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Hey guys. I am checking out a 1999 VN 750 at a dealership. 14K, for $2500. Is there anything that I need to look for before I get it? Like certain mechanical problems? I am a TOYOTA Master tech, so I am able to spot trouble spots easily. AND, ANY advice on buying/not buying the bike would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!! Larry
 

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run away

Hey guys. I am checking out a 1999 VN 750 at a dealership. 14K, for $2500. Is there anything that I need to look for before I get it? Like certain mechanical problems? I am a TOYOTA Master tech, so I am able to spot trouble spots easily. AND, ANY advice on buying/not buying the bike would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!! Larry
Run away. Being a mechanic will frustrate the living snot out of you when you try to do anything. Removing the carbs is a four hour, two man job and replacing them is 6 - the staked connection between the valve slide and the diaphragm can fracture and fail without warning. Getting to the float needle is difficult, getting to clean the valve is next to impossible. The ACCT is a POS, the spring is so weak that is useless - and it stress fractures and fails at the bent tang. The alternate MCCT is questionably designed. This bike is NOT mechanic friendly.
 

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Hey guys. I am checking out a 1999 VN 750 at a dealership. 14K, for $2500. Is there anything that I need to look for before I get it? Like certain mechanical problems? I am a TOYOTA Master tech, so I am able to spot trouble spots easily. AND, ANY advice on buying/not buying the bike would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!! Larry
The price sounds a bit high, but it is the beginning of riding season, and I don`t know what prices are like where ever you live.

Take a 10 mm socket and extension to take the seat off. Bolts holding seatback are inside toolbox.
Check the battery box and frame under it for any corrosion or acid spills from an old style wet cell battery.

Bonus points if there is a recently installed MF-AGM battery.

Check charging system from idle to 5K RPM.
Voltage should climb to about 14.5-15 V

A stator failure used to require an engine pull or tilt to replace it, until TuxedoSeven detailed a $20 engine case mod which greatly simplifies this repair.
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13292

Some vn750 left the factory w/o ever having the rear splines lubed.
Try to find out if the dealer has serviced the bike, and if the rear spline to final drive coupling was inspected and lubed prior to putting it up for sale.

Even if it was lubed, they probably used the cheapest wheel bearing grease to be found, instead of high moly like Honda Moly60 lube. If you buy any shaft drive bike check the rear splines and use the Moly60 to lube them.

This is how it should be done:
http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=17274

*Note what worn out unlubed splines look like.

The engine and carbs CAN be a pain to get out, and the jets are difficult to get at while the carb is installed on the bike, but many members on the vn750.com board have done it. Ask some questions over there too.

Engine balancer dampers can start to deteriorate at 10-15 years old too.
First sign is rubber chunks in brass screen behind the drain plug on the left side.

IMHO Jodam is way too negative about this great midsized cruiser.

Hope to welcome you to the Vulcan madness soon.:)
 

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The price sounds a bit high, but it is the beginning of riding season, and I don`t know what prices are like where ever you live.

Take a 10 mm socket and extension to take the seat off. Bolts holding seatback are inside toolbox.
Check the battery box and frame under it for any corrosion or acid spills from an old style wet cell battery.

Bonus points if there is a recently installed MF-AGM battery.

Check charging system from idle to 5K RPM.
Voltage should climb to about 14.5-15 V

A stator failure used to require an engine pull or tilt to replace it, until TuxedoSeven detailed a $20 engine case mod which greatly simplifies this repair.
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13292

Some vn750 left the factory w/o ever having the rear splines lubed.
Try to find out if the dealer has serviced the bike, and if the rear spline to final drive coupling was inspected and lubed prior to putting it up for sale.

Even if it was lubed, they probably used the cheapest wheel bearing grease to be found, instead of high moly like Honda Moly60 lube. If you buy any shaft drive bike check the rear splines and use the Moly60 to lube them.

This is how it should be done:
http://www.vn750.com/forum/showthread.php?t=17274

*Note what worn out unlubed splines look like.

The engine and carbs CAN be a pain to get out, and the jets are difficult to get at while the carb is installed on the bike, but many members on the vn750.com board have done it. Ask some questions over there too.

Engine balancer dampers can start to deteriorate at 10-15 years old too.
First sign is rubber chunks in brass screen behind the drain plug on the left side.

IMHO Jodam is way too negative about this great midsized cruiser.

Hope to welcome you to the Vulcan madness soon.:)
Ol Hoss has given you very solid information. The VN750 is an awesome bike.
 

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Apology

Ol Hoss has given you very solid information. The VN750 is an awesome bike.
Ol Hoss did provide very good advice and I agree that I was too harsh. Serial failures focused my thinking too narrowly on the shortcomings. Having to remove and replace the carbs a second time showed how quickly the learning curve could make the job much faster. Out in two hours, back in in less - propping the air box out of the way and installing the rear cylinder intake sleeve then rotating the carb into place with the straps off really helps.

I regret the slam and vow to keep an open mind if I have to remove the engine to get to the stator. It is a fun little cruiser with a couple of design quirks.
 

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I :l[ to thee jodam for coming forward. Anytime you wrench it can be very frustrating, especially if you are in need of your bike. I am fortunate enough to have a truck so if either need repair I am in no hurry to finish the same day.
 
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