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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,
As some of you know, I bought a used 2006 Vulcan. The previous owner said he had rode it in the rain and not properly dried it off. This resulted in quite a few rust spots. When I bought it, I figured they would be relatively easy to get rid of, but didn't really know the correct method to do so. Here are the pics:


















So I need a way to rid my ride of this. If possible, an inexpensive way would be nice, but I'm open to any suggestions, including buying some of the small parts if that has to be done. I don't know where to begin, but I'm sure the experts on this forum can steer me in some direction.
-Rob
 

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He lied to you. It sat in the rain, for extended periods of time. The exhaust confirms that. If the bike is running it'll be hot, right? the water would not rust the hot exhaust.
Any way, each of those is so minute that it should be an easy job, problem is most of those parts will need be removed to handle them. For all the affected areas I would use Chrome Polish. You can buy it about any where, WalMart, Autozone, etc. Don't use it on the outside of your pipes because it is abrasive and will leave extremely fine minute scratches in the chrome. Small chrome pieces will never show the scratches, they are really fine.
 

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He lied to you. It sat in the rain, for extended periods of time. The exhaust confirms that. If the bike is running it'll be hot, right? the water would not rust the hot exhaust.
Any way, each of those is so minute that it should be an easy job, problem is most of those parts will need be removed to handle them. For all the affected areas I would use Chrome Polish. QUOTE]

chrome polish as stated above, try using it with a toothbrush for those hard to get to places.
 

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Hey all,
As some of you know, I bought a used 2006 Vulcan. The previous owner said he had rode it in the rain and not properly dried it off. This resulted in quite a few rust spots. When I bought it, I figured they would be relatively easy to get rid of, but didn't really know the correct method to do so. Here are the pics:


So I need a way to rid my ride of this. If possible, an inexpensive way would be nice, but I'm open to any suggestions, including buying some of the small parts if that has to be done. I don't know where to begin, but I'm sure the experts on this forum can steer me in some direction.
-Rob

For the components that aren't shiny, I would use crocus cloth or a copper toothed wire brush and CLP (Cleaner, Lubricant, Preservative). CLP is used by the U.S. Army for cleaning and maintaining weapons. It contains teflon which when dry, forms a thin protective coating. I used this method to maintain AH1F, AH-64 and AH-64D attack helicopter weapon systems for over two decades. (Not to mention my M-9, M16, M4, M60 and the big M2) The rust will not come off easy but a good portion of it will. Do not try this with anything you want to shine. For that, follow the previous suggestions. You can get CLP from anywhere that sells firearms.
 

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He lied to you. It sat in the rain, for extended periods of time. The exhaust confirms that. If the bike is running it'll be hot, right? the water would not rust the hot exhaust.
Any way, each of those is so minute that it should be an easy job, problem is most of those parts will need be removed to handle them. For all the affected areas I would use Chrome Polish. You can buy it about any where, WalMart, Autozone, etc. Don't use it on the outside of your pipes because it is abrasive and will leave extremely fine minute scratches in the chrome. Small chrome pieces will never show the scratches, they are really fine.
That's right. I ride all of my bikes in the rain, and not one of them has rusted like that. And by riding in the rain I mean commuting, so when I get to the office I'm not going to dry it, and it remains outside, uncovered. And when I get home, it gets parked in a covered garage, but I'm not going to wash it dry it daily, in fact, I don't wash them at all during rain season.

To me it seems like that bike was ridden on salty roads and/or sat for long periods of time under the rain.
 

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That's right. I ride all of my bikes in the rain, and not one of them has rusted like that. And by riding in the rain I mean commuting, so when I get to the office I'm not going to dry it, and it remains outside, uncovered. And when I get home, it gets parked in a covered garage, but I'm not going to wash it dry it daily, in fact, I don't wash them at all during rain season.

To me it seems like that bike was ridden on salty roads and/or sat for long periods of time under the rain.
+1 on this and the CLP post.

I do not have a garage to put either one of my scoots in - and they've BOTH seen action in the rain. The CLP will help a lot with all the various fittings and metal bits once you get the surface rust off. Never-Dull (comes in a can) is pretty good for REMOVING the rust, although you may need to use chrome polish or even a bronze or copper brush/wadding on some of the more stubborn pieces. Once un-corroded, the CLP will help keep it that way.
I'm TOLD that Windex is one of the better things out there to clean chrome with - once it's cooled down.
When I don't have time to thoroughly clean the bike after being ridden in the rain, I use a fresh water rinse, and an inexpensive leaf blower that I use only for blowing off the bike. My wife calls it the "Harley Hairdryer" and I can have the bike rinsed and dried off in a few minutes.
If you're one of those people who HAVE to buy expensive baubles for your "baby" - Harley makes a small hand held blower that they'll be happy to sell you for about $60.

You don't have to keep your bike in a hermetically sealed, climate controlled environment, and only take it out on sunny, low humidity, non dusty days to keep it in pretty good shape.


Ride Safe!
:cool:
 

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Yet another in agreement that you were fed a line. It sat outside for an extended period.

Looks to me as though everything except the tripletree and the exhaust can be fairly easily removed and buffed up. Maybe a dremel with an extension for the triple tree?

For the exhaust, i'd just get a high-temp, flat black spray paint and squirt it around in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the suggestions. I suppose I need to invest in some CLP first and see how good that works. I never knew that chrome polish was abrasive. I will try that on the small pieces as well if the CLP doesn't do the trick. I knew it had these eyesores when I bought it, so I won't complain or anything. Hopefully I can get all of the rust removed and eventually getting it shined to an acceptable degree.
-Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #11
He lied to you. It sat in the rain, for extended periods of time. The exhaust confirms that. If the bike is running it'll be hot, right? the water would not rust the hot exhaust.
Any way, each of those is so minute that it should be an easy job, problem is most of those parts will need be removed to handle them. For all the affected areas I would use Chrome Polish. You can buy it about any where, WalMart, Autozone, etc. Don't use it on the outside of your pipes because it is abrasive and will leave extremely fine minute scratches in the chrome. Small chrome pieces will never show the scratches, they are really fine.
I found some chrome polish and rust remover(combination) made by Turtle wax. It doesn't state anything about being abrasive or scratching. In fact it states opposite to that. Misrepresented on the package or is it just certain polishes that scratch? Thanks
-Rob
 

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When I first replied to this I either didn't notice or it has been added after wards but,,, 09 welcome to the forum, from your neighbor 110 miles up the street.
 

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For the components that aren't shiny, I would use crocus cloth or a copper toothed wire brush and CLP (Cleaner, Lubricant, Preservative). CLP is used by the U.S. Army for cleaning and maintaining weapons. It contains teflon which when dry, forms a thin protective coating. I used this method to maintain AH1F, AH-64 and AH-64D attack helicopter weapon systems for over two decades. (Not to mention my M-9, M16, M4, M60 and the big M2) The rust will not come off easy but a good portion of it will. Do not try this with anything you want to shine. For that, follow the previous suggestions. You can get CLP from anywhere that sells firearms.
I always keep a can of CLP with my bike and my m2, Gotta love the stuff. I store my bike outside so a sprits of CLP every few tanks keeps her nice and shiny. I do like 3 in 1 for my M-9 though.
 

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personally, I use Never-Dull on all of my chrome pieces. for the more "sticky" areas I use a scotch bright pad covered in oil. After I'm done with the scotch bright pad I throw a buffer in my drill and put on multiple coats of either Mothers chrome polish or Blue something or other chrome and aluminum polish. MAKE SURE you put some type of protective coating on your chrome after you use some type of cleaning material on it, or it will continue to rust.
 
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