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Discussion Starter #1
General consensus of the usual suspects at various local bike-nights (and probably a majority of riders who contribute to this forum) are that Shinko (S. Korean) and Kenda (“mostly” Chinese from what I can gather) and IRC (Japanese) are low end, cheapo tires not to be taken seriously by the I-ride-hard crowd. Based on the many recommendations on this forum, I just replaced my OEM front with a Michelin Commander. Country of manufacture – Thailand . Am sure the significant, extra cost of the Michelin is due to the superior engineering, choice of components, and company’s manufacturing standards…Right??? I see more and more riders going with Shinko tires on some very expensive scoots and it makes me wonder if they know something I don’t. I experienced the most consistent tire wear with Dunlop Elite III’s on my Wing but the longest wearing tires I’ve ever had were IRC’s on my Boulevard. There’s an average price swing of $45 between the “comparable” Shinko and Michelin fronts. IF you do the math AND you get 20% LESS tread life with the Shinko, you’re still $$ ahead with the Shinko by the 3rd tire change. With the exception of the IRC’s, I’ve always used one of the Big 3 on my bikes – Dunlop, Bridgestone or Michelin (maybe with a Pirelli OEM thrown in for good measure). But I think the times they are a changing as Mr. Dylan observed.
 

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General consensus of the usual suspects at various local bike-nights (and probably a majority of riders who contribute to this forum) are that Shinko (S. Korean) and Kenda (“mostly” Chinese from what I can gather) and IRC (Japanese) are low end, cheapo tires not to be taken seriously by the I-ride-hard crowd. Based on the many recommendations on this forum, I just replaced my OEM front with a Michelin Commander. Country of manufacture – Thailand . Am sure the significant, extra cost of the Michelin is due to the superior engineering, choice of components, and company’s manufacturing standards…Right??? I see more and more riders going with Shinko tires on some very expensive scoots and it makes me wonder if they know something I don’t. I experienced the most consistent tire wear with Dunlop Elite III’s on my Wing but the longest wearing tires I’ve ever had were IRC’s on my Boulevard. There’s an average price swing of $45 between the “comparable” Shinko and Michelin fronts. IF you do the math AND you get 20% LESS tread life with the Shinko, you’re still $$ ahead with the Shinko by the 3rd tire change. With the exception of the IRC’s, I’ve always used one of the Big 3 on my bikes – Dunlop, Bridgestone or Michelin (maybe with a Pirelli OEM thrown in for good measure). But I think the times they are a changing as Mr. Dylan observed.
Unless you mount and balance the tire yourself, don't forget to add the cost of that, too. I take the cost of the plus mounting and balancing, divided by the estimated miles the tire will last, to get the coat per mile.
 

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I had a kenda on my Nomad and they are made of hard rubber seemed like it would last forever but i got a screw in tire so replaced with shinko.kenda tire was very noisey. Also the kenda was taller then stock. The shinko I got about 7000 miles out of it with stock size and much quieter ride.
 

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I had a kenda on my Nomad and they are made of hard rubber seemed like it would last forever but i got a screw in tire so replaced with shinko.kenda tire was very noisey. Also the kenda was taller then stock. The shinko I got about 7000 miles out of it with stock size and much quieter ride.
Unless you got that tire for about $50 and don't mind changing tires that often, the Michelin Commander II is a much better deal. It will last at least three times the miles of the Shinko. I paid $180 + $20 for mounting and balancing the tire, doing the install myself, and it lasted 22000 miles. It would take three Shinko tires to get close to that. Three mount/balance charges for $60 will leave you $140 to pay for three Shinko tires. Good luck with that.
 

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Unless you got that tire for about $50 and don't mind changing tires that often, the Michelin Commander II is a much better deal. It will last at least three times the miles of the Shinko. I paid $180 + $20 for mounting and balancing the tire, doing the install myself, and it lasted 22000 miles. It would take three Shinko tires to get close to that. Three mount/balance charges for $60 will leave you $140 to pay for three Shinko tires. Good luck with that.
Michelin Commander 11 Rear Tire 180/65/16 is the way to go for the Voyager 1700. I have tried 5 different tire brands on the rear of my bike and the commander 11 got by far the beast millage 8,000 km more than the runner up. It still had safely another 5,000 km left but I was heading to the west coast (B.C.) pulling a trailer, so I installed a new Commander 11
 

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I am running a Shinko Tourmaster on the front and I have no issues with it. Just went over 12,400 miles with it last week. Looks like at least another 5k left on it. Yep... looks like it is a cheapo no mileage tire that is good for nothing.....

I tried the C II's on another large scoot and did not care for them or the price. Used the Avon's for a while. (on front) then been using Shinko for quite a while. I have Shinko on my other Yamaha scoots. Good mileage on them also.

When it comes to tires, oil, antifreeze, Dark Side.... or any other subject, no matter what does well for you, others cannot tolerate.... so take everything with a grain of salt.

Other than a car tire, the best tire I have seen for the rear on a Voyager is the Metzler 888.... trying out one now. Over 5k miles and does not look worn any. Still has the nibs on it. Good but pricey too....
 

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I am running a Shinko Tourmaster on the front and I have no issues with it. Just went over 12,400 miles with it last week. Looks like at least another 5k left on it. Yep... looks like it is a cheapo no mileage tire that is good for nothing.....

I tried the C II's on another large scoot and did not care for them or the price. Used the Avon's for a while. (on front) then been using Shinko for quite a while. I have Shinko on my other Yamaha scoots. Good mileage on them also.

When it comes to tires, oil, antifreeze, Dark Side.... or any other subject, no matter what does well for you, others cannot tolerate.... so take everything with a grain of salt.

Other than a car tire, the best tire I have seen for the rear on a Voyager is the Metzler 888.... trying out one now. Over 5k miles and does not look worn any. Still has the nibs on it. Good but pricey too....[/QUOTE

There you go again Bubba, comparing front apples with rear oranges, LOL!! The other guy said his REAR Shinko lasted 7k miles. I said the rear Commander II lasted 22k miles for me. Why didn't you put a Shinko on the rear? Things that make you go "hmmmmmm".
 

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Because I had a CT on it after the stock tire was bald at 4000 miles..... Then the 888 came out and I wanted to try it. I will go back to a CT when the 888 goes away... that.s why.... no more... no less... I am still trying it....

No apples... no oranges.... normally no wiase ass comments.... like some....

Most know I am a Car Tire Dark Side rider..... but I do try other things from time to time. Then go back to CT. When this 888 wears out I will put the CT back on that was on it when I put the 88 on....

I do know people with the Shinko rears and they use nothing else. But on Yamaha's. I was in Yamaha forums 20 years, only been in Kawai three.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
(I have to do this, guys. Apologizes to the reasonable people who participate in this forum.)

TS 823:

Wow! 22,000 miles on a motorcycle tire – really? I cannot imagine any other mortal in this universe safely achieving 22K miles one a single cycle tire. Must be from that specially designed, wind-tunnel tested aircraft aluminum rear deck spoiler you installed on your top case – reduces the load on your rear tire by 50% when you reach speeds of 30 mph or above. Or – maybe Michelin let that never-to-be-sold super-secret motorcycle tire (manufactured with that special tire compound derived from the Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator) slip out-the-door to your dealer! Lucky you!

You can now safely join the ranks of those lucky 1972 Pontiac Catalina owners with 400 cubic inch V8’s that were getting 80 miles per gallon because they had that “special” GM carburetor that was never supposed to be used in public. You know – the one that the 4 guys in black suites came to your house to remove from your car in the middle of the night.

The really unfortunate thing about making that kind of claim in a post is that some novice or really gullible newbie will read it and be disappointed or down right angry because they “only” got 15k on their tire.

I think you should mosey over to the page where they guy proclaims himself an oil filter expert because he hacksaws used oil filters and “inspects” the “level of degeneration of the filter material” to determine the overall effectiveness of the filter. He probably gets well over 30k on one set of his bike tires.

(Sigh.)
 

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(I have to do this, guys. Apologizes to the reasonable people who participate in this forum.)

TS 823:

Wow! 22,000 miles on a motorcycle tire – really? I cannot imagine any other mortal in this universe safely achieving 22K miles one a single cycle tire. Must be from that specially designed, wind-tunnel tested aircraft aluminum rear deck spoiler you installed on your top case – reduces the load on your rear tire by 50% when you reach speeds of 30 mph or above. Or – maybe Michelin let that never-to-be-sold super-secret motorcycle tire (manufactured with that special tire compound derived from the Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator) slip out-the-door to your dealer! Lucky you!

You can now safely join the ranks of those lucky 1972 Pontiac Catalina owners with 400 cubic inch V8’s that were getting 80 miles per gallon because they had that “special” GM carburetor that was never supposed to be used in public. You know – the one that the 4 guys in black suites came to your house to remove from your car in the middle of the night.

The really unfortunate thing about making that kind of claim in a post is that some novice or really gullible newbie will read it and be disappointed or down right angry because they “only” got 15k on their tire.

I think you should mosey over to the page where they guy proclaims himself an oil filter expert because he hacksaws used oil filters and “inspects” the “level of degeneration of the filter material” to determine the overall effectiveness of the filter. He probably gets well over 30k on one set of his bike tires.

(Sigh.)
Ricky, that sure took a lot a effort and words just to say you think I lied about getting 22000 miles on a tire. Read some previous posts on this forum. Others report getting as much as 28000 miles. I will make no effort to convince you that I do not lie, because I don't care if you believe me or not. Buy and use whatever tire you choose to believe will serve you best. I don't sell tires or own stock in any tire companies.
 

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I did a lot of research a couple of months ago by searching this forum, another Kawi forum and talking to my dealer. I chose the MCII's given the quality of the Michelin's on my car, what others on the 2 forums had to say about quality and durability, and seeing that this is what my dealer had on his VV and loves them after 15,000 miles and looking really good. Yes, they do cost a bit more - so do the Michelin car tires on my Honda Pilot. But these MCII's run smooth, have great traction, and are rated at 25,000 miles. If i get anywhere near that I will be very very happy.

RickyTT - You can run whatever tire you want on your scoot - it doesn't bother me. I will never say anything bad about your choice of brand or why you chose to go that route. I researched my tires so I wasn't buying blindly. Enough said
 

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This picture is my Michelin Commander II at 19k. I now have just over 20k on it and it is starting to show some wear. I plan on making it last the season and replacing it with another Commander II this winter. The Michelin is also about $20 less than any Metzler tire.

This is mounted on my 12' Voyager.

 

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This picture is my Michelin Commander II at 19k. I now have just over 20k on it and it is starting to show some wear. I plan on making it last the season and replacing it with another Commander II this winter. The Michelin is also about $20 less than any Metzler tire.

This is mounted on my 12' Voyager.

Be careful!! RickyTT will think you are conspiring with me to perpetuate this lie that the Commander II is a high mileage tire. Everyone knows that a motorcycle tire can't last over 10k miles. Ha!!! What a maroon he is!
 

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I run shinko raven 009s on two of my bikes. They are a good sport touring radial tire. On my heavy touring bikes I like to run Michelin tires. Pilot Road 4s on the concours and Commander II on the rear of the Voyager. Still running the Excedra Max on the front of the Voyager.

I think shinko makes good tires. I think they are older technology though. I think Michelin makes better rain tires and I ride in the rain.
 

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Rear Tire Choices

Greetings all. It's time to replace the rear tire on the VV. I generally ride two up. So far it sounds like the Michelin C II is the longevity winner. I am interested in what other tire all of you are running, and what the average mileage is your getting out of them. Please post, and give me your feedback.

Thanks much.
 

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Commander II Size?

Unless you got that tire for about $50 and don't mind changing tires that often, the Michelin Commander II is a much better deal. It will last at least three times the miles of the Shinko. I paid $180 + $20 for mounting and balancing the tire, doing the install myself, and it lasted 22000 miles. It would take three Shinko tires to get close to that. Three mount/balance charges for $60 will leave you $140 to pay for three Shinko tires. Good luck with that.
Having difficulty locating a Commander II in OEM size. What size are you running?
Thanks
 

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I've recommend both the Commander and the American Elite.

I've had some recent bad luck with debris in the road.

I changed my American Elite around 13k due to a flat.
It looked good and broke in; with hardly any wear.

I changed my Commander II around 8k miles due to a flat.
It looked like it had more wear than the Elite but still more than half of it's life left.

Both rode well with the Elite feeling a little more 'agile'.

Having installed both myself, the Elite has a LOT stronger sidewall.

If you have trouble finding the Commander; the Dunlop American Elite is my choice from now on.

Scott
 

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And the larger 180/65/16 rear will bring your speedometer to within 3 miles per hour.

I have bought two of the Commander II's.
My first came from
http://www.compacc.com/p/michelin-commander-2-tires-rear?scpid=2&scid=scsho2755512

Then I bought another one for my wife's 1700 Nomad.
http://www.jakewilson.com/p/1173/-/826612/180-65B-16-(81H)-Michelin-Commander-II-Rear-Motorcycle-Tire?term=1360950007

CompAcc tire showed up next day. Jake Wilson tire showed up in two days. Both companies are excellent to work with.
 

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another option

Im on my second avon cobra on the rear of my 2012 nomad got 32000 km on the first, majority of it riding two up . dont know where they fit in price wise in comparison but they are available in stock sizes .also running cobra on the front but it was put on a few thousand km later
 
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