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Discussion Starter #1
I don't know whether this is my problem or my bike problem. I have a feeling that the breaking of my vulcan is not good, basically the rear setup but the front is ok. Last day when suddenly this stupid guy jumped infront of me i had a very tuff time on the road and i escaped narrowly which made me to show the bike to the local dealer. And as per them the breaks are fine and that is how this works. I ride a 2006 900LT with 11K miles, it got half used Bridgestone WWs 130 for front 170 for rear. I have seen myself that the brake pads are OK! My rides are only in the city are the roads here are in good condition.

And i used to ride a Suzuki M90 (1500cc) and to me which obviously had a better breaking setup than my Vulcan. How do you guys feel? may be it is just because of my wrong judgement? please help

reg,

cv
 

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I don't know whether this is my problem or my bike problem. I have a feeling that the breaking of my vulcan is not good, basically the rear setup but the front is ok. Last day when suddenly this stupid guy jumped infront of me i had a very tuff time on the road and i escaped narrowly which made me to show the bike to the local dealer. And as per them the breaks are fine and that is how this works. I ride a 2006 900LT with 11K miles, it got half used Bridgestone WWs 130 for front 170 for rear. I have seen myself that the brake pads are OK! My rides are only in the city are the roads here are in good condition.

And i used to ride a Suzuki M90 (1500cc) and to me which obviously had a better breaking setup than my Vulcan. How do you guys feel? may be it is just because of my wrong judgement? please help

reg,

cv
What exactly are you experiencing with the rear brake?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am not trying to stop it with the rear brake, but unfortunately it is not even getting slowed GOOD ENOUGH when only the rear is applied
 

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I am not trying to stop it with the rear brake, but unfortunately it is not even getting slowed GOOD ENOUGH when only the rear is applied
With enough pressure you should be able to lock the rear up but keep in mind that the majority (~70%) of braking power is with the front brake. The bike is 7 years old now so maybe one of the mechanic types on here will chime in.
 

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If the brake fluid is 2 or more years old, then change it. The fluid absorbs water and can make brakes "Spongy" when it get hot as the water boils into gas... I ride an 800B, with rear drum brakes, and it won't lock no matter what I do. Practice, practice and more practice. Use the front and rear together to get the most effective braking available and always leave yourself a way out. Ride safe my friend.
 

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I am not trying to stop it with the rear brake, but unfortunately it is not even getting slowed GOOD ENOUGH when only the rear is applied
As other posters have mentioned, a firm pressure on the brake pedal should just about lock up the rear tire. Hit the brake pedal in a panic stop and the tire WILL lock up. Sounds like the rear braking system needs a good going over. While you're at it, do the front too.
 

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Guys use the rear brake pedal like is its a car. Looks like a car brake pedal, works like one, feels like one....wrong! I will agree with you to some extent that the brakes are a lil shoddy. I had a Vulcan 900 and did all services so i know the brakes are perfect and had high end tires on the machine. With that said I only use the front brakes! Always have from sport bikes to my now Vulcan 1600. Trust me you won't fall down. Just squeeze it. Go to a parking lot and practice what it feels like when the front end dives. Also that's why I got rid of the 900 front brake aren't good enough. I found myself using both. Nothing wrong with that but my 1600 stops with just the fronts like a sport bike. Also the 1600 has dual front disc, 900 has a single. Not uncommon for guys to complain about braking on that thing. Also owned a 1500. Dont use any brakes in a corner!

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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The Vulcan 900 won't win any stopping awards, but to echo what the others have said. There are two major differences between your Vulcan 900, and a car.

1) The brake system is a very simple, unassisted system with very little fluid in it. That means it should be changed frequently. Personally I do mine every spring but I would never go more than 2 years. Chances are, it hasn't been done. Brake fluid is an often ignored maintenance item, usually folks wait until the brake fluid is so broken down it corrodes brake components, and then they rebuild calipers and re-do the fluid.

2) The brakes work the same as your car, except you are the one who controls which wheel gets the pressure! In your car, when you apply the brake, the brake system automatically (using valves, or even complicated computer setups) applies most of the pressure to the front, and some of the pressure to the rear brakes. When you brake, the weight of the vehicle shifts forward onto the front tire(s), meaning that the front brakes become very efficient, while the rear tires have very little weight on them and will lock up easily.

The Harry Hurt report said that a vast majority of severe motorcycle accidents involved too much rear brake, and little or no front brake.

You should never brake with just the rear. Truthfully, it should be a mix between the two with an emphasis on the front brake. You don't want to get in the habit of using the rear brake, because in a pinch you could mash the rear brake and not touch the front brake; simply out of habit!

If you are using the rear brake alone, the harder you brake the worse it's going to work. Because the quicker you decelerate, the more weight is off of the rear tire. It just doesn't work like that. I know all those cool choppers are rear brake only, but in a pinch they'll be on the pavement. Just all there is to it. The front brake is what stops you, the rear brake simply aids in that, and if used properly, shortens your stopping distance.

I can lockup the rear pretty easily. I would definitely suggest new fluid in both systems, but again; the best brakes in the world won't do you any good if they aren't used properly.
 

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Break set up seems pretty good to me. i have a 12' vn900 classic and have locked up the rear a few times. I havent made any adjustments to them.
 

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Change the brake fluid every 2 years? Shoot, now I know what I am going to do this weekend.
Just remember when that shiny black some spits out; it was supposed to be clear!
 

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Brake maintence due

Mine is due for a fluid change as well. But, as for braking power, I have had no issue with emergency braking. Use both front & rear, have not locked up the rear when both are used. I am a heavy front brake user, will even use just the front brake coming to a stop (distance allowing). When riding twisty roads will use mostly the front brake prior to cornering. Learned a long time ago to feather (modulate) the front brake.
 

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Us 800 guys have mechanical rear drum brakes. I just installed progressive front springs to help with the front end dive since I have to use the front (single disc) so heavily. No matter how hard I try there is no locking up the rear. I do feather it somewhat because I know that getting too comfortable with not beong able to lock it up will be dangerous. Someday, somewhere, road conditions, tires, whatever it will lock up and I have to be prepared for it.
 

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Those of us who rode in the 60s and 70s when all you had were drum brakes front and rear, think the 900 has FANTASTIC brakes. One of the first things I did when I started riding again after 25 years was to make a few E stops. Then I came here and one of the first things I read was how bad the brakes were on the 9s. All I could do was shake my head and think, if they only knew.:rolleyes: First order of business with anything is to learn to use what you have and learn all the limitations therein. The more expertly you use the front brake, the more effective the rear will be.

brake-break-broke-broken-braked Yep, they're all different. I hope my brake never breaks when I need to have braked to a stop.
 

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I typically use both brakes together but to each his own. If you want to see a more modern bike with bad brakes go ride a Suzuki S50. Single pot disc up front and a rear drum. I did not like that bike for that reason.
 

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So taking a peek at the owners manual it says to change the break fluid (front and rear) every 2 years or 15k miles whichever comes first. It also says to REPLACE the break lines and the rubber parts of the master cylinders and calipers every 4 years or 30k miles. This thread is getting more and more expensive by the minute.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
thank you guys for your inputs, especially you Romans5.8.

Yes it is a common knowledge to use both brakes. But my point here was, the way the rear brake feels when I do that seems it is just not doing the job, and the first thing i checked was the pad and found OK. After i heard from the dealer that "the brake is fine" i just thought of asking you guys whether it is just like that or some thing to be done. And now, as many of you said, need to check the fluid.

@pacomutt sorry for the spelling as um neither an english man nor from a part of world where people speaks english:D

rg,

cv
 
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