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Premium Member
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Picked up a (brand new ) 2013 Classic yesterday. I drove over 1,000 miles round trip in a day and a half to get it and, aside from being pretty tired right now, I'm a happy camper.



I rented a U-Haul 6x9 motorcycle trailer which was a breeze to use. I had the mechanic from the dealership load it for me and then I re-adjusted the tie-down spots for my own comfort. Absolutely no problems along the way.

A couple of notes from the walk around with the mechanic:

1) He strongly recommended using premium fuel. This was a bit of a surprise because the manual says at least 87 octane unleaded is ok.
2) He recommended a hard break-in for slightly more horsepower, with the more gentle factory procedure being ok.
3) Oil changes at 250, 600, and 1,000 miles during break-in. Mineral oil for 1st 2 changes and then synthetic after that.
4) He also talked about 10 full heat/cool cycles: taking the bike on a ride to get it up to normal operating temp then letting it cool completely down. He said in his 30+ years of working on bikes that he has never seen any issues with that formula.

Have you gotten similar advice?
 

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BOTM Winner, June 2015
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842 Posts
I've never purchased a bike brand new so I can't verify the procedure. But congrats on the new bike! She's purdy!
 

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Way to go man! Look up the motoman method of hard break in on google. Its an interesting read if you want some experience and proof from a real engine builder. That's what I did on mine, but not many miles on the bike yet so I cant really say what the results are. I did my first oil change at 75 miles, and I have to say it looked fairly clean from what I could see. I plan on changing again around 600-1000 mark. I just ordered my windshield and HID headlight this week. Once I get those installed I am DONE with mods. I remember 2 months ago when mine looked like yours lol. Those were the days..... Enjoy and post lots of pics!
 

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If break in were as important as some people think it is half of the bikes on this forum would be being torn down and re-ringed. We've got everything from folks who follow the manual like it's the Bible, to folks who run it as hard as they can, to folks who just don't care. And yet their bikes all run the same! Supposedly there is dyno evidence to support a hard break in showing more power but all of the numbers I've seen were well within the margin of error. You take a sample size of just two bikes and one ends up with 1.5hp more? They could easily have been that 'different' right out of the crate.

If it makes you feel better to run it hard, run it hard. Personally, I'm a follow-the-manual guy. If you want power, do the "big 3", you'll get way more power than any silly break-in voodoo ritual. But you probably won't hurt anything with a hard break in either if it makes you feel better. (It's your bike, after all). These modern engines are machined and built to such tight standards it's really not a big deal. Back in the day engines were built on an assembly line were some guy with a file filed down anything that didn't fit quite right. Crude tools and machine to crank motors out quickly. They leaked, they needed major repairs. Engine rebuild shops were in every town. And since the parts weren't an impeccable fit, the engine sort of 'machined itself' as it ran. Don't let any old timer fool you with his "They don't build 'em like they used to" schtick. The stats are actually out there that modern engines last far longer than those built in the 40's, 50's and 60's. (But they are a LOT tougher to work on! I'll give 'em that!) So break-in was essential, to get all of those parts machined right. As were those frequent early oil changes; to get all of the metal filings out. The motorman thing is a good read, and it sounds really convincing; but it's mostly really small sample groups and a whole lot of "This is what I think happens" presented in the format of "This is what happens". Not a lot of good science. But, again, I don't think you'll hurt ANYTHING, so if you perceive that it'll give you a boost in power, by all means, do it. But, admittedly, I doubt someone would jump on a hard-broken-in 900 and a soft-broken-in 900 and see ANY difference, and I doubt a dyno would either. And both are gonna last far longer than most people are ever gonna own it. There's a guy on the forum here who put 150k on his, with conventional oil changes, who finally had to have a valve replaced because in 150,000 miles, he NEVER did the valve clearance adjustments (due every 15k or so, it might've changed though, I've heard certain years manuals give different intervals).

Today's engines, not so much. I'd still do the first early oil change, 500 miles, 100 miles, whatever makes you feel better. That'll get any metal shavings out of the system. But the fact is, most of the break-in is going to happen very early. And there isn't going to be that much 'crude engine machining' going on. It was ready to go at the factory.

As to the premium fuel; it won't hurt anything. It might run cooler. It won't really make any more power. I get some deceleration popping when running premium but others don't. And I don't know why I get that. But there are some myths about premium fuel. It's not cleaner, it won't clean your engine, it won't make your engine last longer (unless your engine requires premium, in which case 'regular' will harm it). It just is what it is.

My $0.02! Enjoy the bike.

If you want what I do, on both my new car, wifes new bike, and my new bike I'm taking delivery of later this week;

First oil change at about 100 miles. An inexpensive, motorcycle specific conventional oil (I use Valvoline Motorcycle because I can get it readily here). Then again at 1,000 miles. That's definitely overkill, but it's cheap insurance to not have any sort of manufacturing leftovers circulating in the oil system. After that, it's a normal oil change schedule.

Riding it home I keep the revs low, keep it off the interstate, and don't accelerate too hard. I'm of the opinion any ring-seating happened when the factory ran the engine and, if it didn't, was completed by the time I left the parking lot. But even so, I go easy. Makes me feel better I guess.

After a couple hundred miles I ride it like I always would. Maybe wait until that second 1,000 mile oil change before I really push it hard.

My 2014 Focus had no break in procedures listed in the manual. Service tech at the dealership said there IS no break in procedure. As he put it, the engines are built at such tight tolerances that when they start it up at the end of the line and drive it off of the line onto a big parking lot where it waits for a train, the break in is completed. Those few moments of running is all it takes. They still recommend an early first oil change (The manual doesn't, but the dealer does.) But, there really IS no break in on these newer engines. (But of course that's a tightly built American made engine designed in 2011, not a Japanese motorcycle engine designed 10 years ago; but it ALSO isn't an engine designed 30 years ago. Even motorcycle engines are built to tight tolerances these days).
 

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Living The Dream
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1,515 Posts
If break in were as important as some people think it is half of the bikes on this forum would be being torn down and re-ringed. We've got everything from folks who follow the manual like it's the Bible, to folks who run it as hard as they can, to folks who just don't care. And yet their bikes all run the same! Supposedly there is dyno evidence to support a hard break in showing more power but all of the numbers I've seen were well within the margin of error. You take a sample size of just two bikes and one ends up with 1.5hp more? They could easily have been that 'different' right out of the crate.

If it makes you feel better to run it hard, run it hard. Personally, I'm a follow-the-manual guy. If you want power, do the "big 3", you'll get way more power than any silly break-in voodoo ritual. But you probably won't hurt anything with a hard break in either if it makes you feel better. (It's your bike, after all). These modern engines are machined and built to such tight standards it's really not a big deal. Back in the day engines were built on an assembly line were some guy with a file filed down anything that didn't fit quite right. Crude tools and machine to crank motors out quickly. They leaked, they needed major repairs. Engine rebuild shops were in every town. And since the parts weren't an impeccable fit, the engine sort of 'machined itself' as it ran. Don't let any old timer fool you with his "They don't build 'em like they used to" schtick. The stats are actually out there that modern engines last far longer than those built in the 40's, 50's and 60's. (But they are a LOT tougher to work on! I'll give 'em that!) So break-in was essential, to get all of those parts machined right. As were those frequent early oil changes; to get all of the metal filings out. The motorman thing is a good read, and it sounds really convincing; but it's mostly really small sample groups and a whole lot of "This is what I think happens" presented in the format of "This is what happens". Not a lot of good science. But, again, I don't think you'll hurt ANYTHING, so if you perceive that it'll give you a boost in power, by all means, do it. But, admittedly, I doubt someone would jump on a hard-broken-in 900 and a soft-broken-in 900 and see ANY difference, and I doubt a dyno would either. And both are gonna last far longer than most people are ever gonna own it. There's a guy on the forum here who put 150k on his, with conventional oil changes, who finally had to have a valve replaced because in 150,000 miles, he NEVER did the valve clearance adjustments (due every 15k or so, it might've changed though, I've heard certain years manuals give different intervals).

Today's engines, not so much. I'd still do the first early oil change, 500 miles, 100 miles, whatever makes you feel better. That'll get any metal shavings out of the system. But the fact is, most of the break-in is going to happen very early. And there isn't going to be that much 'crude engine machining' going on. It was ready to go at the factory.

As to the premium fuel; it won't hurt anything. It might run cooler. It won't really make any more power. I get some deceleration popping when running premium but others don't. And I don't know why I get that. But there are some myths about premium fuel. It's not cleaner, it won't clean your engine, it won't make your engine last longer (unless your engine requires premium, in which case 'regular' will harm it). It just is what it is.

My $0.02! Enjoy the bike.

If you want what I do, on both my new car, wifes new bike, and my new bike I'm taking delivery of later this week;

First oil change at about 100 miles. An inexpensive, motorcycle specific conventional oil (I use Valvoline Motorcycle because I can get it readily here). Then again at 1,000 miles. That's definitely overkill, but it's cheap insurance to not have any sort of manufacturing leftovers circulating in the oil system. After that, it's a normal oil change schedule.

Riding it home I keep the revs low, keep it off the interstate, and don't accelerate too hard. I'm of the opinion any ring-seating happened when the factory ran the engine and, if it didn't, was completed by the time I left the parking lot. But even so, I go easy. Makes me feel better I guess.

After a couple hundred miles I ride it like I always would. Maybe wait until that second 1,000 mile oil change before I really push it hard.

My 2014 Focus had no break in procedures listed in the manual. Service tech at the dealership said there IS no break in procedure. As he put it, the engines are built at such tight tolerances that when they start it up at the end of the line and drive it off of the line onto a big parking lot where it waits for a train, the break in is completed. Those few moments of running is all it takes. They still recommend an early first oil change (The manual doesn't, but the dealer does.) But, there really IS no break in on these newer engines. (But of course that's a tightly built American made engine designed in 2011, not a Japanese motorcycle engine designed 10 years ago; but it ALSO isn't an engine designed 30 years ago. Even motorcycle engines are built to tight tolerances these days).

What he said!:D

And just for reference, I am of the caliber of those who just don't care. Ride it like you stole it!
 
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