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Love my 2010 Nomad except for the HEAT!! Has anyone come up with any answers for a little cool down? My cooling fan seems to run all the time. :confused:
 

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Engine Ice coolant:)
 

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My two cents....I have a 2010 nomad and just finished a 200 mile ride in 93 degree temps and i was totally comfortable. Never had a hint of heat in either stop n go traffic or highway.

That said, i took this ride with 3 guys (all on ultra classics.) I could not sit next to them at the light without their machines blistering my leg.

Is it me or is it particular machines??
 

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Reality

My additional 2 cents, for what it's worth, anyway. People tend to forget you're sitting on top and straddling a 104 cubic inch (1.7 liter) engine and there are cars that don't have an engine with that displacement (and just picture how big the smallest car radiator is). My Nomad (as well as all 1700's) has liquid cooled heads and air cooled jugs. So at a stoplight or in stop-n-go traffic, you will feel the heat radiating off of the jugs and fan blowing more heat from the radiator onto your legs. There's neither a seperate compartment for the engine nor heat shields between you and the jugs/heads. Without watercooling the whole engine and covering the whole thing in a fairing that directs the heat away from rider and passenger; I'm not sure what else could be done. And I bought the Nomad for the look, feel and sound of a V-Twin which all that additional equipment/bodywork would screw up. My 900 didn't seem nearly as hot, but it was only about half the displacement, too. You did feel the heat; especially when the fan kicked in. But I don't believe the 1700 puts out as much heat as my buddies 1200 Sportster (which is air and "oil" cooled). I can't say what other big displacement V-Twins from Star, Suzuki or Honda are like as far as heat goes either; I only know what my Nomad is like and 900 was like. Someone else could chime in on those. I will say that my brother-in-law complains about how hot his Goldwing can be; so it isn't just the Kawi 1700's that get hot. As stated above, you can drop the engine and coolant temp a few degrees with products such as Engine Ice coolant or WaterWetter coolant additive. But the truth is, to generate the power you're going to generate heat. And the more power, the more heat that will be generated. It's not bad at all as long as you're moving, right?
 

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These 1700 motors are just heat machines IMHO. I have changed to synthetic oil and it helped some. Anytime its over 90 I just bake going through town. That fan comes on and it just gets nasty.
 

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My Nomad (as well as all 1700's) has liquid cooled heads and air cooled jugs.
All true. Yet, my 1500FI Classic had all the same features with only 200cc smaller displacement and managed to "feel" much cooler in exactly the same environment and conditions as my new Nomad 1700. The fan on my 1500 rarely came on, and never at highway speeds. However, the 1700's fan runs very frequently, even over 55MPH + 20MPH headwind.

I can't blame the engine size, I don't think 200cc difference is enough to explain throwing this much heat and 13MPG lower mileage than the 1500.

All things considered though I'm liking my Nomad. Just sayin' :)
 

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i think these are just warm engines i've only had a 900 and now a 1700 and its nothing more than i expect sittling on an engine rolling thru town in stop and go situations these exhaust systens also have cat convertors which generate heat in order to work so thats another plus for the heat as far a the feel with the fans on your blowing warm air over a rad containing 200 deg water past a cylinder jug thats prob over 200 deg itself right onto your legs and up your body ... as a tech for autos i will say open the hood on any newer car thats been sitting idling thru town and youll have the same result its hot hot hot worse than what i feel on my bike 90% of the time
 

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Big engine, little radiator and a lean fuel map all lead to a hot engine. Some claim to have found relief by installing aftermarket mufflers, aftermarket air intake and a fuel processor.
 

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Here in TX, the VV 1700s engine gets quite hot. I went to Ohio to visit my parents and the outside temps were in the mid 70s. The VV 1700s engine didn't get hot. Once these darn high temps down here go away, the bike will more enjoyable to ride.
 

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I have noticed that my legs get very hot with just blue jeans on my legs (inner thighs). When I wear leather chaps my legs feel about 30 degrees cooler
 

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My additional 2 cents, for what it's worth, anyway. People tend to forget you're sitting on top and straddling a 104 cubic inch (1.7 liter) engine and there are cars that don't have an engine with that displacement (and just picture how big the smallest car radiator is). My Nomad (as well as all 1700's) has liquid cooled heads and air cooled jugs. So at a stoplight or in stop-n-go traffic, you will feel the heat radiating off of the jugs and fan blowing more heat from the radiator onto your legs. There's neither a seperate compartment for the engine nor heat shields between you and the jugs/heads. Without watercooling the whole engine and covering the whole thing in a fairing that directs the heat away from rider and passenger; I'm not sure what else could be done. And I bought the Nomad for the look, feel and sound of a V-Twin which all that additional equipment/bodywork would screw up. My 900 didn't seem nearly as hot, but it was only about half the displacement, too. You did feel the heat; especially when the fan kicked in. But I don't believe the 1700 puts out as much heat as my buddies 1200 Sportster (which is air and "oil" cooled). I can't say what other big displacement V-Twins from Star, Suzuki or Honda are like as far as heat goes either; I only know what my Nomad is like and 900 was like. Someone else could chime in on those. I will say that my brother-in-law complains about how hot his Goldwing can be; so it isn't just the Kawi 1700's that get hot. As stated above, you can drop the engine and coolant temp a few degrees with products such as Engine Ice coolant or WaterWetter coolant additive. But the truth is, to generate the power you're going to generate heat. And the more power, the more heat that will be generated. It's not bad at all as long as you're moving, right?
You are 100% right as I own the same bike as you. You have good taste...lol Now I have thrown out this idea but no one has ever answered as whether they think it will work or hurt the motor, So I will try again.

With the nomad if you put your hand near the bottom front of the bike on the right side when the fan comes on you don't feel it that bad. Now when you put your hand in the same spot on the left side in blows and feels like an oven. Plus this is hitting the air filter directly which gets blistering hot. The only difference I see between the two sides is the exhaust heat shield on the right is diverting the air down and under the bike. Would it make sense to have a shield made up for the left side to do the same? Would it make the bike run any hotter? Or would it help solve the problem for the rider? I find the bike is sluggish when it gets real hot in stop and go traffic. When it cools down some it's back to normal.

What is does anyone think about this idea? Does it work or am I just blowing hot air? Pardon the pun...lol
 

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+1 to wbilotta on the aftermarket stuff. Here's what I can think of that would help.

1. The 'big 3' is a good start. I did that on my 1700 classic and it helped a little. These bikes are so restricted stock you gotta let them breath! intake, exhaust and a fuel processor helps.
2. I also noticed the intake uses air from between the cylinders and runs it through the filter on the left side of the bike. Then after it filters that air it runs it back between the cylinders to the right side where it enters the engine. That's hot air being run through a hot engine twice! Take that whole assembly out and install an air intake kit that takes fresh ambient ram air like the Tornado Air kit from Thunder. It will not only reduce engine heat but also increase engine power a little (http://www.thundermfg.com/store/index.php?l=product_detail&p=364)
3. Finally, I have been looking into getting rid of the pair valve/reed valve contraption they install on most bikes. There is a hole on the right side if you take of the chrome cover that takes filtered air and mixes it with exhaust. Basically it helps add oxygen to the exhaust and burns off stuff in the exhaust before it exits the pipe. This is what causes the 'popping' sound which sometimes is so loud it sounds like a whip. This is actually small explosions happening in your exhaust pipe which causes a lot of heat and can potentially cause your pipe to blue. Some people 'marble' the hose so it just doesn't take in air which is the easy fix, but I would prefer to take the hoses and everything off if I can figure it out. They don't make block of plates for the 1700 that I can find yet. Either way, this would reduce some heat down there as well (it doesn't change engine performance either way).
 

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You are 100% right as I own the same bike as you. You have good taste...lol Now I have thrown out this idea but no one has ever answered as whether they think it will work or hurt the motor, So I will try again.

With the nomad if you put your hand near the bottom front of the bike on the right side when the fan comes on you don't feel it that bad. Now when you put your hand in the same spot on the left side in blows and feels like an oven. Plus this is hitting the air filter directly which gets blistering hot. The only difference I see between the two sides is the exhaust heat shield on the right is diverting the air down and under the bike. Would it make sense to have a shield made up for the left side to do the same? Would it make the bike run any hotter? Or would it help solve the problem for the rider? I find the bike is sluggish when it gets real hot in stop and go traffic. When it cools down some it's back to normal.

What is does anyone think about this idea? Does it work or am I just blowing hot air? Pardon the pun...lol
i dont think it would make the bike run any hotter. the fan is to cool the water going through the radiator, not to blow air on the engine. so as long as you dont interfere with the air hitting the radiator, it might help. oh, and my bike runs like crap when the temp gets up to the mark where the fan comes on, and stays running like crap until the temp is back below that mark. the symptoms are, hesitation , popping and backfiring. its like a totally different bike once that temp drops. I've also got the cobra tri ovals and cobra fi2000r. i thought that helped with the temp but i recently took off just the fi2000r and not a change in performance or temp, what a piece of sh%#
 

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i dont think it would make the bike run any hotter. the fan is to cool the water going through the radiator, not to blow air on the engine. so as long as you dont interfere with the air hitting the radiator, it might help. oh, and my bike runs like crap when the temp gets up to the mark where the fan comes on, and stays running like crap until the temp is back below that mark. the symptoms are, hesitation , popping and backfiring. its like a totally different bike once that temp drops. I've also got the cobra tri ovals and cobra fi2000r. i thought that helped with the temp but i recently took off just the fi2000r and not a change in performance or temp, what a piece of sh%#
I'm glad it's not just me. I have a cobra powr pro on order, I hope it works better than the reg FI 2000. The shroud I was thinking of would be something similar to the exhaust shield on the right side. I get a lot more hot air from the left side when the fan kicks on. What puzzles me is why kawi has the air blowing right on the air filter. That cover gets burning hot, then they move the air between the jugs and it gets hotter before getting into the motor???? This just doesn't make any sense. Motors like cool air going into them.
 

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I'm glad it's not just me. I have a cobra powr pro on order, I hope it works better than the reg FI 2000. The shroud I was thinking of would be something similar to the exhaust shield on the right side. I get a lot more hot air from the left side when the fan kicks on. What puzzles me is why kawi has the air blowing right on the air filter. That cover gets burning hot, then they move the air between the jugs and it gets hotter before getting into the motor???? This just doesn't make any sense. Motors like cool air going into them.
In order to minimize the intake noise Kawasaki put the air filter on the left side and pulled the air through the tunnel. If you install an aftermarket intake such as a Thunder Mfg. kit you will hear what I'm talking about.

I agree it doesn't make sense from an engineering standpoint to pull hot air from between the jugs, route it from the left side to the right via four 90 degree bends and into the throttle body but it does make the bike quieter. My intake is loudest right around 2800-3000 rpms.
 

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In order to minimize the intake noise Kawasaki put the air filter on the left side and pulled the air through the tunnel. If you install an aftermarket intake such as a Thunder Mfg. kit you will hear what I'm talking about.

I agree it doesn't make sense from an engineering standpoint to pull hot air from between the jugs, route it from the left side to the right via four 90 degree bends and into the throttle body but it does make the bike quieter. My intake is loudest right around 2800-3000 rpms.
I bet it sounds pretty dam good too. That seems to be right around cruising speed on the highway.
 

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Ponch had a good idea last year about modifying one of the saddlebags to become a radiator exhaust. I've thought about that now and again and I believe that it would work excellent if engineered properly. Basically remove the front radiator (which would allow much greater flow of air on the cylinders), pipe the coolant to a modified radiator that would either sit below a shortened saddlebag or replace the entire bag. All that heat would go behind you like the exhaust is doing now. I would have gladly given up one of my saddlebags to escape the brutial heat that I experienced while riding across Texas this past July. Add this to my brothers idea of placing a waterbag on top of dry ice in the other saddlebag with an electric aquarium pump that goes to a misting device on your handlebars. Woo Hoo! bring on the heat!
 

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Ponch had a good idea last year about modifying one of the saddlebags to become a radiator exhaust. I've thought about that now and again and I believe that it would work excellent if engineered properly. Basically remove the front radiator (which would allow much greater flow of air on the cylinders), pipe the coolant to a modified radiator that would either sit below a shortened saddlebag or replace the entire bag. All that heat would go behind you like the exhaust is doing now. I would have gladly given up one of my saddlebags to escape the brutial heat that I experienced while riding across Texas this past July. Add this to my brothers idea of placing a waterbag on top of dry ice in the other saddlebag with an electric aquarium pump that goes to a misting device on your handlebars. Woo Hoo! bring on the heat!
As much as I would love to find a way to mitigate the heat I feel there's no way I'm giving up a saddle bag to do so.
 
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