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‘95 Vulcan 800 Custom
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I want to get my tires replaced, so I called several places near me. To my surprise, i got this as a lead-in question “what kind of bike is it?” Mind you, I said that I can provide the size it is. But these jokers said, “Oh we don’t work on that type of bike. We only service Harleys and Indians”. I’m sitting here thinking there no way in 2021 that you can’t readily get your tires replaced.

Oh, one place said yeah we sell the tire, but we don’t mount them. (Queue music from the Twilight Zone). I’m still on the hunt and I’m sure something will turn out. But these tires are dry rotted and I’m not riding the bike anywhere so I’m considering changing them myself (I’m familiar with the process). Sounds like I can also save a bundle if I buy online. One guy quoted me $300 for a rear 150/80 16 tire. I almost laughed out loud!

Tire spoons, rim protectors and rim strips are looking really good right about now.
 

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2008 Vulcan 900
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I called around about a front tire in Omaha, NE area. Cheapest one I was quoted in about ten phone calls was right around $180. I had one two days later from Revzilla for $75.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I called around about a front tire in Omaha, NE area. Cheapest one I was quoted in about ten phone calls was right around $180. I had one two days later from Revzilla for $75.
Yes, the first place I looked was online and the prices are considerably lower. But that’s the nature of online retailer… and I’ve NO problem with that 😄
They certainly are gouging in the mount/balance department.
 

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Administrator "Loose Nut"
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For years I always changed my own tires. Guess I'm getting older and don't like messing with bigger cruiser bike tires. The 21 inch tires on sport bikes are pretty easy, but 15 or 16 inch tires are a different story. Last few changes I've ordered my tires from Cycle Gear. Might not always be the cheapest, but very competitive pricing. If you buy the tire from them they charge $25 to mount and balance tire. Bring in a tire you purchased elsewhere they charge $50. I take my wheels off, deep clean the area while wheel is off, take to Cycle Gear, wait for change, come home and install. Works well for me. One thing about taking brand X to a shop that services brand Y. You are getting them outside their comfort zone. Face it, bikes are a specific performance vehicle to each brand. If you want to get the best specialist to work on you bike, take to dealer or look for for independent metric service shop.
 

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Just started this process Friday for my bike. Called local honda/kaw/yam dealer. They were actually real cool, gave me some prices but not a lot of availability. I mentioned i could order some and bring them in for install and they were perfectly happy to do that as well.
 

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I recommend you try replacing them yourself, it isn't that hard, just takes a lot of patience. Tubeless tires are easy. Tube type tires are harder but still doable. You save yourself money and become more familiar with the bike, which helps if you every find yourself with a road side issue.

If start and can't finish because you find that it is too much of a pain you can take the wheels and tires to a shop and they will probably charge less if the wheels are already off the bike.
 

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I recommend you try replacing them yourself, it isn't that hard, just takes a lot of patience. Tubeless tires are easy. Tube type tires are harder but still doable. You save yourself money and become more familiar with the bike, which helps if you every find yourself with a road side issue.

If start and can't finish because you find that it is too much of a pain you can take the wheels and tires to a shop and they will probably charge less if the wheels are already off the bike.
What do you do for balancing the tires? I have removed tires before on my previous VFR, and I bought all the tools to do so, but they are at my other house in SC and don't want to make the long trip. Only thing I didn't have to deal with was balancing, I removed the Vfr tire to patch it internally.
 

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I bought my tires and tubes from Competition Accessories. Removed the wheels and had the tires installed for $40. It also included balancing with Dyna Beads. Benefit of removing the wheels yourself is that you can clean and tighten everything you cannot reach with the tires on. Plus doing it yourself, takes away any doubt that the job was done properly. If you need to download a factory repair manual, go to www.Manualslib.com.
 

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What do you do for balancing the tires? I have removed tires before on my previous VFR, and I bought all the tools to do so, but they are at my other house in SC and don't want to make the long trip. Only thing I didn't have to deal with was balancing, I removed the Vfr tire to patch it internally.
I bought a balancing stand from harbor freight. It is not as good as the balancing they do with the high tech machines at shops. But I never ride faster than 70 so I don't notice a difference.
 

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I bought a balancing stand from harbor freight. It is not as good as the balancing they do with the high tech machines at shops. But I never ride faster than 70 so I don't notice a difference.
Regarding the balancing of the tires for those of us who mount our own tires, consider using RideOn. RideOn is a tire sealant that works to seal punctures. If you find a nail, just ride the bike for about a mile to warm it up and distribute the sealant, pull the nail and the sealant will find the leak and seal it. Unlike Slime, it cleans up easily and it also dynamically balances your wheels. I used it already without doing a static balance and I have not noticed any balance associated problems. Yes, these shops complain about people going to the internet for purchases and I am all about supporting your local dealer but not when they are price gouging people. Gone are the days of the local mom and pop dealerships it seems they all have gone big, multishop owned businesses with people that don't ride.
 

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I change my own tires and use balancing beads to balance. Thousands of miles, many at highway speeds, with no problems at all.
 
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Likewise, tires arrives yesterday, beads today. Ordered another set of wheel guards and pry bars for swapping. Will be a good weekend project and a good opportunity to clean my wheels up nicely.
 
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The first time I did a tire change was in the winter and the tires were as stiff as a newlywed groom on the first night of the honeymoon. After battling it for what felt like hours I took the tire into the kitchen, put the stove on 120 degrees and put the tire in the oven. After I had it in there for about 20 minutes the sidewalls were more pliable, and with the use of tire mounting specific lubricant, it went on without a problem. In the summertime I would just let them sit in the sun for an hour or so, turning over as needed and it should make it easier to go on. I'll never do it in the winter again.
 

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The first time I did a tire change was in the winter and the tires were as stiff as a newlywed groom on the first night of the honeymoon. After battling it for what felt like hours I took the tire into the kitchen, put the stove on 120 degrees and put the tire in the oven. After I had it in there for about 20 minutes the sidewalls were more pliable, and with the use of tire mounting specific lubricant, it went on without a problem. In the summertime I would just let them sit in the sun for an hour or so, turning over as needed and it should make it easier to go on. I'll never do it in the winter again.
Yeah, winter tire changes are definitely more difficult. I heat the garage as much as possible for my comfort, but reading your post makes me realize that I could carefully use my hot air gun to warm the tires and keep them warm while I'm working on them.
 
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A nice how to video.
 
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Ok, I want to get my tires replaced, so I called several places near me. To my surprise, i got this as a lead-in question “what kind of bike is it?” Mind you, I said that I can provide the size it is. But these jokers said, “Oh we don’t work on that type of bike. We only service Harleys and Indians”. I’m sitting here thinking there no way in 2021 that you can’t readily get your tires replaced.

Oh, one place said yeah we sell the tire, but we don’t mount them. (Queue music from the Twilight Zone). I’m still on the hunt and I’m sure something will turn out. But these tires are dry rotted and I’m not riding the bike anywhere so I’m considering changing them myself (I’m familiar with the process). Sounds like I can also save a bundle if I buy online. One guy quoted me $300 for a rear 150/80 16 tire. I almost laughed out loud!

Tire spoons, rim protectors and rim strips are looking really good right about now.
Cycle Gear. Good price good job but they don’t take the tire off the bike . But it’s still fine with me.
 

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Yeah, caught that how-to vid earlier in the week. that’s what made me realize it’s a no-brainer.
Time, energy, and butt load of elbow grease.
 
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