better but I typically have never made the xxxx miles before I ran it hard.

I did work with a guy who got into drag car racing and went to some shop that builds and sells drag engines. He went there and went through their build school. He said that after the drag engine was given adequate time to warm up they put it on the dyno and went to full throttle several times to get their readings. Now since it was a race engine maybe it was built for that, I don't know.
 
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