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How do you tackle a gravel road if you have to be on one for a small stint. Decent speed or really slow? I road on one the other night for about 300 yards and I went real slow, but the bike was really unstable. Would it have been better if I would have taken it a little faster?
 

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Street bikes and their street tires like paved streets. If you have to ride on dirt (gravel) roads, drive at a speed that YOU feel comfortable with. Loose gravel is going to be unstable, so you're wise not taking it too fast.
 

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Just got back from a long trip, along the way we encountered more than our share of roadwork in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Gravel, dirt and a mixture of both at various speeds, but found that about 25 - 30 seemed to work well, no sudden starts, stops or turns, everything smooth movements. With the skinny fromt tire on the Custom it was extra 'fun' in 2" deep loose gravel on top of asphalt for 10 miles, but made it through all of it ok.
 

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I "currently" live in Southern California, and in a rural community. I live 4 miles on a dirt road, from the paved road. Some sand, and very scary if you make any sudden moves.

Like Richard Kerr stated "25-30 mph", and be very aware of the front tire.
 

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Yup, I have about 500 ft gravel driveway (never had that in Cali) and definitely take it easy. Feels like driving on a metal plate bridge. Of course, I am getting more comfy with it, so do what feels comfortable to you, just not too fast, because it is like driving on marbles when you stop aggresively.
 

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slow... better late than down.
 

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The one HUGE difference in cruiser riding is the inability to stand up on the bike. At least I've been unable to determine a way as of yet.
Blasting through dirt roads while standing on the pegs is usually the way to go, I used to stand while bombing over railroad tracks too......
 

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Try to find a track where car tires have pushed the loose stuff away. I live 6 miles from the pavement, and can usually find a hard track on my gravel road. Because the road can be uneven it can pull the bike around a bit and the key is to never overcorrect. Take it slow and steady and make gentle corrections. Going too slow can sometimes be worse in that situation. I usually go 35-45 mph on a hard track and 25-30 if I'm in loose gravel. My 900 handles great on the hard track, a little more wiggly in the 2" deep sand.
 

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To slow on loose dirt and the front tire can dig in, a little faster and it'll scoot over the top BUT in general drive slower than on pavement and realize you're not going to have a come to a controlled stop as fast as on pavement. Uncontrolled you may actually stop quicker, just depends on how well you bounce.
 

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I think when I had Metzelers on my old bike going down gravel was a whole lot less scary. They did a better job of handling it.
 

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I have to agree. 20-30 is good in most cases. The hills with fresh gravel dropped are what always get me. I have 5 miles of gravel out with steep hills and water crossing. The bike does great. On the hills I stay in second and let the engine do the work instead of braking. When there is fresh gravel on the hill though, take another way. I have set mine down twice due to that. Yesterday was the second time. I did not know there was fresh gravel down till I was already heading down the hill. Then there was no way to stop so I laid it down and stopped it. Better to lay it down while you can still retain control than to slide into real danger. I got a scratch on my rear turn signal but that was it. Just be careful!
 
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