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Here in the land of Oz we have 91, 95 or 98 octane petrol available. Is using98 octane petrol worth the extra money in a low performance engine? I use 98 in my outboard motor and a smaller bike because they use bug*er all fuel and so cost is not an issue. I don't mind paying extra for the vulcan however if it causes no harm.
 

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Higher octane fuel is made for long stroke engines. There for it is made to burn slower and for a longer time. Lower octane fuel burns faster and with more power. Thats why you will get a knock if you use it in any kind of high output engine. There for you should be using the high octane fuel in your vulcan and lower octane in your lawn mowers and outboards. Hope this helped. Keep both wheels down. Be safe.
 

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Is using98 octane petrol worth the extra money in a low performance engine?
Higher octane rating means the fuel is more resistant to pre-ignition (pinging). It is generally used in engines with a high compression ratio, which tend to ping under heavy acceleration.

The rule of thumb is to use the lowest octane that does not cause pinging. Check your bike's owner manual to see what octane rating is recommended.

Using higher octane than required may result in reduced performance and increased carbon buildup.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octane_rating

Joe
 

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Not bad, just a waste of money. My US bike runs fine on 87 octane. I don't know what that is for imperial gallons...
 

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I use 87 octane on my vn2000 most of the time, using higher octane will leave less deposits in the engine because it burns faster and does not leave unburned fuel behind causing preignition, I do not see myself paying more for high octane fuel

on the other hand when I used to race desert here in so. calif. I would use 102 octane aviation fuel on my kx 250 to prevent fouling plugs
 

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octane

I see that under the seat of my 07 1600 classic, the fuel category states, research octane (RON) 95. While in Hays Kansas I fueled up with the highest octane available in town and added Harley-Davidson octane boost additive as per instructions on the bottle and she ran like a champ. It was 100 plus degrees that day. I have used another called liquid horse power but haven't had the same "good" results as th H.D. additive? Seems to run rough.?
 

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octane

I failed to mention that I changed out the air intake, added a power commander and had it dyno tuned prior to running the additives.... ? :confused:
 

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Kawasaki does not require a high index. I respect the user guide. I roll with 95 octane
 

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Owner's manual says 91 RON or above. I use 91 pretty much all the time, 95 now and again when prices are lower. When I got the bike the dealer told me to avoid 98 as the added detergents could damage motorcycle engines. He claimed to have seen very low mileage bikes that needed engine rebuilds because of valve damage caused by high octane fuels. Not sure about that as I always ran my old CBR600 (compression 12:1) on 98 because it performed noticeably worse on anything less. I certainly don't think there's anything to be gained by using 98 in the Vulcan. For what it's worth mine seems to prefer the BP fuels.
 

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All higher octane gasoline does is work to prevent knocking/pinging in higher compression engines. Lower octane (i.e. 87 octane in the U.S.) fuel produces more energy than, say 91 octane gasoline. The only benefit you will see from using fuel with a higher octane rating is a lighter wallet. In fact, you may experience excess carbon build-up in the engine, as mentioned above. Higher octane doesn't mean "better" gasoline. All it means is you will have less issues with pinging/knocking when under heavy load, especially during hot weather operations.

As a side note, I understand that the octane rating of fuel varies from country to country, and that European octane determination is different from here in the States. Yet I suspect that the 95 octane in Oz is probably the equivalent to 87 or 91 octane here. I use 87 octane in my 900LT and have no problems with pinging or knocking. An engine with a long stroke, such as the bigger Vulcans and HD's may require higher octane fuel, period.
 

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If the sticker on your bike recommends 91 RON, as mine does, that equates to the 87 octane sticker you see on the gas pump (in the US at least). So if you're running the higher octane fuels you're probably wasting $$ on gas. I use 87 octane with no problems.
 

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Not this again. I thought we had beaten this subject into a bloody carcass and dragged it out to the dumpster a long time ago. :rolleyes:
 

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Look at Octane as Rate of Burn and consider that if a slow burning fuel is still burning when the exhaust valve is opening you are wasting power.
Length of stroke has nothing to do with it, Compression ratio has everything to do with it.
So, There is no reason to buy high octane and then add octane booster as this will just dampen power and burn hot in your pipes.
Burning regular gas will insure burn is done by the bottom of power stroke and only spent used gasses go out pipe, and it should sound off with a sharp resounding crack than a dull poof.
Then, if you want to go further we could discuss the build up of COKE in the combustion chambers too ! Which is something Harley likes so they can dick yer wallets.
 

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I actually get a bit of backfiring with the higher octane, meaning that all of the fuel isn't even burning and it's continuing to burn through the exhaust system. Not good! Run the lowest octane rating that doesn't cause pinging.

Also, US/Australia Octane ratings are different. So when we talk about 93 being too high, that's more equivalent to your 98.
 

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BACKFIRE = Combustion fireing early back through intake system !
EXHAUST POPPING = Dull popping would be combustion continuing through exhaust, Sharp popping would be a air induction blending with unburnt fuel ending with a sharp ignition and explosion within pipes.
This is a pretty close definition of actual happening. We need to know what words we use so others can understand what we say is what we mean ! Otherwise include intake or exhaust with the word backfire.
 

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In Belgium , 95 octane is the smallest :mad:
There are 2 different methods of calculating octane rating. The method used here in the USA gives lower numbers than most other places in the world.

Your 95 octane is comparable to our 91. 87 is usually the lowest available here.

Joe
 

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RON is Research Octane Number.
MON is minimum octane number.

RON+MON/2 is how you determine which octane fuel to use at the pump...at least in the States. Since the OP is NOT from the states, I'm probably just making pretty, pointless noises. :D
 
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