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Discussion Starter #1
Does anybody have any idea what the maximum recommended riding speed is?

What about the maximum speed that can be maintained 80-90% of riding time without doing any long term damage or without decreasing the expected engine lifetime?

I ride intowork every weekend on the texas Freeway (approximatley 7 miles each way), and usually average towards the upper end of the 70-80 range. I took it up to 90 this morning for a minute or two, and wanted to get an idea if this speed is an

a) definatley safe doing and even going over on a regular basis
b) alright now and again
c) questionable so should be avoided
d) definatley a do not

What are the speed ranges that might fit into each of these 4 groups?
I know its not a crotch rocket, which, from what I understand can go 150 mph+, but on the flip side, these have shorter expected engine lifetimes, since because they are capable of going faster, they wear easier.

Any thoughts?
 

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i went 115 on mine...but that was enough...it can do 80-90mph easy with two people if not more...but that is just stupid when u have a passenger
 

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If you're only going 7 miles, does the engine even warm up enough? And how much time are you going to save by winding it out?
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I was just trying to get a some idea of the limits of the 08 VN 900. At some point (Ideally next summer) I'd like to drift around the southwest (Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California) for a couple of weeks.

I have a full facial helmet, so the wind is not a deterrant for me in going fast. I don't have any add ons, and will be at most carrying a backpack with a massmarket pocket book, and service manual/owners manual. In other words, besides my own weight (no passangers at this time), and extra weight would not be marginal, thus not an issue.

The previous paragraph was a preamble to the following question.

Since, there are whole stretches of Texas Backroud, with little or no impedements on speed, I was wondering what might be the ideal cruising speed on these two lane roads (assuming of course there are no curves and no traffic in either direction, and not near any residential areas)?
 

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95 is just about the fastest I've had Eljay (and only for a moment at that), but have never pondered the question too much. If I wanted speed, I've got the wrong bike...seriously!!!
Now, you bring up the notion of a full face helmet and not much else. Again, the wrong bike. It is common site here to see someone on a crotch rocket with boat tennis shoes, shorts, a tee shirt, no gloves and a full face helemt out screeming from light to light. The funny thing is they're the first person to insist that the full face is much safer and offers more protection. If you're going to test the bike for top speed, please wear full gear and do it in a safe environment. The differance at top end will not be much between the two styles of apparel and if you lose it and go down (heaven forbid) you'll at least have a fighting chance.
All in all my response "to how" fast is usually, fast enough to easily get a speeding ticket on any road or highway in the country (especially Dumas TX). I bought a cruiser to live long, live free and ride well...:cool:
 

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i am the proud owner of a 2003 1600A classic, when trying the bike out,{bought used with only 13000mi} i took it up to 140 on the speedo for about 1/2 mi. that was the only time i have taken it above 80. the bike was stable with no wind buffeting or lift. this was done on a straight level strech of very smooth pavement, with no traffic. i was wearing full gear, and would never do something like this during everyday riding.
 

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Ideal cruising speed for my Custom is under 80mph - over 80 and mpg dropped from 51 to 47. I haven't ridden the Classic or LT, but the Custom isn't the best handling bike once you get over triple digits - especially without a windshield since the seating position isn't aerodynamic. Your communting trip will kill the engine far sooner than running at high speeds. Your short commute will turn the back side of the intake valves into a pile of rock hard carbon and the rest of the internals aren't up to operating temps as you ride along a 4500rpm clip to work. Contaminants/condensation are also not getting burned out of the crankcase in the short commute. My commute for the last 27 years is only 3 miles and it's tough on engines - which is why I have a chain hoist hanging from the garage ceiling.
 

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i am glad that i commute about 30 min a day with the bike, it lets me get the engine up in temps plus its highway mixed wtih city :) I am just really really really happy how smooth this engine is and the ability to be comfy two-up at 70-75mph :) and get close to 50mpgs
 
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Discussion Starter #9
95 is just about the fastest I've had Eljay (and
Now, you bring up the notion of a full face helmet and not much else. Again, the wrong bike.
Actually its my first bike and when I bought it I was not yet intilligent enough to realize that there were different types of helmets for different types of bikes. I went only based upon what they said was the safest, in the safety course.


(especially Dumas TX). :
Although not a native, I feel obliged to say "Don't Mess with Texas".
I can't tell whether the Dumas was a typo of Dallas or whas in fact meant mean "[email protected]$$" Texas, So I will ommit any opinions I have regarding Tree Hugging hippies from California, plus I see how my previous statement regarding the helmet validates the "[email protected]$$" part of your argument.


Can we at least remain civil though?
 

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The 900 will run happily all day on highways posted at 75-80. This would be around 85-95 on your speedometer. I would expect that you could run all day at 90 (100+ on the speedo), but be prepared to dump quite a bit more gas into it.

Seriously, if you're only 7 miles from work, get a bicycle. You're not doing your Vulcan any good.
 

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Actually its my first bike and when I bought it I was not yet intilligent enough to realize that there were different types of helmets for different types of bikes. I went only based upon what they said was the safest, in the safety course.




Although not a native, I feel obliged to say "Don't Mess with Texas".
I can't tell whether the Dumas was a typo of Dallas or whas in fact meant mean "[email protected]$$" Texas, So I will ommit any opinions I have regarding Tree Hugging hippies from California, plus I see how my previous statement regarding the helmet validates the "[email protected]$$" part of your argument.


Can we at least remain civil though?
Is Dumas not a city in Texas?????????
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Seriously, if you're only 7 miles from work, get a bicycle. You're not doing your Vulcan any good.
So are you going with the concensus that this does not give the engine enough time to reach the normal operating temperature.

I was told by a reliable source that as long as the engine has dropped out of the high idle speed, that it would be fine. Even if it is only 7 miles.

P.S.

Even riding a bike 2 miles into work into Texas is known to make people perspire so much, that they are no longer business persentable.
 

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Actually its my first bike and when I bought it I was not yet intilligent enough to realize that there were different types of helmets for different types of bikes. I went only based upon what they said was the safest, in the safety course.




Although not a native, I feel obliged to say "Don't Mess with Texas".
I can't tell whether the Dumas was a typo of Dallas or whas in fact meant mean "[email protected]$$" Texas, So I will ommit any opinions I have regarding Tree Hugging hippies from California, plus I see how my previous statement regarding the helmet validates the "[email protected]$$" part of your argument.


Can we at least remain civil though?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumas,_Texas
 

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So are you going with the concensus that this does not give the engine enough time to reach the normal operating temperature.

I was told by a reliable source that as long as the engine has dropped out of the high idle speed, that it would be fine. Even if it is only 7 miles.

P.S.

Even riding a bike 2 miles into work into Texas is known to make people perspire so much, that they are no longer business persentable.
No, you may be getting to operating temps (heck in Texas you're almost at operating temps before starting it), but i'm in agreement with Baitis in that it's not enough time to really blow any buildup through.

As far as the bike and heat... i'm an old desert rat from Phoenix. I'd ride my bicycle 15 miles (one way) to work three times a week all year long... and this is while i owned two motorcycles and an air-conditioned car. I took my time going in and exercised coming home. Just suggesting pedaling because it's better for you and for the motorcycle considering the short hop.
 

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I guess Im riding between 80-90mph(showin 100 of course) and thats with the 7 degree rake and it still feels safe....Im kinda scared to go higher then that.....before I got the rake I would twist the throttle till I couldnt twist it no more ....most of my friends have bigger bikes so to keep up I would have to get a little heavy on the throttle at times......
 
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No, you may be getting to operating temps (heck in Texas you're almost at operating temps before starting it), but i'm in agreement with Baitis in that it's not enough time to really blow any buildup through.

As far as the bike and heat... i'm an old desert rat from Phoenix. I'd ride my bicycle 15 miles (one way) to work three times a week all year long... and this is while i owned two motorcycles and an air-conditioned car. I took my time going in and exercised coming home. Just suggesting pedaling because it's better for you and for the motorcycle considering the short hop.
So how long would guess is needed to blow any buildup through? I


s this something I can do retroactively? By this I mean, that If I've had the bike for about a year, and only have about 1200 miles on it, will doing this in the future blow out any of that carbon junk that has already build up?

What if anything could I do if I wanted to clean it out any of that carbon crust that might buildup?

I've only started going via the expressway since the beginning of June, due to the Maximum recommended speed of 60 mph for the first 500 miles, and 80 mph after that until the first 1000 miles. That commuting ride I took is probably a little more than th 6 miles, but was not on the expressway, so it would have more frequent stops due to traffic lights, but also with patches of roads were the speed limit was higher than normal but less than expressway speed? (around 55). And don't get me wrong I don't ride it only into work, I do take joy rides. But how long is considered acceptable to be confident that carbon junk is not building up?
 

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Motor warm-up

I'd like to throw my 2 cents in.

One of the main reasons that you need to allow your engine to warm up is more related to drive off any condensation that may have formed in your engine. This is mostly related to spring, fall and winter when the dew point causes water droplets to form in your engine.
You have to get the engine hot enough to evaporate and drive off this moisture as steam. I'm sure you all have seen exhaust pipes dripping water at one time or another. Water left in your engine can form acids that will cause corrosion and sludge buildup.

As far as carbon buildup, this really should not be much of a problems on new engines that are properly tuned and that are in good mechanical condition . With todays cleaner fuels (mandated by EPA) there is much less concerns about inpurities in gasoline forming carbon deposits (leaded was one of the worst). Most better quality gasolines (mostly mid and high grades) contain additives designed to help clean your engine. If your engine is not running rich (most new vehicles are tuned on the lean side to meet EPA) and your rings and valves seals aren't leaking oil through (unlikely on a newer engine) I have to agree that 7 miles shouldn't be an issue. One or two miles might be a bit short but I would think if someone is concerned about this the can always run some of the available gasoline additives from you local autoparts store once and a while. Also I assume most bikers take their bikes out once and a while (other than work)and ride them enough to "blow out the carbon".

As far as the first post I don't think there is any mechanical problems running at full throttle for any lengh of time, Kawaski has a built in rev limiter to prevent engine damage from over reving.
My question would be what is a safe speed to ride at, and I'm sure it not 100+ mph. There are to many variables to even suggest a max speed. Rider experience, weather and road conditions all dictate what speed you drive at (and if you can afford a ticket).
 

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Well lets see... I have an 08 900 and in a little over 13 months I have racked up over 24000 miles. (yeah its a being! hahaha) I routinely travel the interstates and usually run about 75-85 consistently depending on the traffic. Tink never so much as hesitated and she just goes and goes. I have had her to the 130 that is on the speed odometer and she handled like she was going 50. :) so they are a very stable bike and willing run 80 all day with no troubles!

just always ride to your skills and use your head for more then a helmet holder! hahaha and be warned that tickets are not cheep! ride safe!
 
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