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Yeah, I know that, but I don't really care where the needle ends up. It's always in the same spot when I fill the tank anyway and I know I still have a 1 gallon cushion in the tank at 200 miles.......no worries.
 

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I know this is an old thread but I just got my bike and hope to fix the gauge too!
Being OCD I bought the suggested Radio Shack variable resistor # 271-0342
It looks different that then rounded ones shown in the previous posts and pix.

A few of ?'s
1. Which 2 of the 3 prongs need to be inserted into the blk/wht wire and wht/yel ends?
2. The adjustment screw has no numbers. How do I know where 260 260 ohms is to get into range of where I need to be?

Also, I know the light is an entirely different fix but is there any place to adjust that as well? Mine seems to come on randomly!

Many thanks
 

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I know this is an old thread but I just got my bike and hope to fix the gauge too!
Being OCD I bought the suggested Radio Shack variable resistor # 271-0342
It looks different that then rounded ones shown in the previous posts and pix.

A few of ?'s
1. Which 2 of the 3 prongs need to be inserted into the blk/wht wire and wht/yel ends?
2. The adjustment screw has no numbers. How do I know where 260 260 ohms is to get into range of where I need to be?

Also, I know the light is an entirely different fix but is there any place to adjust that as well? Mine seems to come on randomly!

Many thanks
Where in the world did you find an open Radio Shack????!?!

Okay ... assuming you have room under there for that thing ....and fair warning, you may be headed down a rabbit hole....

1) The center tap and either one of the two outside taps. If you connect it to one tap, resistance goes up as you turn to the right, if you connect to the other, resistance goes up as you turn to the left. One way or the other, it's a variable resistor. If you connect to both outside taps (with no connection to the middle one) you just get the full value of the resistor.

2) Ohm meter. Measure before connecting it into the circuit. If you measure after you connect it in, my ballpark estimate, based on absolutely nothing but guesswork and an excessive devotion to Ohm's Law, would be you should see around 46 ohms across the new resistor when it is in the circuit. That's presuming the fuel sensor is a 0 - 100 ohm potentiometer and the middle should be a little lower than ~50. But let us know what actually works.

I hope you got a 0 - 500 ohm variable resistor ... anything higher is going to be a beast to get set where you want it, and be out of adjustment after you hit a few bumps. There is nothing magic nor right about the 260 ohm figure. It will depend on your particular fuel sensor's resistance and, to a lesser extent, the resistance of the fuel gauge. Believe me, neither was made to any sort of precision resistance specification.

I'll tag on these schematics I made for another thread. The first shows what you have now, the second what you are trying to accomplish, electrically speaking.
 

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Went to RShack last week in Kerrville TX....no resistors and it turned out their be their LAST DAY.

Type in Radio Shack and the part number on ebay and you can buy these still. I did and it shipped by USPS almost as fast as your response!

I lack a ohm meter or knowledge to understand those schematics. Have a little over half a tank of gas (which is near as hard to find as a Radio Shack these days!). Tomorrow, I'll connect the center prong and one of the prongs see what happens. Will fool with the dial and continue to watch.

I might be able to do so good but more importantly : Can I do any harm...i.e. short anything out? Permanently disable the gas gauge or anything else?
 

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...Can I do any harm...i.e. short anything out? Permanently disable the gas gauge or anything else?
Oh, heck yeah. Not with the resistor wired in properly, but during the wiring you have all sorts of chances to make sparks. I wouldn't turn the resistor down to zero ...that would be a short circuit, and why I haven't thought variable resistors for this application were such a grand idea.

Maybe disconnect the battery while you're in there, and be sure to insulate those connections from each other and the bike.

The 2nd schematic shows a resistor (zig-zag thing) connected between the lead to the fuel gauge and ground (the triangular lines symbol.) That's just shorthand for "all these connections to this symbol are connected together electrically.) Down at the bottom it shows the fuel sensor as a variable resistor (the zig-zag thing with the arrow through it.)

Multimeters are usually about $5 at Harbor Fright. They're surprisingly good considering the price, so long as you weren't planning to do any high-precision work with it. The little red one they sell even has a battery tester on it so you can tell if you really need to trash those AA's. Not hard to work. Red plug goes in red "V Ω mA" socket, black plug goes in black socket, set dial to 2000 Ω (that's the symbol for ohms), put probes where you plan to connect wires. Turn on, read meter. Nothin' to it. Impress your friends!

eta: Dang it. I'm used to using that program where I draw schematics for print applications ....forgot it crops the image. No wonder you can't read it. Here's a corrected one.
 

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Also, I know the light is an entirely different fix but is there any place to adjust that as well? Mine seems to come on randomly!

Many thanks
I think you might find the fuel light is a mechanical switch so you may need to adjust it from with in the fuel tank.

I'm not 100% on this so you may need to look at how the light actually works.
 

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Think you've covered every nock and crannie trainermb ? I will give it a go next time I have some time off work thanks for all your help bud I'll post how it's goes ( hopefully no ).


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Hi

Oh well, im the "Lets just do it" kind of guy.

Took the instrument off of the bike today, unplugged the fuel sender connector and verified that it is indeed pin 13 & 16 that goes to the sender.

Found 2 solder spots on the PCB, inside the speedometer housing that was connected to those 2 pins and added one 220 ohm and one 47 ohm resistor in series across the 2 solder spots.

Have put the bike back together and will report back if this makes the fuel gauge more precise than before.

Use at own risk.

PS. When i confirm that it solves the problem, i am going to glue the resistors to the PCB to avoid them shaking loose.
This is the approach I used last week and I'm VERY pleased with the results. Fuel gauge IMHO is working exactly as it should, just the same as my truck/car fuel gauges now. I will note I did add a modifier - I added a little glue to the resistors to the board to make sure they didn't move or bounce around.
 

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Ford those of you that can not find a 260 ohm 1/2w, know that neaither could I, but 2 of these in series and viola

[ame]https://www.amazon.com/NTE-Electronics-HW113-Flameproof-Tolerance/dp/B008UTSZ9G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1520151070&sr=8-1&keywords=1%2F2w+130+ohm[/ame]

I am confused tho because I pulled my gauge today and it looks like the place you soldered is from ground to ground???
 

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Yesterday i finally was able to test the gauge properly.

Now with the needle hovering just above the red line and the fuel warning light beginning to illuminate i refueled.

Put in 15,5 litres.

So "empty" now means about 4 litres left.

Still a bit early to warn me when i have 20% left i think.
 

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Was out riding yesterday and the fuel light came on.(did the diode a while back) I was passing a gas station so I stopped and was able to put in right at 4 gallons. So that would leave me a gallon and a half so to speak to find the nearest gas pump.


Does that sound about right???
 

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Was out riding yesterday and the fuel light came on.(did the diode a while back) I was passing a gas station so I stopped and was able to put in right at 4 gallons. So that would leave me a gallon and a half so to speak to find the nearest gas pump.


Does that sound about right???
Yep - as long as you weren't riding like you stole it, it means you have around 50-60 miles until it's bone dry. My fuel gauge gets close to E (post-260Ω resistor mod) with around 1.5 gallons in the tank as well. If I push it, I can get it right to E and still have half a gallon before the light comes on.
 

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Was out riding yesterday and the fuel light came on.(did the diode a while back) I was passing a gas station so I stopped and was able to put in right at 4 gallons. So that would leave me a gallon and a half so to speak to find the nearest gas pump.


Does that sound about right???
Agreed, that sounds about right. I usually tend to fill up not long after the low fuel lamp lights up, and my typical fill is between 4.0 to 4.25 gals. My light comes on usually when I reach 165 - 175 miles on that tankful. I have pushed it to a little over 200 miles on a tankful, and figure I could reach maybe 220 if I had to, but I've never pushed it that far. Not good to let your fuel run so low that the fuel pump runs dry, or so they say.
 

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I’ve had my 2007 vn900 for two years now , red fuel lights never come on ?. The other day I let fuel gauge go into the red and it still never came on ?.is this normal,when does fuel light come on,what’s the best way to check it .
Ride safe


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