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Custom or classic? The custom bars are one piece and would unbolt from underneath. The classic would unbolt from the top of the risers (underneath the caps) if only changing the bars. Not sure how the classic risers are attached. Be sure to disconnect the controls and place a towel or heavy jacket on the tank to protect it from scratches.

Not great instructions, but I hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The instructions I got for debaffling was a life saver. I sure don't want to start removing stuff from the handlebars without an idea of what I need to be loosening and looking out for.
 

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Yes, rag/towel over tank. Remove the controls and let it hang. If you new handlebar has serrations at the center, it will be easier to center the bar. Then you'd need a helper to hold the bars while you position/tighten. If the handlebar has no indent for the pin under the controls, just file that pin. Reposition or remove some of the cable stays. I went with zipties. Make sure the cables don't bind. Tighten the triple tree nuts underneath; they could be loose. Reposition the brake hose stays. When installed, turn fully the bars left and right to make sure nothing is strained. Check the brake and clutch cables if properly working. Train yourself a bit to get used to your new handlebars.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes, rag/towel over tank. Remove the controls and let it hang. If you new handlebar has serrations at the center, it will be easier to center the bar. Then you'd need a helper to hold the bars while you position/tighten. If the handlebar has no indent for the pin under the controls, just file that pin. Reposition or remove some of the cable stays. I went with zipties. Make sure the cables don't bind. Tighten the triple tree nuts underneath; they could be loose. Reposition the brake hose stays. When installed, turn fully the bars left and right to make sure nothing is strained. Check the brake and clutch cables if properly working. Train yourself a bit to get used to your new handlebars.

Hope this helps.
It does. I was looking at the controls and there are quite a few nuts and bolts. I just don't want to end up loosening the wrong ones and messing something up.
 

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Remove controls' bolts first, possibly remove mirrors so they don't get in the way esp if ur changing it out; then handlebar bolts. It's really just a plug and play kind of DIY but of course u gotta be organized too. When u remove the controls [they're in halves] check the insides so u know what to put back where. Be careful when tightening; it might tip the bike over when on sidestand. Good luck.
 

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I replaced the stock handlebar risers on both my and my wife's Classics, with Phat Riser 2's. That required removing the stock risers, which was easy as they bolt onto the upper triple tree from underneath. You say you want to mount mini-apes, so unless they are made with the attached lower mounting down tubes, you won't need to remove the stock bar risers.

First remove the controls, including the throttle cable, as you will need to re-route it behind the upper triple tree for added cable length. Then mount the new handlebars and attach the controls and switch housings. Yes, you may have to file off the little nub if the new bars don't have the hold already in them.

Check to make sure you have enough control cable length. With the 9" mini-apes, you may have enough length with the cables and electrical wiring to get by, but if not, you'll need to replace at least the throttle and clutch cables, as well at the front brake line.

None of this is difficult, but you will have some added expense if you need to replace any or all of the cables and brake lines.

Just as an aside, find out what the torque values are on the nuts that hold the handlebars/risers to the upper triple tree. You'll need that in case you have to remove them for any reason. When I did the risers on my Classic, I couldn't figure out why the bars looked straight when I was done, but when riding they looked crooked, off to one side a bit. Took it to the dealer who let me know that I hadn't torqued them down enough, and when I turned the bars to the stops, it caused the mounts to shift a bit. They re-aligned them and torqued them down properly and all was good after that.
 

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Most of the replies already have you covered. As long as you are not running wires inside the bars it is a pretty simple affair. In the past I've ran some small rope from a nail in the ceiling to hold my controls (while the bars come off) so they don't dangle or get scratched etc.

Some Metric bikes have control pins that protrude into holes or slots in the OEM bars. If you are buying custom aftermarket bars these holes or slots may or may not be there. I would just file off the pins, much easier than drilling holes in new bars and not messing up the finish.

I've seen many bikes hold find if you tighten the controls per specs. On my nomad the switches are not torque spec'd, but the clutch and brake control housings are torque spec'd. Torquing these is important. I once had some come loose on me a few yrs ago that I did not torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
After reading up, I am thinking that the pullback risers may help me accomplish what I am trying to do. The Phatrisers II sound like they are the right specs, but I hear mixed satisfaction with the product and the company. I am thinking a 4" lift and 2" pullback would do the trick. I have stumpy arms.
 
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