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When I tried to use the aforementioned diagnostic plug to "trip' my relay for horn/light, the voltage at the plug was 4-5volts.
The relay I had purchased did not like this lower voltage, It would not trip.
I ended up tapping in to a connection under the tank by "spooning" the tab in to the connector. 20000 miles and no issues.
 

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Hello all! Does the yellow lead wire come with the plug? I just need to tap into one point to hook up my radio.
If you do not need 12-13 volt than it will work. I beleve it is a female pigtail.
 

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Here's a approach to wiring your heated grips without using a relay or battery source.
Order a 35 Amp 3-Phase Bridge Rectifier from Amazon and mount it to the frame underneath the fuel tank. Splice the input pins to the three white stator wires. Connect the output to a spdt toggle switch inline to the heated grips.
Don't forget to put some heat-sink compound between the frame and rectifier. If you've changed the stator, you'll know where the stator wires are. I'm on my third one with a spare on the shelf. Instead of soldering the stator wires I used connectors. Makes changing the stator out a little simpler. Also be sure to stop oil from weeping down the stator wires. Oil ruins the connectors. Peal back the insulation about a half inch to expose the stator wires where they go through a rubber grommet at the engine case, expand the wire strands and rub some oil resistant RTV ( black RTV ) around the strands then slide the exposed section back into the grommet. Let the RTV firm up over night before tightening down the stator cover.
 

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I know this is an old thread but any chance of getting those pic's reposted? None are showing since I last checked this, not sure if it is me or host.
 

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I know this is an old thread but any chance of getting those pic's reposted? None are showing since I last checked this, not sure if it is me or host.
Since the OP hasn't posted since 2013 -- probably not. It's the Photobucket "pay us a fortune to link your pics" thing.
 

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They are easy to find. Mine were actually under the seat (found them after taking the right side panel off and being unable to find them)

Mine had a plug in it already (appears to be a sealing type plug just to keep the weather out) and was able to solder the tip of my wire, poke through the plug and have it plug into the required spot.
 

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Fair point trainermb... oh well

Does anyone know what the corresponding plug type would be for that 4 pin plug? I am not well versed with the types of electrical plugs

I would solder it in but I figure if it came with a sealed plug, the corresponding plug would also keep the weather out. It'd be great to plug in to that so then I can just tap any 12V I need into the plug. Figure I may want a cigarette lighter plug sometime in the future :)
 

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Not sure where you're trying to plug in or what you're trying to plug into that has a 4 pin plug -- there are a couple of auxiliary power leads on my 900 LT, and many other Kawis. I haven't been under there messing with things lately, but I'm pretty sure they're under the seat and they're terminated with standard trickle charger type plug/sockets. Some report that they aren't actually hooked up to power, but at least the wires are run already.
 

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Based on the text at the beginning of this post, and what I remember the pic to be, it is the diagnostic connector. I've also seen it referenced as the accessory power supply. I guess "pin" is the wrong word to describe the connections... It is a square plastic box with a weatherproof cover that has 4 connections inside.. One of them is ignition switched 12V which I need for the heated grips... I will get a pic of it when I have a chance. Worst case I will find a way to plug into the battery tender lead and just make it a habit to unplug when I use it :)
 

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You should only use the four pin plug on the right side as a switching wire and not a full on power lead.

Look at my garage and see how I have done it.
Not a big write up but i have put enough explantion on each photo for people to get the basic idea

Cheers
 

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If you are talking about my pics they are in my garage in my profile not on photobucket.
Check out my profile you will find them
 

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Thank you man, you saved my battery. I have a USB charging port on handlebar which I wired directly to the battery enden up with an empty battery after a few days. So I had detached it a while ago and it was sitting there useless. Thanks to you, I rewired it to this 12V output, now it has ignition switch on/off. Checked it after connecting, works perfectly.
There were also a 5V, 10.8V and an empty (ground I guess) pin besides 12V. Is that correct? I get 5V pin but what is 10,8V pin for? A weird amount of voltage.
 

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Sat nag power

Thanks for posting Scorpio_vette.
I've gone the cheapskate route and just spliced into the 12v line behind the diagnostic connector to power my newly aquired SatNav. All nicely soldered and shrink wrapped so quite neat and tidy. If I fit spotlights, heated grips etc. I'll use it as the trigger for a relay.
It's my first sat nav so can't wait to try it out. :serious:
 

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While I thank the OP for his time and effort posting his info I think a warning needs to be established. That positive line in the diagnostic connector the OP utilizes goes directly to the bike's ECU. Wiring up a relay to be triggered by this wire/line is very risky. The reverse voltage in a relay's coil that builds up and is released when the relay is opened (deactivated) can possibly fry your ECU. If it hasn't yet, you are very lucky and it's indeterminable if there is any protection at the ECU. You can use a diode for voltage suppression on the relay if you choose to use that wire/line the OP referenced. Using a diode connected in parallel with the wires on the relay prevents that built-up voltage from harming the circuit its connected to. I've seen 12Vdc relays build up and release upwards of 300V and higher when the relay is deactivated. Using a diode, like an 1N4007, across the relay coil, or buying a relay with diode suppression built-in, should be sufficient buy why take a chance of frying your ECU?

A safer source for ignition-switched power is the red wire that may be found, along with a black with yellow striped wire, in a connector on that same right-side of the bike. It is one of the protected cables coming out of the rear fender and terminates inside a clearish plastic protector along with those other cables. I hope the OP doesn't mind me using his picture for clarification. You can see the cable bundles from the fender going to that clearish protective cover just above that 3-connector relay housing.



That red wire provides power for the rear (brake) running and license plate lights. Splice into that red wire to provide power for your accessories relay. I highly recommend always using a relay with diode suppression for circuit protection. Always better to be safe than sorry.

For standard Bosch-type automotive 12vdc relays:

Contact 86: Wire from splice from the red wire I'm talking about. Also the diode's banded (cathode) side should also be connected in parallel to this contact.

Contact 85: Ground wire to battery or bike frame. Also, the other end of the diode (anode) should be connected in parallel to this contact.

Contact 30: Wire to the battery positive. This wire should be fused for safety.

Contact 87: Wire goes to your device(s) needing power, like lights, heated handgrips.

It's easier to use a relay with a built in diode, like a Cole Hersee RC-400012-DS-BX or similar relay. If you ever need to replace the relay just ensure to get one with the diode facing the same way (banded sided towards contact 86). For relays without a built in diode you can add a diode to the wires connecting to the relay coil. Here is a picture showing the diode crimped into the wire crimp contacts for this relay socket:



I don't want anyone frying their ECU, as I'm sure the OP doesn't either. That red wire/line I'm talking about is a safer circuit to use for ignition switched power.
 

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Well there you have it. FACTORY ignition SWITCHED 12volt. Use that to as a signal wire to activate a relay connected to a fuse block, and you can wire in all the accessories you want and it will all shut down when you turn off the key.

I'll continue this writeup showing what I did.

6-port fuse block from auto parts store


Automotive 4-pin relay (i used 40amp) from auto parts store


I then removed the plastic battery cover/tool tray (hate that thing anyways), and used a piece of flat steel to build a battery hold down/fuse block mount. I then used the 2 screws that hold the plastic tray in place to mount the flat steel. I marked and drilled the mounting screw locations for the fuse block, and bolted the relay to the front of the fuse block. you can see the relay between the fuse block and the gas tank.


Here is the new plug with the female end bullet connector, and a wire with a weatherproof male end bullet connector that goes to the signal pin of the relay.


Here is my finished product. battery hold down with relay and fuseblock all wired up.



Here is a video showing how with the bike off, the switch for the heated grips does NOT power on. But with the bike on, I can turn the heated grips on. And then when I turn the power to the bike off, the heated grips shut off also.


Nice install and a great job, very detailed write up. Thank you!
 

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While I thank the OP for his time and effort posting his info I think a warning needs to be established. That positive line in the diagnostic connector the OP utilizes goes directly to the bike's ECU. Wiring up a relay to be triggered by this wire/line is very risky. The reverse voltage in a relay's coil that builds up and is released when the relay is opened (deactivated) can possibly fry your ECU. If it hasn't yet, you are very lucky and it's indeterminable if there is any protection at the ECU. You can use a diode for voltage suppression on the relay if you choose to use that wire/line the OP referenced. Using a diode connected in parallel with the wires on the relay prevents that built-up voltage from harming the circuit its connected to. I've seen 12Vdc relays build up and release upwards of 300V and higher when the relay is deactivated. Using a diode, like an 1N4007, across the relay coil, or buying a relay with diode suppression built-in, should be sufficient buy why take a chance of frying your ECU?

A safer source for ignition-switched power is the red wire that may be found, along with a black with yellow striped wire, in a connector on that same right-side of the bike. It is one of the protected cables coming out of the rear fender and terminates inside a clearish plastic protector along with those other cables. I hope the OP doesn't mind me using his picture for clarification. You can see the cable bundles from the fender going to that clearish protective cover just above that 3-connector relay housing.



That red wire provides power for the rear (brake) running and license plate lights. Splice into that red wire to provide power for your accessories relay. I highly recommend always using a relay with diode suppression for circuit protection. Always better to be safe than sorry.

For standard Bosch-type automotive 12vdc relays:

Contact 86: Wire from splice from the red wire I'm talking about. Also the diode's banded (cathode) side should also be connected in parallel to this contact.

Contact 85: Ground wire to battery or bike frame. Also, the other end of the diode (anode) should be connected in parallel to this contact.

Contact 30: Wire to the battery positive. This wire should be fused for safety.

Contact 87: Wire goes to your device(s) needing power, like lights, heated handgrips.

It's easier to use a relay with a built in diode, like a Cole Hersee RC-400012-DS-BX or similar relay. If you ever need to replace the relay just ensure to get one with the diode facing the same way (banded sided towards contact 86). For relays without a built in diode you can add a diode to the wires connecting to the relay coil. Here is a picture showing the diode crimped into the wire crimp contacts for this relay socket:



I don't want anyone frying their ECU, as I'm sure the OP doesn't either. That red wire/line I'm talking about is a safer circuit to use for ignition switched power.
 

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Thanks! I actually think this wire is the better and safer alternative. I know from a past experience that ECUs are very sensitive to even small voltage spikes and that BK/YW wire feeds right into it.
 
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