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This may sound like a dumb question, but on one of the sites with Kawasaki specific parts, there was an add for Kawasaki 900 Repsol Transmission Oil. I was under the impression that the engine oil also lubricated the transmission, and that there was not a transmission oil to have to replace. I have not been able to find anything in the service manual to suggest otherwise. Am I correct in assuming that the engine oil is the only lubricant except for antifreeze coolant that needs to be changed on a regular basis?:confused:
 

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This may sound like a dumb question, but on one of the sites with Kawasaki specific parts, there was an add for Kawasaki 900 Repsol Transmission Oil. I was under the impression that the engine oil also lubricated the transmission, and that there was not a transmission oil to have to replace. I have not been able to find anything in the service manual to suggest otherwise. Am I correct in assuming that the engine oil is the only lubricant except for antifreeze coolant that needs to be changed on a regular basis?:confused:
I believe you are correct.
 

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Maybe for the 2-strokes?

Two-stroke bikes obviously have separate transmissions and lubricants.
 

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Repsol Transmission Oil 10W-30 mineral based # SAE 10W30 mineral based lubricant designed to suit the requirements of gearboxes and clutches that need an independent lubricant. <snip!>

Ours doesn't.
Unless I'm VERY mistaken - the gearbox in the 900 is lubricated by the engine oil....This is why some automotive oils are not appropriate for motorcycle use.

As far as your other question, in addition to the oil/coolant, I'd also take an ocassional peek at the brake fluid levels/condition. After a couple of years, your brake fluid may start to resemble the cup of coffee you (may) enjoy in the morning - even though the levels are within spec. Replace it every few years if this is the case. It's normal for the brake fluid levels to drop some as you wear down your brake pads - but you really shouldn't have to add brake fluid to a healthy system very often at all.

Here's some gee-whiz info from AMSOIL. I don't use their (oil) products myself, but I respect their expertise in the field:

Motorcycle crankcase oils are specially formulated for motorcycle applications that have wet clutches. Most automotive oils are not suitable for use in motorcycle engines. A premium quality motorcycle specific oil typically has higher levels of anti-wear chemistry such as zinc and phosphorus than some automotive oils do, which are critical in protecting high RPM and high load and engines from wear and especially cam lifters and follower wear. That is not to say that all motorcycle oils have increased levels of zinc and phosphorus; many do not.

Over the years, automotive manufacturers have requested oil manufacturers to reduce zinc, phosphorus (an essential element in ZDDP, Zinc Diethyl Dithiophosphate) and other extreme pressure additives from the oil. The primary reason is that automotive manufacturers have requested is that they are extending emissions systems warranties to periods of 10 years/150,000 miles and they claim that high concentrations of these chemical additives were contaminating their catalytic converters and negatively affecting emission levels required to meet their 10 yea/150,000 mile warranty requirements. There are also a few motorcycles on the market that have catalytic converters, however they are not subject to the same 10-year requirements as the automotive industry for emissions levels.
Another issue with using an automotive type oil in a motorcycle with a wet clutch is that many automotive oils have friction modifiers. Friction modifiers in automotive oils tend to provide increased frictional reduction and offset a portion of the fuel economy lost when the U.S. Government mandated a reformulated gasoline for emissions requirements. However these friction modifiers can be detrimental to proper wet clutch operation and can cause slippage and other potential performance issues such as “engine start failures, a rough running feel and increased fuel consumption due to higher engine stall speeds”.
 

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Hi guys,

just to add to it kawa afterthought. You are correct, the 900 doesn't have a separate transmission oil. It's an all in one system like most motorcycles except for BMW, Guzzi, Harley and maybe a few others. So never use automotive oil in your bike or the clutch will most likely start to slip (at best) or stop working all together (worst) (see AMSOIL clip). I have been using AMSOIL in my bike and my two trucks and have nothing but good to say about it. It is the best assurance money can buy as far as oil goes.

Cheers :)

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies. I can rest easy that I haven't missed something. I appreciate it....Walt E.
 
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