Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm not looking to ride in any colder than the mid 40's F. And at that point the only thing I can't keep warm is my hands, even with a good pair of winter riding gloves. So I'm looking for advice...

Battery powered or wired to the bike?
How much for decent quality heated gloves?
Any brands stick out as good or bad?
Do they heat the hands and fingers?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Search is your friend:

Regular Riding Gloves:
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/11-general-vulcan-talk/262050-do-you-wear-riding-gloves.html

Info. on Heated Gloves:
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/11-general-vulcan-talk/246066-heated-gloves.html

How to Wire them Up:
http://www.vulcanforums.com/forums/79-motorcycle-safety-riding-gear-discussions/244730-how-route-wiring-heated-gloves.html

I have First Gear's heated gloves, and they work great down to 25 or so, which is the coldest I've ridden with them on. The heat the fingers and back of palm area, you're looking at $200 and up for good ones IMO, wire to the bike, definitely. Gerbings and First Gear stick out as good (I've heard of the first, own the second).

-John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
Gerbings quality has gone downhill since the family sold the business. I would not buy them anymore. The son of the previous owner, Gordon Gerbing, has started his own brand, Gordon's Heated Clothing. I can't speak first hand about them, but they get very good reviews. They also get a lot of $$ for them!

First Gear makes excellent heated gear. I have a full setup. I got a pants and jacket liner with my Motoport suit (the liners are branded differently, but they are First Gear), I have FG gloves and Gerbing heated insoles. I have ridden at 10° F and my hands stayed warm with wind deflectors in front of the grips.

FG also has a wireless remote control that can be handy, too, and works very well. It cost a bit more than the wired control, but you can use hook and loop to mount it in a convenient spot without having wires that get in your way. Uses a couple of AA (or AAA?) batteries that last for a long time. With a Y-harness running up the sleeves of your jack and down and out the back to the battery connection, it is a lot neater.

I, too, recommend wiring to the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your replies.

Looks like I could buy the gloves, heat-troller and a Y-harness to use them on the bike. And I have some 3 cell Lipo's I could wire up to use the gloves off the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Thanks for your replies.

Looks like I could buy the gloves, heat-troller and a Y-harness to use them on the bike. And I have some 3 cell Lipo's I could wire up to use the gloves off the bike.
Yup, that's the setup I have (minus the LiPo batteries). Works well. I ran my wires that go to the gloves through my jacket for a cleaner look and to keep them out of my way while riding. They're *just* long enough.

-John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
Thanks for your replies.

Looks like I could buy the gloves, heat-troller and a Y-harness to use them on the bike. And I have some 3 cell Lipo's I could wire up to use the gloves off the bike.
The LIPOs are ok if they output 12V or you power the gloves without the controller. Using a voltage too much different from 12V (I think most LIPOs are 7.5V) could damage the controller, or the controller just might not work, depending on how it is designed. I suspect most controllers can handle a lower voltage, but I'm not sure. You may want to contact whichever manufacturers controller you get to ask about that.

If you bypass the controller, you can use any voltage from about 14.5V down to probably 5V - 7V. The problem with the higher voltages is that the gloves can get very hot, so be sure you either need an on/off switch, or a setup you can plug and unplug easily. Even at 10° F, I only ran my gloves somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 power. At 3/4 power, the gloves got so hot my hands were stinging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
What about heated grips ?
Then gloves don't matter.
I did some research into them - not so great if you have multiple bikes or don't have hippo hands. The grips heat the inside of your hands, but not the outside. The FG gloves I have heat the outside of the hand, which is greatly effective.

-John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Even at 10° F, I only ran my gloves somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 power. At 3/4 power, the gloves got so hot my hands were stinging.
Wow, with my FG gloves, at 25-35 degrees, I was running 1/2-3/4 easily, sometimes full power (cross winds) to keep my hands warm. Then again, as much as I like cold weather, my hands are the first thing to get cold. (I still wear a half helmet in the winter, with a mesh jacket w/liner and a sweatshirt, jeans, and boots.

Honestly, I'm thinking about getting heated socks this winter, and not riding below 32 degrees. While I'd love a full heated setup, it's just not in the finances right now.

-John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The LIPOs are ok if they output 12V or you power the gloves without the controller. Using a voltage too much different from 12V (I think most LIPOs are 7.5V) could damage the controller, or the controller just might not work, depending on how it is designed. I suspect most controllers can handle a lower voltage, but I'm not sure. You may want to contact whichever manufacturers controller you get to ask about that.

If you bypass the controller, you can use any voltage from about 14.5V down to probably 5V - 7V. The problem with the higher voltages is that the gloves can get very hot, so be sure you either need an on/off switch, or a setup you can plug and unplug easily. Even at 10° F, I only ran my gloves somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 power. At 3/4 power, the gloves got so hot my hands were stinging.
I just need to check in to a low voltage cutoff for the batteries, to keep things safe.
Here's a basic Lipo voltage spread.

Lipo's are rated at 3.7v per cell. A 3-cell is known as 11.1v
Fully charged = 4.2v per cell or 12.6v for a 3-cell.
Discharge = 3.0v - 3.3v per cell or 9.0v - 9.9v for a 3-cell.
The discharge voltage varies for a few reasons, mostly due to discharge rates. I like using 3.3v as a minimum.

I have a few quadcopters and all the support equipment (batteries, chargers, dischargers, low voltage alarms) otherwise I'd never consider doing this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I went with the Firstgear heated rider gloves, heat-troller and Y-harness.

Installation was straightforward and painless.
Fit of the gloves is slightly on the small size. All my gloves are Large or Xtra Large, going by the FG fit chart I need an XL. The XL fit snug but should break-in after a bit of riding. The gauntlets are on the small side considering they'll be used with heavy cold weather jackets. The small gauntlets make getting the gloves plugged in, pulled on and the wires tucked in a bit of a challenge. I have a bit of arthritis in both hands, sure that doesn't help the situation.

Put 200 miles on in 40-45°F at 50-80mph with the heat set between 1/2 and 3/4 and my hands/fingers stayed very comfortable.

I like the heated gloves and know they'll extend my riding season but the hassle getting the gloves plugged, tucked and pulled over my jacket is a negative that's hard to overlook. Heated grips and a good pair of gloves designed for heated grips would be a lot easier to use. Sure heated grips take more work to install but much less hassle once installed.
I may end up with heated grips by next fall, IF I can find the right set.

Thanks for all the advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
I hope the gloves work well for you. I found the fit to be good for me, but definitely agree about putting them on. What I've done is to route the wires through my riding jacket, using twist ties at the sleeve ends to keep the ends of the wires from going up into the sleeves. Then, when getting on my bike, I start the bike, put everything else on, plug the gloves into my jacket wires, plug the Y harness into the dongle on the bike, and then put the gloves on. I leave the gauntlets loose and then tighten them up once they're over my jacket sleeves. My jacket sleeves have velcro to adjust them tighter, at which point they just fit under the gloves. Once all the adjustments are made, I don't have to adjust the gloves any more.

-John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Just thought I'd throw this out there...I just got Gerbings heated gloves with all the wiring (have to buy a controller or on/off switch separately) for a measley $40 shipped!!!

I got them from Amazon,but I saw the same deal on Ebay too.They're suede instead of "normal" leather,so as the instructions say,you might want to apply something to waterproof them if you might ride in the rain.

They're nice and comfy too.I can't even tell from the feel that they have wires in them.Can't wait to try them out.

I'll update this,or maybe start a new thread about it,after I get to use them a bit.I'm hoping to get them hooked up tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Just thought I'd throw this out there...I just got Gerbings heated gloves with all the wiring (have to buy a controller or on/off switch separately) for a measley $40 shipped!!!

I got them from Amazon,but I saw the same deal on Ebay too.They're suede instead of "normal" leather,so as the instructions say,you might want to apply something to waterproof them if you might ride in the rain.

They're nice and comfy too.I can't even tell from the feel that they have wires in them.Can't wait to try them out.

I'll update this,or maybe start a new thread about it,after I get to use them a bit.I'm hoping to get them hooked up tomorrow.
That's heck of a good price. Definitely let use know how they work.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
If those cheap Gerbings are the Nubuck line, I think they have been discontinued. That's why they are so cheap. If you want 'em, you better get 'em before they are all gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
I think you're right Sabre,I should've mentioned that.The seller is called "h+h closeouts" both on amazon and ebay.

I got the wiring hooked up today and plugged them in for several minutes to be sure they work,but I didn't have time to take a ride.Had to change the super nasty oil so I wore the gloves while warming up the bike to prep for draining the oil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
I rode Sunday in the low-40s, with 20mph crosswinds. My FG heated gloves kept my digits nice and toasty - I'm pretty sure my hands were sweating at one point.

-John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Ken Phenix (https://kphenix.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/Flaming-Hot-Heated-Gear/) will either add heat to your current winter gloves for $100 or he can supply the gloves and add heat. I follow him on FaceBook and he does a really nice job. I myself don't have any winter riding gear because I only get to ride in the spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
Got some gerbings for a steal price via ebay 2 or 3 years ago. Only the gloves (2 pairs, one for me and one for wifey). Bought them for riding the ATV in winter at that time. had to buy two separate controller from a different seller - also for a really good price. Still have both glove pairs, still love them.

Totally satisfied, would buy them again, but dont know anything about the actual quality.



Cu,
Sven
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top