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I took my new to me 2016 voyager for it's first long trip this weekend and found the gas gauge and especially the miles to empty is terribly wrong. I found some posts dating back to 2012 about the miles to empty jumping all over the place rendering it useless but is that still true for the newer models? Do i have a problem or is that just the way it works? So with the miles to empty not working i started to look at the gas gauge and found that to be also very bad. First of all it's divided into 6 lines so theirs no real 1/4 tank or 1/8 tank mark that i'm used to seeing so 1/6 mark is 3-1/2 quarts but when filling up at that point i had about 2 gallons left in the tank. It was so bad that i let it run until it started flashing to get gas and found that to have 1-1/2 gallons still in the tank. Is this what the majority have found?
 

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The fuel gauge is only accurate when the bike is sitting straight up. Same goes for the miles till empty.
 

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Best do a long run, with a spare tank in the saddlebag, 2 gals or so, and let that gas gauge dip way below E. if you can’t let it go dry, toss in the 2 gal and then fill up at next stop.
I figured to do about 300kms max per tank. 1/2 way on gas gauge is about 150kms. The range and consumption rates change too much to be accurate.
YMMV ?
 

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It's just the way they are. Do what most people do and just zero the odometer at each fill and just go by that. I can consistently travel about 320 km/tank. That's about 200 US miles. The light comes on quite a bit before that but I just ignore it.
 

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I simply zero the trip meter when the low fuel warning starts that irritating flashing thing, since I know for sure I have at least 50km from that point. Changing over to the trip meter also stops the display doing that irritating flashing thing, so it's win / win.
 

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Thanks for this info. Great to know.

I simply zero the trip meter when the low fuel warning starts that irritating flashing thing, since I know for sure I have at least 50km from that point. Changing over to the trip meter also stops the display doing that irritating flashing thing, so it's win / win.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the reply's, so no need to go back to the dealer for warranty work it's just that way as i suspected from past postings. That's to bad for a modern bike to work this way it was one of the features that i really wanted in a new bike i remember way back in 1973 when i started riding using the trip meter for a gas gauge. I do have over a gallon when the low fuel starts flashing but i don't like being surprised like that.
 

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For us who own 900's, we've modded the fuel gauge by adding around 250 ohm's to the fuel circuit. Works like a charm on correcting the poor fuel gauge. Check it out here: gas gauge fix. Hope it helps.
 

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Just an FYI... pushing the trip selector switch once to the right and once to the left will clear the flashing low fuel warning screens and return you to your trip meter and average milage screens, only leaving the low fuel light on.

And though I haven't researched it, I'm sure disabling the fuel gauge/low fuel warning, wouldn't be that difficult.
 

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If you consider the swoopy, curvy geometry of most motorcycle tanks vs. the flat box geometry of an automobile fuel tank, it's really a miracle any of our gauges are even vaguely accurate. They're trying to give you the volume of a very complex shape by measuring a single dimension (the height) of that shape. It's mathematically impossible for that system to work -- ya can't get there from here!

Goldwings are fairly accurate, mostly because their (hidden) fuel tank is a lot closer to a box shape.

For the rest of us -- well, that's a nice shiny doodad on the dashboard, but trip meters are the real fuel gauge. If the manufacturers wanted to, the fuel injection system could, I imagine, provide a rather precise readout of "fuel burned" -- that's what we had on semis when I was driving.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Trainermb i rented an Indian roadmaster last month and put 900 plus miles on it and the miles to empty didn't jump all over the place like the voyager and i should think the Harley's also don't have this problem and as you mentioned the goldwings also figured it out. It looks like Kaw just dosen't want to make a quality unit but then the bike is also 10 thousand less than those others so i guess you get what you pay for. Some things bother some people and not so much others, this is one of those things for me it really irritates me.
 

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Trainermb i rented an Indian roadmaster last month and put 900 plus miles on it and the miles to empty didn't jump all over the place like the voyager and i should think the Harley's also don't have this problem and as you mentioned the goldwings also figured it out. It looks like Kaw just dosen't want to make a quality unit but then the bike is also 10 thousand less than those others so i guess you get what you pay for. Some things bother some people and not so much others, this is one of those things for me it really irritates me.
Hmmm. That stability is typically created by the not-very-high-tech solution of connecting a five-cent capacitor across the fuel level sender. I can't even imagine designing a fuel gauge circuit without one. Doesn't make it any more accurate, but does smooth out the reading. That's weird that it jumps around so much. Is it calculating MPG and factoring that against fuel level or something? Sounds like poor programming of a device, if that's the case, rather than poor mechanical or electrical parts. The enjunearin' way of putting it is "there should be more hysteresis in that system." In English, the damn thing should think longer before making a decision.

It does sound annoying, and I'm definitely in the club with you on "the *&$! thing should work right!" (I'm assiduously avoiding thinking about how much time and money I've spent in my life on that particular --- uhhhh -- commitment to excellence?)

I guess it's kind of like medicine -- the last thing you want a doctor to say is, "Hmmm ... interesting."
 

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The digital display for average fuel consumption starts high, and by the end of riding season it gets stuck at a low number like 5.8L/100kms. That sounds nice, but it’s not what the manual record result is.
The stereo system is really useless except when the engine is off.
 

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The Voyager is only the 2nd vehicle I have ever had with a distance to empty display. The other was my wife's 1988 LeBaron. I used to get a kick out of watching the distance to empty peg at 999 miles and the mpg at 400 when coming down a steep mountain. I have never seen more than 750 miles to empty and 250 mpg on the Voyager in the same mountains, so it is MUCH more accurate! :grin2:

All seriousness aside, floats for gas gauges can get stuck. Depending on the distance to empty or even the gas gauge to know when to fill up could get you stranded in the middle of nowhere. I do use the DTE and watch the gas gauge, but I also always set one trip meter when I fill up so I know how far I have gone on the current tank. I keep that trip meter displayed at all times.
 

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On my 900 I had to remove the tank for some repairs, so while I had the fuel sending unit out I bent the float rod down slightly. It made the gauge on it almost perfect. I guess I got lucky on how much I bent it.
On the Voyager I know how far I can go after the light comes on so I don't get worried about running out, but I fill up as soon as I can. I'm still going farther on a tank than most of the people I ride with. If I fill up when they do, I never see the fuel warning light.
 

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Myself, on my 2016 voyager when fuel light comes on I have found that it has 1.5 gal. left in the tank. In the past on previously owned bikes I have pushed it to the limit and wound up walking after running out of gas. Now when the fuel light comes on I stop at the next gas station I come to and fill up because walking sucks.
 

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Same thing happens with my 2011 Voyager. At each fill I zero out one trip odometer. Fuel display starts flashing around 135 miles. At that point I have about 1 gallon left in tank. I get about 176 miles per tank
 

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My light comes on anywhere from 135-155 miles depending on where most of the fuel was used, where and how I was riding. If I fill up as soon as it comes on, it takes about 4.1-4.4 gallons of gas to refill. They may have designed it this way for a couple reasons. 1) so you dont get stranded pushing a heavy bike to the next pumps, 2) with the in tank electric pump, the fuel helps keep the pump from getting hot thus prolonging its life. The miles to empty is like an instant reading, add a slight bit of throttle and it drops, back off and it raises.
 
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