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Discussion Starter #1
My battery died last week, so I re-charged it with my Battery Tender Jr. It started the next day and seemed fine. Then the bike sat for about 3 days, but it started up Monday morning. However, that afternoon, I had to get a jump start to get home. So I bought a new battery and installed it. The new battery read 13v at full first charge. But after hooking it to the bike and starting the engine, I only got 12.2v - 12.3v. After riding one day, the new battery is dead (11.2v) and won't start the engine. So I am thinking bad stator now. Am I on the right track? Or are there other tests I need to do to identify the culprit of my woes. Please help.

PS- Stators are expensive!!!! :mad:
 

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For around $10 I think you can find PDF of service manuals that give the testing procedures to narrow it right down. Might be worth it. Could be regulator/rectifier.

The alternator output can be checked with an AC voltmeter when it's unplugged from the regulator/rectifier. You should get something like 60 volts AC, give or take a bit, at 3K RPM. If so, the alternator is probably OK and is the regulator/rectifier. This is according to VN2K service manual, but I'd think alternator operation shouldn't be too much different.
 

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My battery died last week, so I re-charged it with my Battery Tender Jr. It started the next day and seemed fine. Then the bike sat for about 3 days, but it started up Monday morning. However, that afternoon, I had to get a jump start to get home. So I bought a new battery and installed it. The new battery read 13v at full first charge. But after hooking it to the bike and starting the engine, I only got 12.2v - 12.3v. After riding one day, the new battery is dead (11.2v) and won't start the engine. So I am thinking bad stator now. Am I on the right track? Or are there other tests I need to do to identify the culprit of my woes. Please help.

PS- Stators are expensive!!!! :mad:
When you were reading 12.2-12.3 VDC was that at idle or was that at a brisk RPM? To test the stator, remove the regulator from it's mount directly under the oil filter and unplug the connector. There are three white wires that you will test. Take your multimeter and set the dial (switch) to AC. Start the bike, bring the revs up to about 4000 RPM and measure between any two white wires. . The reading should be 56VAC or higher. Test the other white wires one against the other (A-B, B-C, A-C). All the readings should be the same at 56 VAC or higher. Turn off the engine and switch your multimeter to "ohms". Now test each white wire against each other once again. The readings should be between 0.11 and 0.17 ohms. You can also take the multimeter on the ohm setting and check each white wire to frame ground. The readings should all be infinity (open circuit).
In the event you need a new stator, others here have had good luck and saved money by going to Rick's Motorsports Electric for their replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I got about 12.23v at idle and 12.34v at about 3000rpm. I am guessing a bit on the rpms per I don't have a tach. Anyway, I do have the service manual, but I just found this out last night so I haven't been able to read what it says yet. I will do more checking like Sojourner says and see where I stand. Thanks for the advise.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Update & Questions:
I was able to get under the bike last night and do more testing. As said above I get 12.2 - 12.3VDC at the battery with a newly charged battery and the bike running. I did the stator test where you check the leads at the rectifier. I got about 25-30VAC on each lead with the bike running in the 3000-4000rpm range. The service manual said it should be 54VAC or higher. I also checked the ohms readings on these leads. I got .07 ohms consistently between each connection and infinity between each wire and ground. The ground reading shows good, but the resistance is supposed to be .11-.14 ohms between each lead. So between the low VAC and the low resistance readings, I am pretty sure the stator is weak.

I plan to order the Rick's Motorcycle Electric stator through Dennis Kirk. The website shows this to come with the factory leads, but I have read that it just comes with wires and crimps that need to be soldered to existing factory connectors. Has anyone bought this from Dennis Kirk? If so, how did it come?

Also, I did the Napa 80/100w headlight upgrade and added the Wallyworld 50w driving lights. I also have a Dobeck fuel computer running. I tend to run the highbeam during the day per it makes me easier to see. I figure this is adding 12-15 amps to my system. Could this have caused the stator to go bad? Or am I just victim to the cheap Kawi stator that has gotten everyone else? I don't remember what the stock stator is rated for, but I thought you could add something like 35amps without worry. I am willing to back down on my amp usage some if needed to protect the new stator, but I just don't know.

Another thing, I have occasionally killed the battery by leaving the lights on or something (5-6 times in 3 years). Then when I try to start I get that rapid solenoid clicking sound. Is this bad on the stator? I know amps increase as voltage decreases. Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

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70 watts is the advised maximum additional load for the entire electrical system. Only reference to amperage I could find was for the accessory connectors, which are on a 10 amp fuse.
 

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If you could find a service manual, which you should if you're going to troubleshoot and fix the bike yourself, the amps would be listed in there.

Don't know the number for the 900, but in my VN2K manual it give the output at 5,000 RPM. Not sure about you guys, but I don't drive often (and may not have ever hit) 5K RPM. With a smaller engine the rated output RPM may or may not be higher....?
 

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I bought the Rick's Stator from Dennis Kirk. It comes with blunt cut wires, no connectors of any kind. I also found that you can't access the wires on the bike without removing the drive pulley. In the first pic you can see the wires coming up from behind a plate directly behind the pulley.

Three more notes:
You need to order the generator cover gasket. You're dealer probably will claim not to have any.

You need an small torque wrench. The bolts torque to 87 in/lbs so a ft/lb torque wrench won't work.

As you're taking the cover off pay attention to the bolts. There are 2 different lengths and the manual doesn't show you which go were. I photographed mine so I could locate the long bolts during reassembly.

Turns out it wasn't nearly a big a job as I was expecting, but then I enjoy turning wrenches.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
1 - I do have the service manual. I'll look to see if the wattage is listed there.
2 - Yes, I did the voltage test where you disconnect the plug from the rectifier and test the voltage across each of the 3 wires coming from the stator.
3 - I have ordered the generator cover gasket as well as the Ricks stator. Actually got them through the local dealer since their price was about the same as Dennis Kirk. This way I have a face to yell at if something isn't right.
4 - I do have a couple different torque wrenches. Isn't 87 in-lbs the same as 7.25 ft-lbs?
5 - Thanks for the heads up on the different bolt lengths. I can imagine the cussing when I got to that point.
 

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Jeep Pirate, yeah 7.25 ft/lbs. My large wrench starts at 10. So when it clicks it's probably the bolt snapping off.
 

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Are you sure that your meter is accurate?
Try plugging into wall socket to see what it reads on AC volts.
Also, You are talking .04 ohms difference in the stator resistance readings. I am not so sure that your meter is that accurate or sensitive at those values.
Post back with the make and model number of your meter.
Why I say this is because your tests are giving inconsistant results which brings the meter into question.
Do not buy a stator just yet.

Post back.
 

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I bought the Rick's Stator from Dennis Kirk. It comes with blunt cut wires, no connectors of any kind. I also found that you can't access the wires on the bike without removing the drive pulley. In the first pic you can see the wires coming up from behind a plate directly behind the pulley.

Three more notes:
You need to order the generator cover gasket. You're dealer probably will claim not to have any.

You need an small torque wrench. The bolts torque to 87 in/lbs so a ft/lb torque wrench won't work.

As you're taking the cover off pay attention to the bolts. There are 2 different lengths and the manual doesn't show you which go were. I photographed mine so I could locate the long bolts during reassembly.

Turns out it wasn't nearly a big a job as I was expecting, but then I enjoy turning wrenches.
87 in lbs= 7.25 ft lbs. just turn your torque wrench to that
 

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Are you sure that your meter is accurate?
Try plugging into wall socket to see what it reads on AC volts.
Also, You are talking .04 ohms difference in the stator resistance readings. I am not so sure that your meter is that accurate or sensitive at those values.
Post back with the make and model number of your meter.
Why I say this is because your tests are giving inconsistant results which brings the meter into question.
Do not buy a stator just yet.

Post back.
As a rule testing the ohm scale of a digital meter should be done with a known resistance such as a resistor with a +- of 5% or less. Then each time the meter is used check first that when the probes are touched together the meter reads zero.
 

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Are you sure that your meter is accurate?
Try plugging into wall socket to see what it reads on AC volts.
Also, You are talking .04 ohms difference in the stator resistance readings. I am not so sure that your meter is that accurate or sensitive at those values.
Post back with the make and model number of your meter.
Why I say this is because your tests are giving inconsistant results which brings the meter into question.
Do not buy a stator just yet.

Post back.
I agree that the low ohms readings are suspect on many multimeters. I use a 1 ohm, 1% resistor to check mine but even then, sub-ohm/fractional ohm readings can be tricky due to contact resistances and all that stuff.

Generally, IMO, the voltage readings are not so much of a concern. Even the el-cheapos I've used have been pretty good in this regard (at least on DC scale) although there is always the possibility of a defective/broken one. It's also possible the meter, depending on its type/features, may not properly register the AC signal of the alternator if it's of higher frequency or non-sinusoidal waveform.
 
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