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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody here running a Mikuni (or other) carb on their V2K? My FI works great - for now - but my bike is bone stock, which is soon to change.

I enjoy tuning carbs more than FI, and since my V2K is a toy, fun is where it's at for me!

Just curious if anyone started having FI troubles and said "Adios" to the whole rats nest and bolted on an honest carburetor.

What did you do for ignition?

I know FI is better than caburetion, but a 4-cylinder in-line is better than a V-twin too, so it's not all about what's better.
 

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Anybody here running a Mikuni (or other) carb on their V2K? My FI works great - for now - but my bike is bone stock, which is soon to change.

I enjoy tuning carbs more than FI, and since my V2K is a toy, fun is where it's at for me!

Just curious if anyone started having FI troubles and said "Adios" to the whole rats nest and bolted on an honest carburetor.
No I am not running a carb, but like you say its your toy and you can do what you like. You can always put it back to FI if it doesn't work out.
I Used this formula back in the old days when I fitted quite a few Holley Carbs to V8s and 6 cyls, it gives you the MAX CFM (cubic feet per minute) of air that a motor can suck in. Then you just get a carby that has that air flow, don't go bigger than you need to with carbys. eg: Holleys are rated in CFM, a 500 Holley is 500 CFM.
Ok so this is formula,
125cubic inch X 5200 rpm = 650,000 Now divide 650,000 by 3456 = 188 CFM.
Now I minus another 10% off that 188CFM to allow for volumetric losses, VE, you never get full amount of air into a motor, there is restrictions like air cleaner, manifolds, heads and valves etc.
So I minus 10% off that 188CFM which = 169CFM.
So look for a Carby that flows as close to 169 CFM and you will be very close to it being perfect size for the motor. Then you can just tweak the jetting.

What did you do for ignition?
I would LOVE to be able to tweak the Ignition timing on this beast, there is so much more in this motor. I am talking to a company at the moment that has the stuff to be able to tune your OEM ECU, they are seeing if the 2000 will work with there gear. I hope so.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Cfm

Thanks for the info.

Mikuni's webpage recommends the 48mm carb for big-inch v-twins like the V2K. They don't actually rate the carb in cfm for some reason, just bore dia. But a lot of big-inch Harleys run them, so they must be about right.

My FI works flawlessly, so I won't be changing it any time soon. I just wondered if anyone has done it.
 

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where in west tx are ya doomer? El Paso here.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
El Paso and drag pipes.

Yup. Don't see many V2K's around here.

I'm running straight drag pipes right now. Got some glasspacks like Poncho runs, but before I put 'em on I took it for a ride around the block and when I got back I just couldn't bring myself to put those glasspacks on. Stuck some extensions on the ends of the stock pipes to get them exiting back around the rear axle and unless I have some kind of problems with them, I think I just "cured" my exhaust problem.

Most people are really down on drag pipes, but:

1) The volume is adjustable with the throttle. At cruise they just make a nice rumble. Around town, with the little throttle you need to get the V2K up to the speed limit, noise is not a big issue. Crack that throttle open and you release some serious decibels. It screams "HEY THERE'S A MOTORCYCLE HERE!!" I don't know about the town you ride in, but around here, it's handy to be able to get some drivers attention.

I let my bike warm up at idle in the morning, I don't go revving it at wot just to impress the neighbors. Also, I actually TALK to my neighbors. That's right! I can ask them if the bike bothers them, and if it does, I'll fix it. Just like guns don't make criminals, drag pipes don't make inconsiderate as***les.

2) Drag pipes cost you midrange power and give you a little bit more top end. The net change is a loss: you lose more midrange than you gain top end (with a stock engine). So your bike won't accelerate as hard in the midrange with drag pipes. I have never understood this argument. Who tries to accelerate hard in the midrange? Makes no sense. If you are trying to accelerate as hard as possible, you need to be putting peak engine power to the rear wheel, no? That's what the transmission is for.

I guess the argument is that you should be able to achieve maximum acceleration in any gear by simply twisting the throttle wide open, which also makes no sense. There is such a thing as being in the wrong gear. Why do people even talk about "roll-on" acceleration? Too lazy or uncoordinated to downshift? Admittedly, the shifter on the V2K isn't optimized for flicking through the gears, but that can be fixed.

3) Drag pipes are the lightest, cheapest exhaust you can have. No argument here. You can save a LOT of weight going to a set of drag pipes. It is also very easy to tuck them up out of the way, if you can cut and weld a little, that is.

So maybe the next time you see a bike with drag pipes, you won't immediately conclude that the rider is an inconsiderate jerk who is too stupid to know all the power he's losing running those pipes.
 
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