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Not always true but understand your position SteveJB
I have seen many riders that are just starting out and have ridden for a couple of months as well as a few riders that have actually been riding for a long time that have trouble in turns because they have no idea how to counter steer and actually don't ever counter steer or if they do its to such a small amount that they have no idea.
Counter steering comes naturally for some but not for all. I just finished watching a break down of an accident where the rider clearly didn't know how to counter steer got into trouble in a corner and tried to turn the front wheel harder into the turn.
Of course the bike stood up straight and ran him head on into what he was trying to avoid.
Practicing counter steering and gradually increasing your lean angle and speed through turns is a good way to develop the muscle memory or subconscious counter steering a lot of us that have ridden for a long time already do with out thinking about it.
The more you practice the more likely you will use it when it matters and not panic and try to steer the bike resulting in it going the opposite direction you wanted it to go at a critical time.
And of course ALWAYS look where you want to go not at what you want to avoid. Target fixation is very real and the reason why i have to stay clear of female joggers in yoga pants.
Cant afford another ticket LOL
 

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Really, the only way you'll gain confidence is by doing it. The concept you describe, counter steer, is the same on all two wheeled vehicles. If you're a cyclist and haven't run into a building, you know how to counter steer, you just haven't had to think about it. The gyroscopic effect that creates counter steer is more evident the faster the bike is moving (because the wheels are turning faster). It's also more noticeable on the motorcycle because the gyroscopes (wheels) are more massive than on your bicycle.

If you want a perfectly safe way to experiment a bit, take the front wheel off your bicycle and hold it by the axel in front you. Have a friend spin the wheel as fast as they can get it going. Now try to push the right side of the axle forward. The wheel will bank to the right. Push the left side of the axel forward. The wheel will bank left. This is what you're doing when you steer your bike at speed. At what speed counter steer begins depends somewhat on the bike, but if you haven't run into anything yet, your hands have already figured it out.

Here's a video that might help.
Good luck, stay safe, enjoy the ride!
It's called "gyroscopic procession". Physics dictate that any force applied to the gyroscope in rotation will take effect 90° from the application point. It's more intense on bikes with heavier wheels and tires.
As far as turning confidence, the best advice I ever received was from my Dad who raced AMA flat track #54 until 1971 when I was born. His advice was to try to envision the arc or "line" of your whole turn as soon as possible by ALWAYS LOOKING AHEAD THROUGH THE TURN FAR AS YOU CAN! Where you will be is more important than where you are. And you will instinctively and subconsciously go where your eyes go!
Last week while following a newly HD'd couple down Banner Grade (CA hwy78) in Julian, CA; I watched one rider completely freeze and fail to turn in a switchback because she was looking at the wall of granite she did not want to hit! She hit it, after locking her back tire and laying down a paper plated '22 sportster. She may give up and never ride again because no one ever told her to look down the road and look around the turns ahead! You go where your eyes are looking everytime! Hope this helps you and others as it has kept me alive after riding 20k miles per year in San Diego since 1992!! Let the good times roll.
 

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And if you look where you want to go, you will naturally lean your body properly, too. It's a hard habit to develop, but absolutely necessary. Looking ahead in a turn or curve is not only necessary to negotiate curves safely, but it helps the lean to feel more natural and balanced.

Like the others have said, practice then practice some more.
I’m so glad you brought this up.. this even goes for cornering in a cage. Look where you want to go, not where you are. Excellent advice
 

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Awesome cornering discussion!

I would like to add a couple really important things to the discussion...

As you build confidence, remember to keep your cornering in control. Don't push it past 80%. You want that 20% reserved, in case there is a surprise in your line. That could be debris in the road, something suddenly obstructing your line, a tighter corner than you expected, et cetera.

Don't chop your throttle, brake, or shift in corners. Doing so will affect your suspension, which will affect your center of gravity. That can cause either a low side or high side crash. Positive throttle is necessary to maintain your line, along with your countersteer and lean.
 
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