Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How much air or in my case nitrogen do you ride on? Dealer told me 36 psi front and 40lbs rear? My rear tire seems to be flat shape in the middle about 3 inches wide.I am 6'2" and a light 260 lbs{I am big boned:eek:}
Thanks Eric
 

·
wocka, wocka, wocka
Joined
·
5,618 Posts
more air = more miles

How much air or in my case nitrogen do you ride on? Dealer told me 36 psi front and 40lbs rear? My rear tire seems to be flat shape in the middle about 3 inches wide.I am 6'2" and a light 260 lbs{I am big boned:eek:}Thanks Eric
boners, yous a big'un. need mucho more air to keep all that mass airborne. try 40-45psi front n rear. dont be afeared, it wont hurt yor tires none. I run my tires thisaway and then dont worry if I cant check em every time out. by time I get roun to it, theys might be down 5 or so but never skirt near the low end where they perform poorly or wear fast. 45 is a good number. I get max life out of my tires and run em hard in the corners. no problemo. out, ponch
ps. thats 13k on that rear. squeazed the last out of that buffalo nickel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
If air is 98% nitrogen how much are you paying for that extra 2%. There is a scale that is available that will tell you what pressure you need based on the weight that the bike is carrying. I don't have it but the shop where I get my work done has one. I'm also big boned at 5'11" 240 lbs. Keep the rubber on the road. ( PS I work in the quality department of a tire plant and using nitrogen does nothing for you. Trust me on this one )
Fred
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
571 Posts
Check your owner's manual

Your owner's manual should list standard tire pressures for your tires, assuming you are running the OEM sizes. Some manuals also give an upper range if you are carrying extra weight, which by your description, you can just assume the bike is in fact "carrying extra weight" (sorry, friend).

If it only lists the pressures at a normal load, you can probably add 3 lbs safely to the rear and 2 lbs safely to the front, above what they list. The tire manufacturer (they all have web sites) will also provide you with technical information on maximum pressure for the tire.

Correct or even slightly higher pressures will make sure your tires get warmed up properly, thus giving you better traction on corners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
Maintaining and running proper air pressure is certainly a good thing, and a good idea to keep an eye on, particularly for a bike.

Your concern, however seems to be the 3" flat strip on your tire. That's normal wear for a rear tire and unless you're racing all the time using the sides of the tire, it's to be expected.

The rear tire wears like that simply because that's where most of the acceleration, braking, and maintaining road speed occurs... right through the middle of the tire. The front tire just rolls along until you apply the front brake, that's why it lasts much longer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
571 Posts
What Helek 52 said. No way to avoid the flat spot, unless you are only riding around corners. The manufacturers try to minimize this by using a different compound of rubber for the center of the tire, but it only goes so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I try and keep mine set at the bike's manufacturer specs. These are located on the rear sway bar usually. BUT the bike manufacturer sets theirs to the best comfort. Sometimes the tire manufacturer recommends a high pressure for better performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for everyones help.
I will be checking with the book and makers of the tire. Special thanks to Fred in the tire plant.
PS I sent you a PM
Eric
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
So which pressure do you go with, the one listed on the bike or on the tire? Also what should be the pressure increase when riding 2 up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
571 Posts
Yeah, the tire's published pressure on the sidewall is the max.

Vehicle manufacturers have to publish their own tire pressure ranges for the vehicle in the owner manual or on a decal on the vehicle itself, or both.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top