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Here's the deal. I'm 46, mature, physically fit, and ready to buy my first bike. It looks like the Kawasaki line features the items I am looking for; technologically advanced, good styling, dependable reputation, etc. I am trying to decide upon displacement. The 900 gets great reviews, but I fear I will tire of the lower power too quickly. The 1600 appears to be going away, and the 1700s don't seem to be available yet. I am wondering if I should just take the leap and go with the 2000.

What do you guys think? Would this be a mistake? I just don't want to pi$$ money away on a 900 that I will want to replace in a matter of months.
 

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Before you do anything , take a riding course . The cruisers you mention are large , heavy bikes and will take getting used to for a beginner , so be careful early on . If you intend on riding alot including touring with a passenger , then you will most likely tire of the relatively low power and torque of the 900 . If you'll be just taking a cruise once in a while when the weather is nice , then a 900 is all you'll ever need . If you want handling with your cruiser , look for a discounted , non-current Mean Streak . The VN2000 (which I'm looking to buy) is never a bad idea from an enthusiast's point of view , but unless you are VERY CONFIDENT and a quick learner , it is IMO just too big and powerful for a first timer ; I've been riding for 34 years and still plan on taking it easy on The Beast for a while .
 

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I just don't want to pi$$ money away on a 900 that I will want to replace in a matter of months.
In a way that's kinda what I did, lol. Don't get me wrong, the 900 is a great bike, it's still in my garage(my oldest son bought it from me:D)but within 3 months I had sold it to him and got myself a Mean Streak:D

Just because the 1600's appear like they're going to be replaced with the 1700's doesn't mean alot to me. OEM and aftermarket parts will be available for a long time. My youngest sons bike is 27 years old, still runs great, and is still easy to find parts for.

For me the MS was the best choice, IMHO, it has the best balance of styling, power, and handling, not to mention it only outweighs the VN900 by a mere 20lbs. Although with that being said, the ergo's of the MS aren't for everyone and if you do alot of 2-up riding with a passenger that's over 5'5", most likely they'll feel cramped.

I don't have any personal experience with the other 1600's, 1700's, or the V2K's, although to be quite honest, if my dealer had a V2K in stock when I was in the market, I'd probably bought it, I love horsepower!:D

There are some huge differences in these bikes in just weight alone, here's a comparison using info from kawi's website-
VN900 Classic- 619.7lbs
Mean Streak 1600- 640lbs
1600 Classic- 675lbs
1700 Classic- 760lbs
V2K- 837.9lbs

I'm not trying to talk you out of a V2K, they're awesome machines, but it's also a whole lot-o-bike. Like HRC said, take the MSF course if at all possible before pulling the trigger on a bike. If at all possible go to dealers and sit on as many bikes as possible, if it's a decent dealer they'll hold the bike upright for you so you can sit on it with both feet on the pegs so you can get a feel for the bike.

IMHO, there's not a bad bike in kawi's cruiser line-up, so find one that fit's you and you're desired riding style and go for it!
 

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Hey there, i've got a 2007 Vulcan 2000 LT in Pearl White and Metallic Silver with only 946 miles for sale. The bike is currently in Las Vegas. Let me know if you'd be interested.
 

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Here is more to consider... You stated this is your first bike. I went back to riding at 49 after 25 years and went with a 900. I ride alone and occasionally (weekends, sometimes to work) so for me it is doing great. The only time I feel the "maybe something bigger" is on the hwy at 75mph when I feel a little "light".

Consider that you WILL drop the bike, sooner or later. Is part of learning. Would you start your kid to learn to drive a hummer, or maybe a small sedan? I have had a 305 maaany years ago, was shopping for a 750 (thinking THAT was big, consider, from a 305), and went with the 900 to not have the "want something bigger" thing too soon.

Yeah, I do lust for a V2K, but still consider it might just be a bit much. Maybe after a few more miles...

A 1 or 2 year old 900 could make a great first time bike, and you can save a few bucks.
 

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I can relate

I can relate, I bought my first bike, vulcan 900, at age 47 last summer. I'm a large guy, 350+, and was worried about the power of the 900. I looked at the 1600 and 2000 for the increased power but am very happy I got the 900.

The 900 is easy to ride so it makes for a great first bike but even after you cget used to riding it does not lack for sufficent power and cool looks. Sure, I look and kind of wish I had a 2000 but I may not be ready to handle that yet. I think the 900 is a perfect bike for you. It cheap enough that when you (and I) are really comfortable with it in several years, the 1700 adn 2000 will still be there.
 

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If your a new rider go for the 900 the 2000 is a lot of bike for a beginner I only went with the 2000 because of the big highway miles I put on every year. I use my 1100 shadow for around town.
 

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My first bike was an Ariel square four, which was four cylinders and 1000 cc's. My seventh bike is twice as big with half the cylinders. My philosophy is get the biggest bike you can afford and enjoy the outcome.
 

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Here's the deal. I'm 46, mature, physically fit, and ready to buy my first bike. It looks like the Kawasaki line features the items I am looking for; technologically advanced, good styling, dependable reputation, etc. I am trying to decide upon displacement. The 900 gets great reviews, but I fear I will tire of the lower power too quickly. The 1600 appears to be going away, and the 1700s don't seem to be available yet. I am wondering if I should just take the leap and go with the 2000.

What do you guys think? Would this be a mistake? I just don't want to pi$$ money away on a 900 that I will want to replace in a matter of months.
Guitarhack,

I was in the same position about seven months ago 46, mture and physically fit 5'9" 185-190 lbs. I had gone into stores and sat on bikes to get a feel. When asking the salesmen they tended to tell me what they thought I wanted to hear.

My brother has an 800 and strongly suggested that I go with the larger bike. He said it wouldn't be long before I would have become comfortable and wanted to move up. Because I am new to biking and this is my first bike I was a little apprenhensive, but decided to take his suggestion.

On another note, I was defininetly intimidated by the 2000 just the look of it. I am very glad that I chose the 1600. So I strongly recommend that you go with the 1600 (you may be able to find a new leftover on ebay) or the 1700. As for the 2000 go into the dealership and sit on it feel the weight and balance beneath you to see if you are comfortable with it. If you are.... go for it. In addition. compare the dry weight of the three bikes to see if the 2000 is siginifically heavier.

I'll also share this interesting and somewhat amusing point. When I went to pick my bike up, handling it and loading it I quickly developed some serious anxiety. The bike felt far heavier handling it than it did just sitting on it. I thought I was in over my head. After I started riding it, I became much more comfortable and know that I made the right choice. The more I ride the better I feel about the bike. Am now starting to add accessories.

Long story short... don't go below a 1,500.

I would not be concerned about the additonal power because of one key word you mentioned... "mature". I also highly recommend that if you haven't taken the MSF course to do so. It is invaluable.

Hope this helps.

Norman
 

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Here's the deal. I'm 46, mature, physically fit, and ready to buy my first bike. It looks like the Kawasaki line features the items I am looking for; technologically advanced, good styling, dependable reputation, etc. I am trying to decide upon displacement. The 900 gets great reviews, but I fear I will tire of the lower power too quickly. The 1600 appears to be going away, and the 1700s don't seem to be available yet. I am wondering if I should just take the leap and go with the 2000.

What do you guys think? Would this be a mistake? I just don't want to pi$$ money away on a 900 that I will want to replace in a matter of months.
So what did you get?
 

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I'm new to motorcycles myself. I'm 40yrs old 6'2" 230 bike has plenty of power but not so much to get into trouble and with the weight issue I'm glad because I forgot to put the kickstand down a couple of times (in front of some people) and was able to pull it back up before any damage was done and any embarrassment. then with the price it can't be beat. I will move up to a bigger scoot later on when I feel I'm ready but for now I'm OK.
 

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Buying a bike

I was 46, maybe not so physically fit, and hadn't owned a bike for nearly 25 years when I bought my VN2000. When the dealership was done putting on all the bling I wanted (bike was pretty plain), I took it home and promptly scared the crap out of myself with the bottom end power in this bike. That coupled with the weight produced a couple of "moments"....But now, I wouldn't have anything but the V2K for a power cruising tourer. At 6ft and 300 lbs (in leather), with a not so slender better half and luggage, I like the big power. I also bought a 900 Custom last year for a BTB bike and I like it for around town and short trips. Vibrates like hell at 75+ mph, but in town and on the backroads, it is a blast. My little brother and his wife took it to Sturgis last year and they kept up just fine. I wouldn't recommend it if your payload exceeds 400lbs. Even at the top preload the suspension is spongy.

I looked at the new 1700s and I like them. Big power, electronic cruise control, and lots of accessories available. It might be worth your time to wait for one or find a dealer that has one coming right away.
 

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Here's the deal. I'm 46, mature, physically fit, and ready to buy my first bike. It looks like the Kawasaki line features the items I am looking for; technologically advanced, good styling, dependable reputation, etc. I am trying to decide upon displacement. The 900 gets great reviews, but I fear I will tire of the lower power too quickly. The 1600 appears to be going away, and the 1700s don't seem to be available yet. I am wondering if I should just take the leap and go with the 2000.

What do you guys think? Would this be a mistake? I just don't want to pi$$ money away on a 900 that I will want to replace in a matter of months.
Guitarhack... I ride a 1995 Vulcan 800a and weigh in at about 235lbs.... it is modified a bit as far as gear ratios to make it more a road worthy bike. I also ride a 2007 Harley Ultra Glide that is 96ci and weighs near a half ton loaded... my wife rides her own, so I ride one up most all the time. My old 800a may not win many races, but has more than enough power to cruise hundreds of miles in the moutains all day long fully loaded... and in many ways is much more fun to ride than the big Harley beast.

Alot depends on a riders style of riding... some like the feel of being able to out run most anybody but a sports bike... in that case the Mean Streak mentioned below is an awesome bike (rode a freinds, it is quite an awesome bike). But if you will be one that will cruise near the speed limit, and enjoy the view... then the 900 will be a very fun bike... though if you will be riding two up I would go with at least a 1500. As to any bike that may feel light of needing another gear on the interstate, there are many option to change the bike to meet the need... though that is a tad harder with a shaft drive bike (the 900 is belt drive and there are pulley kits for them).... the wind is what it is, and even on a Honda Helix scooter on the interstate, it never blew me out of my lane... I just relax and go with the flow.!!

To me the MSF course should be required for everyone that rides... even the most experienced riders will tell you that they learned a lot of things in the class... and for a first time rider, it allows you to learn on a small bike that the class owns if you were to drop it. Remember there are two kinds of riders... those that have been down... and those that will be going down... it happens to most everyone at some point... no matter how long you have been riding.

Good luck on your choice.!! :D
 

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I would by the 2000. Most people don't get hurt because the bike is big, it's because someone runs over/into them.
I have seen first time buyers get a Hayabusa and be OK.
If you made to your 40's your judgement is probably OK?
I was on a tank shift Harley dresser at 15 and only dropped in the parking lot because I forgot the stand was up.
I rode V8 bikes about ten yours ago with 350 HP and could not wait to ride a 454 big block Boss Hoss.
I would not get the 900 if you think you will ever want more,
but that is just me:D
 

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I think you have to ask your self what kind of rideing will I be doing & how big of a bike do I really need. Cost may be a factor maybe not. If you are going to be just rideing around town or on short local trips the 900 will be fine. If you are seaking a little more adventure then the power of a larger bike is a lot more fun. I have a vulcan classic 900 and a vulcan nomad 1500 both great bikes. I ride the 1500 and my wife rides the 900 but I have to tell you that I will ride her bike sometimes around town just for the fun of it. The 900 is a lighter bike and after riding my bike it seems so easy to handle. If your afraid of not having enough power with the 900 and a 2000 seems a bit to scarey I'de look for a used 1500 or a 1600 I think you'll be happy with one of these bikes. I will tell you this if my wife pulls up next to you at a stop light and your on a 900 she will tell you that your riding a girls bike as she speeds off leaving you wondering what just happened.:)
 

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When you look at the drag times for stock bikes, there is not alot of difference in the 1/8th mile... even the 500 does extremely well... 1/4 bikes like the 900 begin to add a tad more speed (less time) and the 1500 or 1600 don't really add much over them... but add a load and go ride the mountains and the difference really shows... now if you are looking for gas milage the 900 looks to be alot better... my 1600 averages mid 40's if you stay off the throttle a bit.
 

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Although I have been riding since I was 16 , I found myself in the same position , after a sebatical of many years, I took a refresher and then bought my first 2000. I NEVER regretted it..
I didn't want to be in the position of having to sell and wait to find the one I want etc..... I wanted to buy the bike I was going to have forever and do all the things to it that I want to do...once! not have bits and pieces of all the ikes I had laying around..
ANYWAY, you are going to drive causiously the first year anyway.and the undercarrige of the VN2000 is quite square , so even if you lean it over, it rests on the floorboards. Yes it is a heavy bike, but the weight is low and centred and it gives such a smooth highway ride adn the big back tire doesn't grab in every little crack and pull you around.
All in all, it's a great bike. and it is a great reward to take a seven foot bike and manouver it through an iron cross....STRONGLY suggest that you do a LOT of parking lot slow manouvers and get very friendly with, not just the wieght of the bike but the balance. the bike is weighted to the left a bit so it drops to your down foot when rested, but it surprises you when you pull n the break at low speen and it dips in.... all things you will figure out on your own...
Have fun and ride safe....
 

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Same situation for me, When I first started looking for a bike to buy the only thing I was certain of is that I was not buying new nor was I going to spend the $$$ on an HD. I went to a dealer that had all but HD's. I bet I threw my leg over 50 bikes that day (and yes the salesman held some of the bikes up for me). When I left that day I knew I wanted the Kawasaki but was still unsure of the size but I did know I wanted at least a 1500 or higher but was skeptical about the V2K. Well, after searching craigslist for the bike I liked I took a look at an 04 V2K with all the extras I wanted. After the road test, I was sold.

I have been around bikes before but never a big cruiser before and did not want to upgrade in a year or so.

To me it's all about not exceeeding your limits. I bought the V2k and really love it. I have ridden about 500 miles so far and it is alot of bike. People get into trouble when they overdue it or take unsessary risks. (the reason you should take the MSF course) In the end you have to be satisfied because you do not want any regrets. I reccomend you buy what feels natural when you sit on the seat. The power applied is matter of wrist control and the weight can be a positive or negative, depending if your going past a big rig or trying to pick it up.

I have no regrets with my V2K.

Good luck and safe riding.
 
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