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Discussion Starter #1
I realize there are a lot of factors involved regarding stop and go riding, riding style and habits, city and country. I'm just curious as to how many miles people have gotten out of the stock pads on their 900's before replacing them. Thanks in advance. RIDE SAFE
 

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I didn't replace my rear pads until ~20k miles, the fronts were still good when I pulled 'em, so I left 'em. Dunno how that compares to most riders, but gives ya my stats...
 

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I have just reached 11,000 miles and still have some left the front is worn more than the rear Will be replacing in another thousand miles maybe
 

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I just checked mine last week at 22k miles. Fronts still look great; inboard rear is getting very close. I'll probably replace the rear pads some time in August. That really surprised me. This is the first bike I've owned that the fronts outlasted the rear.
 

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Hi Just to let you know.OE pads are almost twice the thickness of any aftermarket brands.This leaves your pistons out too far too long.That leads to problems.36000 on rear then replaced.48000 on front still good.Just FYI.Thank you Bill
 

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It is interesting that some bikes have the rear brake pads wear faster than the front. I've yet to use my rear brake, other than testing them to see if they actually work.
Every street bike I've ever owned I've had to replace only the front pads. Of course my dirt-bikes were about equal 50/50 front/rear.
 

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It is interesting that some bikes have the rear brake pads wear faster than the front. I've yet to use my rear brake, other than testing them to see if they actually work.
That's kinda scary, man. MSF courses teach ya to use both brakes, and there are specific instances in which rear brakes only are recommended. Can't imagine gravel, wet streets, or low speed maneuvering without the use of back brakes.
 

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That's kinda scary, man. MSF courses teach ya to use both brakes, and there are specific instances in which rear brakes only are recommended. Can't imagine gravel, wet streets, or low speed maneuvering without the use of back brakes.
+1111111111
Couldn't have said that last sentence any better.
Changed my rear pads at ~32k, fronts still fine @~40k.
 

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That's kinda scary, man. MSF courses teach ya to use both brakes, and there are specific instances in which rear brakes only are recommended. Can't imagine gravel, wet streets, or low speed maneuvering without the use of back brakes.
Yeah a buddy of mine was just telling me this weekend that he had been coming down a steep, curvy dirt road in the mountains. As he entered a sharp curve at less than 10mph, he grabbed a little to much front brake and locked the front tire in the loose gravel. He literally pushed the front tire sideways for a couple yards before his brain unlocked from panic mode enough to let go of the brake lever. Rear brakes are a must on slick or loose surfaces. And the bike will stop much faster on good surfaces if you use both brakes evenly.
 

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After my original set of pads wore,I went to EBC front and rear. My back breaks wore faster than the front with EBC,and the front breaks seemed to squeal more ....went back to OEM brakes on both have 13,400 on rear brakes with alot of pad left
 

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Hi, just changed the rear at 39k. Replaced with EBC HH that I bought some time ago. The OEM had a little more than the 1mm service limit. The front pads measure 1/8 of an inch, but I ordered OEM front pads from Ronayers. After researching, it seems like OEM pads are they way to go. I'll check the rear and order whatever looks to work better for me.
Ride safe!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to everyone who took the time to reply

Just wanted to say thanks. There are some great people on this site and I appreciate their input. RIDE SAFE
 

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To the guy who hasn't used his rear brake:

If you've got a front wheel drive car, do a little experiment. Pull the emergency brake all the way tight, and give it a little gas (not much, not trying to burn out here). What you'll notice is the front end goes down and STAYS down, what's happening is, the back brakes (which are what are activated when you pull the emergency brake on a car) are like an anchor holding the car. Now this is a 'backwards' example, because your not moving, when you are moving, it has the opposite effect, it anchor the front end UP and prevents it from nose diving heavily. Another great way to test this theory (and less dangerous than testing it on a bike), is a four-wheeler with separate brake controls (which is actually a great way to practice). You'll notice that while you don't gain a ton of stopping power, the 4-wheeler stays up, stable, and easier to handle when you mix in the back brake. Without using the back brake, the front end dives down hard and fast and the handling characteristics of the quad change dramatically.

If you don't have a way to test any of that, then just take my word for it. It's not about braking power, it's about allowing your front brake to do it's job correctly. It prevents you from going over the handlebars in an emergency stop (if nothing else, use it so your in the habit of using it), and keeps the bike maneuvering like it should when your slowing or stopping. While you should avoid using brakes around a curve, if you have to, the back brake is a much better bet than the front, in terms of being able to handle correctly.

Finally, it's a great way to keep wear down on your pads. I have a couple steep hills with low speed limits I have to ride down often, one of them is over a mile straight downhill with a 25 mile per hour speed limit. (And, as you can imagine, a shiny crown victoria at the bottom of it almost always). What I do, is downshift to a point that allows me to engine brake SOME without redlining the engine, and alternate front and back brake. As I ease off the front, I apply the back, then I ease off the back while applying the front. I've gotten good enough that you can't tell I'm switching brakes, the bike stays right at 25~30 miles per hour, and it prevents heat from building up on the brakes which can cause the rotors to warp or the pads to wear prematurely.

And, to answer the question, I've got 13k on my bike with OE pads and they still look good, just got an inspection an it passed, and my own visual inspections of the pads show they look good for another couple thousand miles at least.

Anyway, you really ought to invest in an MSF course. If your not using your back brake at all, there are probably other things your not familiar with (like countersteering perhaps). Not trying to be rude or anything, but I'd hate to see someone get hurt, or heck, spend more on maintenance for their motorcycle or not get to enjoy it to the full of it's abilities, just because nobody taught them the best ways to do certain things. The MSF is free in some states (Illinois is one, the state pays for it because they are proven to reduce motorcycle accidents), and a couple hundred bucks in others (but well worth it, drops your insurance down, too). My biggest fear with a riding style like that is a lack of 'muscle memory' for the rear brake, and in a panic you'll grab that front brake to avoid hitting something and "high-side", or go right over the handlebars because the back end isn't anchoring you like it's supposed to. Hate to see ya get hurt bud! Take these folks' advice, they've been doin' this for a while!
 

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Romans5.8, You made me laugh with your post.
I totally agree that students like yourself should definitely take a Motorcycle Safety Course. It gives you the basics for safe riding since you are a non-seasoned motorcyclist. One must start somewhere. However, having seen the results of a co-worker's instruction by a MSC convinced me most of the instructors have very limited knowledge of motorcycle riding.
Obviously, when riding on gravel or dirt or sand one would use the rear brake on a motorcycle. However, when on pavement in normal riding conditions the maximum stopping/shortest distance will be when one uses only the front brake. I have be riding motorcycles since I was 10, dirtbikes, roadraced on roadrace tracks, dragraced at various dragstrips, attending California Superbike School at Long Pond, Pennsylvania (Pocono Speedway, and personally taught by Keith Code...if you've ever heard of him), and have even competed in roadraces illegally for money. I was even offered a privateer ride for an entire summer with all expenses paid. I am not one of your novice Motorcycle Safety Course instructors that got some certification from the state from somebody that doesn't even ride a motorcycle. I am the real deal.
When a motorcyclist brakes hard with his/her front brake, so hard that the rear wheel is either lifted off the ground or nearly lifted off the ground, while applying the rear brake, the rear wheel will lock up, causing loss of control! This is not rocket science! Use your head. You unload the rear of the bike, there is virtually NO weight on the rear tire.
I was also told by my co-worker about laying the bike down when one feels its inevitable he/she will be in a collision...what the Motorcycle Safety Course had taught. Another idiotic statement! One should never ever lay a bike down, unless of course that rider is inexperienced and using his/her rear brake and has lost control due to the Motorcycle Safety Course suggested use.
To avoid an almost certain collision, brake as hard and controlled using only the front brake (dry pavement and wet, but not sand, gravel, dirt). If one is absolutely certain the collision will happen, at the latest moment possible, release the front brake and steer to the right with all you've got. Never give up, if you do, you will most likely crash. Panic is for students!
That's my response to your very ignorant post. Ignorant not meaning stupid, just inexperienced and unknowing.
 

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Romans5.8, You made me laugh with your post.
I totally agree that students like yourself should definitely take a Motorcycle Safety Course. It gives you the basics for safe riding since you are a non-seasoned motorcyclist. One must start somewhere. However, having seen the results of a co-worker's instruction by a MSC convinced me most of the instructors have very limited knowledge of motorcycle riding.
Obviously, when riding on gravel or dirt or sand one would use the rear brake on a motorcycle. However, when on pavement in normal riding conditions the maximum stopping/shortest distance will be when one uses only the front brake. I have be riding motorcycles since I was 10, dirtbikes, roadraced on roadrace tracks, dragraced at various dragstrips, attending California Superbike School at Long Pond, Pennsylvania (Pocono Speedway, and personally taught by Keith Code...if you've ever heard of him), and have even competed in roadraces illegally for money. I was even offered a privateer ride for an entire summer with all expenses paid. I am not one of your novice Motorcycle Safety Course instructors that got some certification from the state from somebody that doesn't even ride a motorcycle. I am the real deal.
When a motorcyclist brakes hard with his/her front brake, so hard that the rear wheel is either lifted off the ground or nearly lifted off the ground, while applying the rear brake, the rear wheel will lock up, causing loss of control! This is not rocket science! Use your head. You unload the rear of the bike, there is virtually NO weight on the rear tire.
I was also told by my co-worker about laying the bike down when one feels its inevitable he/she will be in a collision...what the Motorcycle Safety Course had taught. Another idiotic statement! One should never ever lay a bike down, unless of course that rider is inexperienced and using his/her rear brake and has lost control due to the Motorcycle Safety Course suggested use.
To avoid an almost certain collision, brake as hard and controlled using only the front brake (dry pavement and wet, but not sand, gravel, dirt). If one is absolutely certain the collision will happen, at the latest moment possible, release the front brake and steer to the right with all you've got. Never give up, if you do, you will most likely crash. Panic is for students!
That's my response to your very ignorant post. Ignorant not meaning stupid, just inexperienced and unknowing.

Well I'm not sure what the MSC is but if you're referring to the MSF, that's taught by private instructors, it's not a 'state certification' thing. They are certified by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, they have to have several years of varied riding experience and it's about 60 hours of instruction before they even hit the road course to become an MSF instructor. You must own and frequently ride a motorcycle to apply to be an MSF instructor. (I wasn't going to drop a couple hundred bucks on a course without knowing who has teaching it! I looked this stuff up). So the idea that they, as you said, a) Don't own or ride a motorcycle or b) are novices seems preposterous. Unless, again, your talking about something else.

I'm curious as to your reasoning behind front ONLY being FASTER than both brakes. But hey, whatever float your boat bud. I'm speaking from what is taught by the MSF and is common knowledge in the world of motorcycling (plus riding quads for years and years, like I said, try one of those out front brake only, and then both brakes, the difference there is even greater than a motorcycle because of softer suspension).

Anyway, I think your in the minority around here with thinking like that. I'd also encourage you not to race illegally, you make the rest of us look bad and cause additional restrictions to be put on all of us by legislatures because kids on sportbikes have to show off and have no regard for anyone else and race on public roads. Take it to the track, after all, with experience and knowledge like yours, you'd probably do great!

Also, the MSF book itself has a quote in there about 'laying the bike down'. They say something along the lines of 'laying down to avoid a crash IS crashing, you should NEVER lay a bike down' and explain the science behind rubber-on-asphalt stopping faster than the metal and pegs scraping the ground. My MSF instructor was quite adamant about never laying it down. Perhaps you ARE talking about something called the 'MSC'? But I'm talking about the Motorcycle Safety Foundation course, it's technically called an "MSF Basic RiderCourse". Perhaps they are two different things, that, or your co-worker wasn't paying very good attention (or had a dumb instructor, it does happen!)
 

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Roman, when I said I had road raced illegally, that was when I was in my 20s...many moons have passed since then. Also, the illegal racing that I spoke off, well the roads were actually closed down with the help of illegal racing fans.:p

Just so you know, MSC stands for motorcycle safety course, which is now a requirement in order for one to acquire a motorcycle license in the state of Florida. It is endorsed by the motorcycle safety foundation. Okay? :at-wits-end:Good.
As far as me being a minority, you are incorrect. :watermelon:I'm European Caucasian. Most others have been seriously injured due to lack of skill, or know somebody that was seriously injured due to lack of skill. The reason that I am still riding is because of skill.:drool:
You should really read my entire post before replying to it. :rolleyes:I was referring to motorcycles, and not the 4-wheelers with which you are familiar. :confused:

Interesting point I would like to mention. Have you ever noticed that most motorcycles have larger brakes on the front wheel than on the rear wheel? Some motorcycles even have twice the brakes on the front wheel as on the rear wheel. Think about that for a while, you may come to a conclusion.:confused:
Anyhow, This is my last post. Be good folks, it's been an honor. :bye:
 

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I'm not an expert (and won't profess to be through riding experience, or anything else) -

- but I use both front and rear brakes as required.

But then again - as stated above, I'm not an expert.
(but I DID stay at a Holiday Inn Express a few nights ago)

:cool:
 

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Roman, when I said I had road raced illegally, that was when I was in my 20s...many moons have passed since then. Also, the illegal racing that I spoke off, well the roads were actually closed down with the help of illegal racing fans.:p

Just so you know, MSC stands for motorcycle safety course, which is now a requirement in order for one to acquire a motorcycle license in the state of Florida. It is endorsed by the motorcycle safety foundation. Okay? :at-wits-end:Good.
As far as me being a minority, you are incorrect. :watermelon:I'm European Caucasian. Most others have been seriously injured due to lack of skill, or know somebody that was seriously injured due to lack of skill. The reason that I am still riding is because of skill.:drool:
You should really read my entire post before replying to it. :rolleyes:I was referring to motorcycles, and not the 4-wheelers with which you are familiar. :confused:

Interesting point I would like to mention. Have you ever noticed that most motorcycles have larger brakes on the front wheel than on the rear wheel? Some motorcycles even have twice the brakes on the front wheel as on the rear wheel. Think about that for a while, you may come to a conclusion.:confused:
Anyhow, This is my last post. Be good folks, it's been an honor. :bye:
When I said your in the minority (not A minority), I was referring to your ideas about using the front brake only. To be honest, you are the first person I have ever heard that said using the rear brake in addition to the front INCREASES stopping distance.

Also, almost ALL vehicles have smaller rear brakes than front brakes, a car or pickup truck, motorcycle, etc.. The front brake IS the bulk of your stopping power. But the rear are still important. What happens is, as the rear brake gets applied, it creates drag in the back end, anchoring the bike and stabilizing it. I mentioned the 4-wheelers because it's easy to see that principle at work because of the very soft suspension.

Finally, if it's an MSF endorsed course, then it's not taught by people who have never been on a motorcycle.

Ride safe bro. Learn to use that rear brake! It'll only augment your great skills!
 

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I was also told by my co-worker about laying the bike down when one feels its inevitable he/she will be in a collision...what the Motorcycle Safety Course had taught.
Your buddy is full of it. The MSF curriculum does not teach that, and has never taught that. MSF training is very specific about keeping the bike upright.

They also spend a lot of time explaining (and actually practicing) the concept of weight transfer during braking. An entire segment of the program is devoted to "maximum braking", and every student that graduates knows exactly what happens to the rear end when you brake hard with the front. They know, because they've done it over and over and over until they learn how to do it properly, without locking up the brakes or lifting the rear wheel off the ground.

You're right, it's not rocket science... Students who have never ridden a bike before learn these techniques in about an hour.

Your comments make it obvious that you have no experience with the MSF training courses. Maybe you should try taking one some time so you'll know what you're talking about.

Joe
 
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