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BOTM Winner, April 2013
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Discussion Starter #1
I recently picked up an '03 1600 Classic for a very good price, so I couldn't resist buying it. Anyway, I replaced the clutch friction plates after I realized the clutch was slipping. Now I'm noticing a very slight radiator leak. I repeat, very slight leak. The owner at the bike shop I use says he has replaced 5 or 6 radiators on VN1600's, so this must be a common issue. Has anyone used Stop Leak for car radiators in a bike? Is there any reason NOT to try it? I'm thinking the leak is so slight that it would be easily plugged by the Stop Leak and save me from buying a radiator. Thoughts?
 

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Id be careful, but if you do use it dont use the whole bottle obviously. Make sure it gets put in the closed part of the cooling system, not the overflow. It will be a temp fix but can buy you time. Have you verified where its leaking from? I have repaired plastic tanks with jb weld type epoxy, it does work and is a longr lasting temp fix, or can be used permantly if watched close.
 

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BOTM Winner, April 2013
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Discussion Starter #3
With the bike sitting straight up on my table lift, I found two drops of coolant on the table, directly below the top of the radiator. Therefore I first checked the top radiator hose clamp, but it was tight and not appearing to leak at all. Funny thing is that the coolant drops appeared without the bike being run at all, so the radiator hadn't been pressurized.
 

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Check your hose connections over carefully. If you determine it is the radiator a local radiator shop should be able to fix it fairly cheap.
 

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I would never put any kind of radiator stop leak in a car, much less a motorcycle. The stuff works (or at least the early versions did) by reacting with oxygen when it is hot to form a plug at a leak. There is always some air dissolved in the coolant, so the stuff tends to slowly build up throughout the system. My dad had a radiator shop back in the days when you repaired a radiator if possible rather than just chunking it. I have radiators completely clogged and unsalvageable because of that stuff.
 

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With the bike sitting straight up on my table lift, I found two drops of coolant on the table, directly below the top of the radiator. Therefore I first checked the top radiator hose clamp, but it was tight and not appearing to leak at all. Funny thing is that the coolant drops appeared without the bike being run at all, so the radiator hadn't been pressurized.
That is exactly when a coolant hose under my tank would leak a little....when the engine cooled off. I would notice a little white/green residue around the hose end. I don't see why the 1600 rads would be any more susceptible to leaks than any other one. I would double check all hoses first just to be sure that isn't the issue.
 

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I would want to know exactly where the leak was coming from before attempting any repairs. How about putting some dye in the system to help find it if you can't any other way. [ame]http://www.amazon.com/Interdynamics-375CS-Radiator-Coolant-Dye/dp/B002M4E0VC[/ame]
 

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BOTM Winner, April 2013
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Discussion Starter #8
I would want to know exactly where the leak was coming from before attempting any repairs. How about putting some dye in the system to help find it if you can't any other way. http://www.amazon.com/Interdynamics-375CS-Radiator-Coolant-Dye/dp/B002M4E0VC
Looking at the radiator from over the fender, you can see the wet radiator fins in the upper right corner. You can see the wet marks slowly seeping down the fins. I'll probably end up removing it and taking it to a local radiator shop, if they tell me they work on motorcycle radiators.
 
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