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i posted the other day about my oil leak, i had a small ammount of oil leaking from my filter cover, so i checked my filter and put a clean filter in, drove it around the block and thought everything was ok,, but went to the store and noticed oil all over my pipes etc. added oil and checked oil on a level surface and with just a little showing on the dipstick started back home, after a couple of blocks i had to stop. and oil was pouring out, must have been close to a quart on the ground,, do these have a pvc valve, the only thing i see that could cause this is the air switch, which has a line from each cylinder?? ?
the bike runs good . but i can't understand how the oil is coming from..thanks larry from shawnee.ok....
 

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I had a vtx 1800 before I got my 2000, I had changed the oil on the vtx and replaced the filter and took it out for a ride, when i got back i notice a leek. It was cause by the gasket from the old filter staying on the engine.
 

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oil level

i posted the other day about my oil leak, i had a small ammount of oil leaking from my filter cover, so i checked my filter and put a clean filter in, drove it around the block and thought everything was ok,, but went to the store and noticed oil all over my pipes etc. added oil and checked oil on a level surface and with just a little showing on the dipstick started back home, after a couple of blocks i had to stop. and oil was pouring out, must have been close to a quart on the ground,, do these have a pvc valve, the only thing i see that could cause this is the air switch, which has a line from each cylinder?? ?
the bike runs good . but i can't understand how the oil is coming from..thanks larry from shawnee.ok....
You have over filled your oil.If you have a V2K they are very specific on how to check the oil you can't check it after riding.
 

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You have over filled your oil.If you have a V2K they are very specific on how to check the oil you can't check it after riding.
wscuellar's V2K is right; one of the biggest mistakes riders of V2K's make is to overfill their oil. Most owner's (not all) of V2K's check their oil "cold" and on level ground. Even then, it's difficult to read the oil stick correctly! These beasts hold 5.8 quarts totally empty. If you remove all 3 drain plugs (watch not to strip the clutch plug!), just add 5.5 quarts when you refill and you won't have any problems. If you overfill though, expect the "oil bath" from the air filter!
 

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The key is all 3 drain plugs. The VN2000 has a separate wet sump chamber that is a part of that 5.8 quarts it says ti fill it with. The chamber holds almost a quart itself. So now you might have 6.8 quarts of oil which will expell it through the oil breather
 

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Kawasaki Motors Corp., Usa

i posted the other day about my oil leak, i had a small ammount of oil leaking from my filter cover, so i checked my filter and put a clean filter in, drove it around the block and thought everything was ok,, but went to the store and noticed oil all over my pipes etc. added oil and checked oil on a level surface and with just a little showing on the dipstick started back home, after a couple of blocks i had to stop. and oil was pouring out, must have been close to a quart on the ground,, do these have a pvc valve, the only thing i see that could cause this is the air switch, which has a line from each cylinder?? ?
the bike runs good . but i can't understand how the oil is coming from..thanks larry from shawnee.ok....
If you would like to see scanned pages; page 1 and page 2 I have put the text version below but there might be a typo or two so if you have any questions look at the scanned pages.

Dear Vulcan 2000 Owner:

Thank you for purchasing the Vulcan 2000, Kawasaki's newest flagship cruiser.

Because the Vulcan 2000 has a unique semi-dry sump lubrication system with separate oil chambers in the crank room, clutch side cover and transmission room, the engine oil level indicated on the dipstick is very sensitive to oil temperature, the motorcycle's position and engine RPM at time of shut down.

Under certain conditions, oil can accumulate in the crank and clutch areas and give a false low reading on the dipstick in the transmission room. This can result in false low readings and oil overfilling, which often leads to oil being pushed out of the crankcase vent and into the airbox.

Use the following procedure, which is also outlined in the Owner’s Manual, for checking oil level:

Verify Engine Oil Presence
Before starting the engine, verify that the engine contains oil by removing the oil filler cap/dipstick in the lower right side of the engine. If the dipstick is dry, tip the motorcycle slightly to the right and look thru the filler hole until oil appears. If no oil appears even when the machine is tipped at an extreme angle, remove the oil drain plugs to empty any oil that may be in the transmission, crankcase and clutch cover. Reinstall the drain plugs and refill with the specified amount of oil. Continue with Engine Oil Level Inspection.

CAUTION: If the engine is run without oil, it will be severely damaged.

Engine Oil Level Inspection
After you have verified that the engine contains oil, start the engine and allow it to idle for several minutes to thoroughly warm the oil in the transmission room to 125 degrees Fahrenheit according to the following chart:

Air Temp Idle Time
40 degrees 15 minutes
65 degrees 10 minutes
100 degrees 5 minutes

*NOTE: During this time the auxiliary cooling fan may be activated several times.

After allowing the engine to idle for the specified time, shut it off. DO NOT REV THE ENGINE AND SHUT IF OFF AT HIGHER THAN IDLE RPM. Doing so can leave a significant amount of oil in the crank room and clutch area, leading to a false low oil level reading.

Allow the oil to settle for several minutes. With the motorcycle level from front to back and side to side, remove the oil filler cap/dipstick and wipe the dipstick clean. Continue holding the motorcycle upright and reinstall the dipstick, threading the cap completely in. Remove the dipstick and check the engine oil level. The engine oil level should be between the high and low level lines on the dipstick.

If the oil level is too high, remove the excess oil through the filler opening using a syringe or other suitable device. If the oil is too low, add oil to reach the correct level. Use the same type of oil that is already in the engine.

Replace the cap, making sure the O-ring is in place and tighten.

Following this procedure should provide an accurate oil level reading. If you feel you are not obtaining accurate readings using this method, please see your local Kawasaki dealer for further assistance.

Sincerely,

KAWASAKI MOTORS CORP., USA
 

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<<<<With the motorcycle level from front to back and side to side, remove the oil filler cap/dipstick and wipe the dipstick clean. Continue holding the motorcycle upright and reinstall the dipstick, threading the cap completely in. Remove the dipstick and check the engine oil level. The engine oil level should be between the high and low level lines on the dipstick.>>>>

This is probably the most overlooked part of checking the oil on a V2K. The bike has to be standing straight up when you check the oil, you can not check the oil with the bike on the kickstand. I have seen and heard so many problems with this procedure and it really is simple when you do it a couple times. If you check the oil on the kickstand it will take 3/4 to 1 full quarts of oil to get it to register on the dipstick when the oil was already at the correct level standing up.

What I do is warm it up, no revving just idle, shut it off and let it set for 15-30 minutes, pull out the dipstick and wipe it clean, screw the dipstick back in, while standing on the right side pull the bike off the kickstand till it is balanced straight up and down and hold it there for about a minute, this gives the oil plenty of time to level out in the engine. Then let the bike back down on the kickstand and immediately pull out the dipstick and it will have the oil on the crosshatch still at its highest level that it obtained while being held upright.

I have done this since day one, and when I change oil & filter, I drain all 3 plugs, and it takes exactly 5.7 quarts to get a reading of 3/4 up the crosshatch.

It has never blown any oil, even with some high speed WOT runs.
 

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RePost

VulcanRide-Could you move/copy your excellent post to the HOW TO section. It would be a great addition there. :)
 

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I just serviced my 2008 Vulcan vn2000 classic Lt at 6,400 miles. I was chasing an antifreeze leak between the cylinder (top left side) so I took off both chrome covers left and right. Breather cover had about 2 cups of oil pour down the engine onto the floor. This is the first anything that has the hardest oil level check. Through the winter with 20w50 oil I sometimes would start the bike and have a valve tap loud in front cylinder. I would turn it off and add about a 1/4 quart of oil. Restart and the tap would go away. I thought maybe I had overfilled the oil for it to be in the breather cover. A friend reminded me that I had droped my bike on an inclined driveway when I was tryig to turn around and attempted to put my foot down on the low side. By the time I reached the pavement, the center of gravity was too much and I lowered her to the ground as easy as possible. Laid on the right side. I believe this is when the oil got into my breather. Something to think about besides overfilling.
 
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