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Discussion Starter #1
the last bike i owned was 74 honda 350. it was only 3 yrs old when i had it.
i then joined the army in a unit that left little time to buy a bike let alone ride it. i recently retired and am looking to get back into riding. i took the safety course which up here is 3 days 6 hrs a day riding plus lectures. i'm looking at buying an 06 1500 vulcan classic. i am 6 ft tall and not easily intimidated. is it a good idea to go with this bike with no experience riding a large bike?
 

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I see no problem with it, especially as you don't appear intimidated by it.

As a kid I grew up riding dirt bikes, and bought my first street bike at 18 (Honda CX500). Traded that bike for a Honda Nighthawk 700S, which I sold in 1986. I owned no bikes until 2011. During the time of not owning a bike, I probably "took a spin" on half a dozen bikes.

So in spring of 2011 bought a Vulcan 1500 Classic and decided in the fall to upgrade to the Vaquero.

As long as the bike isn't too heavy for you to handle, and you are easy on the throttle until you go through the learning curve, I say go for it.
 

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I believe you can start on almost any bike provided you can easily flat foot it, and you're not the type of person who pushes past their own limits. If you're willing to take it slow and easy and spend a lot of time in a parking lot I see no problems.

Truth be told, the only time the weight of the bigger bike is going to be an issue is at real low speeds, so watch your footing and try to remember to stop straight and in a flat spot, at speed it'll be just as nimble as anything, once you get the hang of it. The only other issue is the power, that's more of an issue with people thinking supersport bikes are good first bikes (these 1000cc sportbikes that they'll run up to 10,000 RPMs and drop the clutch, they're still in the same spot, but the bike is 300 yard away LOL)

You'll be fine. Enjoy! I'd recommend putting some highway bars on it though. It's not all that uncommon to drop your first (or first in a while) bike practicing in a parking lot or at low speeds or something. Better to scratch up some cheap chrome crash bars than to do damage to your bike!
 

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the last bike i owned was 74 honda 350. it was only 3 yrs old when i had it.
i then joined the army in a unit that left little time to buy a bike let alone ride it. i recently retired and am looking to get back into riding. i took the safety course which up here is 3 days 6 hrs a day riding plus lectures. i'm looking at buying an 06 1500 vulcan classic. i am 6 ft tall and not easily intimidated. is it a good idea to go with this bike with no experience riding a large bike?
My 1st bike at 63 years old was 2008 suk c109rt (900 lbs +) and had no problems. Yes i had to learn from the very beginning and only dropped a couple (maybe 3) times, one of those was i forgot to put down....yes..... the kickstand. Loose sand was the next time.
 

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My last bike was a kz400 back in the early 90's. Just bought a 1500 classic back in feb. and have no problems handling the big bike. Just rode 220 miles last weekend with no problems. Just take your time and don't let others push you past your comfort level.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
good idea-bad idea

the last bike i owned was 74 honda 350. it was only 3 yrs old when i had it.
i then joined the army in a unit that left little time to buy a bike let alone ride it. i recently retired and am looking to get back into riding. i took the safety course which up here is 3 days 6 hrs a day riding plus lectures. i'm looking at buying an 06 1500 vulcan classic. i am 6 ft tall and not easily intimidated. is it a good idea to go with this bike with no experience riding a large bike?
Dellema solved I bought the 1500 today.
Thank you to those who inputted.(if that's even a real word)
 

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Congrats on the new bike. I dropped mine the day I brought it home but thanks to the crash bars nothing was damaged. I got used to the weight quick enough and i'm sure you will too. 01 1500 Classic
 

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Thanks for the confidance build!:rolleyes: Mine made it through the test drive, off the trailer, and up my drive. Foot got stuck under the brake pedal but did not drop drop it thanks to RicDaRulas advice :if you get in trouble disengage the clutch. Will stay in shed until crash I mean highway bars come in.
 

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Good Luck with it Dude!
 

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Thanks for the confidance build!:rolleyes: Mine made it through the test drive, off the trailer, and up my drive. Foot got stuck under the brake pedal but did not drop drop it thanks to RicDaRulas advice :if you get in trouble disengage the clutch. Will stay in shed until crash I mean highway bars come in.

Jig, If you have the time and weather Just go for a ride ! you don't have to or want to leave your comfort zone, but find a nice, less traveled road and take a leisurely putt !
 

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Congrats on your bike. The 1500s are pretty nibble if you ask me, but I used to have an older 1500 Goldwing that was not nibble so it's perspective. Check out some videos on youtube on how to pick it up in case you drop it. Take it easy and ride safe. You will love that bike. I love mine. The only way to gain experience is to ride. There are some great folks around here so ask questions when you have them.
 

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the last bike i owned was 74 honda 350. it was only 3 yrs old when i had it.
i then joined the army in a unit that left little time to buy a bike let alone ride it. i recently retired and am looking to get back into riding. i took the safety course which up here is 3 days 6 hrs a day riding plus lectures. i'm looking at buying an 06 1500 vulcan classic. i am 6 ft tall and not easily intimidated. is it a good idea to go with this bike with no experience riding a large bike?
I was in kind of the same position as you both agewise and experience wise when I bought a 900 classic a few months ago. I was afraid of the weight etc. In retro spect I now realize I could have easily started on something bigger. Just listen to what others on this thread have told you and just be sensible. I just completed the safety course after about two months of experience riding and learned a ton. Good luck.....
 

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I've only been riding for a year now, but I wanted to learn the right way and live to see my SECOND bike, so I opted for Kawi's mini cruiser. :eek:

However, while asking around about what bike would be good for me to start on, I was told that because of my size (6'4", 205lb), anything less than a 1L cruiser would be acceptable as long as I was comfortable on it. Yes, cruiser, not sportbike.

When I went to the dealer to look at bikes, the salesman even told me "If you had at least a year of experience, I'd try to get you on that VN900 sitting over there" (it was the prettiest thing in the showroom :D). Of course, he didn't know me personally, so he could only judge my skills by my size and experience.

I decided on the 500, but a part of me wishes I would have at least sat on the 9. Common sense keeps telling me that it's better to start small. Everything that everyone else is posting I agree with, I just wanted to share my experiences on this subject.

Have fun and keep it rubber side down! :D
 

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Welcome to the vulcan collective, ride long and faster,LOL
 

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I've only been riding for a year now, but I wanted to learn the right way and live to see my SECOND bike, so I opted for Kawi's mini cruiser. :eek:

However, while asking around about what bike would be good for me to start on, I was told that because of my size (6'4", 205lb), anything less than a 1L cruiser would be acceptable as long as I was comfortable on it. Yes, cruiser, not sportbike.

When I went to the dealer to look at bikes, the salesman even told me "If you had at least a year of experience, I'd try to get you on that VN900 sitting over there" (it was the prettiest thing in the showroom :D). Of course, he didn't know me personally, so he could only judge my skills by my size and experience.

I decided on the 500, but a part of me wishes I would have at least sat on the 9. Common sense keeps telling me that it's better to start small. Everything that everyone else is posting I agree with, I just wanted to share my experiences on this subject.

Have fun and keep it rubber side down! :D
Not to throw salt in the wound but my 900 was my first bike :D

The thing is to take it slow. The first two months were spent in a parking lot. But now, I appreciate the low center of gravity that makes it SUPER easy to ride.

I've found it's actually easier to ride than some smaller cruisers I've ridden. There's more to the equation than displacement. Power isn't an issue either. It's got plenty, but not too much for a bigger, in my opinion.

In other words, enjoy that 500! But when you're ready to move up, don't worry about the 900, I think you'll be surprised how easy it is to ride!
 

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Not to throw salt in the wound but my 900 was my first bike :D

The thing is to take it slow. The first two months were spent in a parking lot. But now, I appreciate the low center of gravity that makes it SUPER easy to ride.

I've found it's actually easier to ride than some smaller cruisers I've ridden. There's more to the equation than displacement. Power isn't an issue either. It's got plenty, but not too much for a bigger, in my opinion.

In other words, enjoy that 500! But when you're ready to move up, don't worry about the 900, I think you'll be surprised how easy it is to ride!
I think I picked up on it pretty quick, I was on county roads in the first week. ;)

I'll agree that it's more complicated than weight and displacement. COG and wheelbase come into play, as well as gearing, seat height (and width), fork angle... the list goes on! I do wish I had more legroom, but I'll be picking up some offset pegs for 500rider's highway bars here soon. :D

I plan on riding the 500 for at least two or three years, and who knows? I may have a greater appreciation for it down the road. If not, my next step will probably be the 9.

P.S. I have dreams about the 900 custom in orange with the powdercoated pipes. :eek:
 

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A honda rebel was my first cruiser, at the time i was 6-5 about 190, i went down on it because it was so small, had some freak accident, feet were to big for the back break(never used the front break before taking a msf class, guy who taught me to ride said ir caused you to go down), so i locked up the front one and down i went. I think first bike is relative, they are all two wheels and an engine ans can throw your ass, so long as a new rider doesnt get a busa or goldwing, i thing you adapt to anything else
 

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feet were to big for the back break

I think first bike is relative, they are all two wheels and an engine ans can throw your ass, so long as a new rider doesnt get a busa or goldwing, i thing you adapt to anything else
Mine are a little too big on the 500. I adjusted some of the play out of it and now it's fine.

I guess I can agree with that last part.
 

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I think I picked up on it pretty quick, I was on county roads in the first week. ;)

I'll agree that it's more complicated than weight and displacement. COG and wheelbase come into play, as well as gearing, seat height (and width), fork angle... the list goes on! I do wish I had more legroom, but I'll be picking up some offset pegs for 500rider's highway bars here soon. :D

I plan on riding the 500 for at least two or three years, and who knows? I may have a greater appreciation for it down the road. If not, my next step will probably be the 9.

P.S. I have dreams about the 900 custom in orange with the powdercoated pipes. :eek:


Yeah I rode 55mph on a county road the week after I bought it, but I noticed I wasn't confident in my braking abilities and a thought came over 'what if someone pulls out... what do I do'. Not a good thought to have when you're rolling down the road :D

I had training in the MSF, but it was a confidence thing. Once I had the confidence to brake hard, locked it up a few times to know what it felt like, I was out on the road, on the interstate and two up and never looking back :D

Even got to find out (on that exact same road I first rode on) what it was like when a truck hopped into my lane head on. Wooho, that was fun, hehe.

It's all about riding what you enjoy. Why ride anything else?
 
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