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Discussion Starter #1
I am the owner of a 2009 Classic LT and have noticed over the past few weeks the headlight will sometimes turn off usually at very inconvenient times such as night time on a country road, or not come on at all. I went through all of the usual suspects such as fuse, cracked wire, bulb but nothing could I find. I changed the fuse and the bulb just in case only to find no light at all. I removed the wiring out of the headlight shell to give it a good going over and found it was all good. I also pulled apart the dimmer switch and cleaned it and when it was assembled I had lights, but now this morning after putting everything back to together again nothing. I used a test light and I have power to the switch and the headlight connector but the test light also lights up when I touch the probe to the switch body and in fact any metal part of the bike. Is this normal? I am a complete babe in the woods when it comes to electrical stuff and I tell ya it is driving me mad. All the wires are still well insulated with no worn wires that I can see. Anyone got any ideas as I will not ride the bike without a working headlight. Oh and all the other lights work as expected as does the horn. I am thinking it maybe the switch and will pull it apart again and have a look with a magnifying glass. Any assistance would be most appreciated.

Cheers and Beers.

Bob
 

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BOTM Winner, October 2016
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537 Posts
Did you check your battery connections to be tight. The test light on any part of the frame lighting up isn't right. You may have a loose ground somewhere.

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Discussion Starter #5
I finally sorted the problem but I am not sure how. I checked and cleaned every terminal, the bulb, fuses and anything else I could think of. I still believe it was the switch, and if you have ever pulled one apart you will know what I mean. The dimmer switch on a V2K is essentially an over engineered item when a simple rocker switch would have sufficed. When assembled it relies wholly on a plastic pin pressing against the body of the switch to maintain the electrical contact. Oh and do not ever lose the tiny ball bearing as nothing will work without it. So in the end it all worked out and I once again have my knees in the breeze.

Cheers and Beers.

Bob
 
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