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Hello Before I get my new pipes I was goin to debaffle my original pipes I have a 2009 custom 900 ,Is it hard I have no idea what to do or where to start Is it a do it your self job.I consider myself very mechanically inclined and have worked on and built alot of stuff so im not a virgin with tools in my hand Just a virgin on what to do to make this work Can anyone help???
 

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If you're getting new pipes anyway, I'd leave the stock pipes alone. You may grow weary of the noise and want the stock one back on in the future. They're expensive to replace!
 

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it is very simple i did mine in less than 30 min...i think there might be a instructional vid on youtube
 

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Hello Before I get my new pipes I was goin to debaffle my original pipes I have a 2009 custom 900 ,Is it hard I have no idea what to do or where to start Is it a do it your self job.I consider myself very mechanically inclined and have worked on and built alot of stuff so im not a virgin with tools in my hand Just a virgin on what to do to make this work Can anyone help???
I am with Pacomutt, if you are going to buy pipes anyway, leave them stock. If you want some sound with stock, debaffle. You won't need to buy pipes.

It is easy.

Stage 1-Get a drill, 12 inch extension and a 7/8inch hole saw. Run it up and cut out the plug. It takes about 90 seconds to do the whole thing.

Stage 2-Drill out the front plate. Bend back the metal tab. Cut the pipe. Drill 4-6 1/2 inch holes in the plate. Takes more time. I would read a thread with pics. Youtube has a few videos that are helpful as well. (I thought my exhaust sounded awesome at stage 2)

Stage 3-Not complicated, but not easy at all. It took me over 2 hours of sweating in a hot garage. The fact is, I didn't like the sound at all and bought pipes. I also felt as if I lost some grunt in the process.

If I could go back in time, I would have my current exhaust with a completely stock exhaust for a back-up.

With stock exhaust, stage 2 with 4 holes sounded the best.

Good luck.
 

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I am with Pacomutt, if you are going to buy pipes anyway, leave them stock. If you want some sound with stock, debaffle. You won't need to buy pipes.

It is easy.

Stage 1-Get a drill, 12 inch extension and a 7/8inch hole saw. Run it up and cut out the plug. It takes about 90 seconds to do the whole thing.

Stage 2-Drill out the front plate. Bend back the metal tab. Cut the pipe. Drill 4-6 1/2 inch holes in the plate. Takes more time. I would read a thread with pics. Youtube has a few videos that are helpful as well. (I thought my exhaust sounded awesome at stage 2)

Stage 3-Not complicated, but not easy at all. It took me over 2 hours of sweating in a hot garage. The fact is, I didn't like the sound at all and bought pipes. I also felt as if I lost some grunt in the process.

If I could go back in time, I would have my current exhaust with a completely stock exhaust for a back-up.

With stock exhaust, stage 2 with 4 holes sounded the best.

Good luck.
KenDawg, I haven't really looked into this, but the stock mufflers have a couple of pop rivets on their circumference near the bottom side of the mufflers. Couldn't these be drilled out, and the guts be pulled out?
Just wondering.
 

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Those pop rivets only hold the black cover in place at the rear. You do need to drill them out to get at the inside so you can cut the center pipe. You will need a sawsall with a metal cutting blade to cut the center pipe. Then you will need o drill 4-8 holes in the round plate around what is left of the center pipe. Unless you are going all the way at this point. Then skip the 4-8 holes and go straight to the big hole saw and sweating. I recommend getting some flat black grill paint to touch up the inside when you are finished. I think this made mine look much more professional in the end.
 

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Those pop rivets only hold the black cover in place at the rear. You do need to drill them out to get at the inside so you can cut the center pipe. You will need a sawsall with a metal cutting blade to cut the center pipe. Then you will need o drill 4-8 holes in the round plate around what is left of the center pipe. Unless you are going all the way at this point. Then skip the 4-8 holes and go straight to the big hole saw and sweating. I recommend getting some flat black grill paint to touch up the inside when you are finished. I think this made mine look much more professional in the end.
Not those pop rivets, There are chrome(!) pop rivets underneath the pipes. Takes a bit of looking to spot them. They're in the same area as the rear plate that everybody drills the 5/16" holes through.
 

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Not those pop rivets, There are chrome(!) pop rivets underneath the pipes. Takes a bit of looking to spot them. They're in the same area as the rear plate that everybody drills the 5/16" holes through.
That's odd.:confused: Mine doesn't have any pop rivets there. That plate on my bike was tack welded to the outer pipe. I saw some weld spots that had been ground smooth and then chromed over at the factory, but no pop rivets. Maybe this is a design change.
 

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FWIW
-and my 2 centavos is worth less than usual on this subject since I STILL haven't found time to mod mine yet (on this bike):

1. If you KNOW you're going to get aftermarket pipes...keep your OEM set unmodified. You may sell the bike someday, and the pipes can be sold separately. Non-modified used bikes are usually more desirable than "modified" ones, since mods are subjective things, and not all of us are as anal about fit and finish as the other.
In short: You will nearly ALWAYS get more selling a bike if you sell the aftermarket bits separately. This is especially true with seats, pipes, airboxes, and wheels, since they're expensive mods, and styles vary widely with the individual ride.
2. You may not like your new pipes. My V-mods (another bike) were the BOMB...for about 1000 miles. Then I got tired of having ringing ears all the time, FORTUNATELY I kept my OEM pipes for warranty work and I can switch em out in 15 minutes when I wanna change. Also, some pipes will actually cost you a few HP in performance, depending on where you snap the chalk line in the curve. I haven't seen a lot of write-ups in Vulcandom about this, but when you only have 50 to begin with...loosing ONE hurts.
3. Used OEM pipes in good shape usually fetch about 100+ bones on ebay. This is because eeeevery now and then somebody dumps their bike, and since GOD has a funny sense of humor on the subject, a lot of times the bike goes down on the starboard (right)side. "modified" pipes are sometimes harder to sell. Ever price OEM pipes at the dealer? Ever see what happens to MC insurance rates when you have a claim? Just sayin... :D

All this is just FWIW...and I would never discourage somebody from enjoying the bliss of modifying their own scoot - BUT just wanted to put some points out there to consider.

GOOD LUCK!
 
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