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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Fuel woes from sitting 4 yrs..

I knew when I bought this 05 VN1500 (for $700) that it had been sitting in garage for 4 yrs, but didn't expect it to be this bad. I started with removing tank & pump, and as you can see there's not much salvageable. Pump is locked and corroded, filter is crusty & corroded, and I'm fairly certain injectors will be the same. Never let them sit this long! :\ Guess I need to clean tank, find a pump & new filter, and prolly injectors too.. What do you think? Injectors rebuild-able?
Service manual available anywhere?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks! I thought so too.. Considering it includes hard bags, backrest with luggage rack & windshield, I took a chance. So far, Fuel pump I got off ebay for $16.22, injectors with manifold for $21.75. Now I just have to furnish filter, a clamp or 2 and my time. Oh, and a new battery.. Hopefully riding soon :)
 

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Stupid question,but did you turn it over to make sure the cylinders aren't rusted tight? Around here, we get such wild temperaure swings form one day to the next in the winter that condensation can build up in cylinders and pit cylinder walls. I always spray my cylinders with fogging oil in the fall when I store it. Some guys drain their tanks and spray the inside of them with fogging oil as well. I might try that this winter as i usually store it with a full tank and fuel stabilizer, but then I have to drain it in the spring and fool around with all that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh, yeah.. First thing when I got it home, hooked up jumper cable & spun it. Then pulled cover off throttle body, give it a squirt of gas, and it started but wouldn't keep running. Once I took it apart, it's obvious WHY it wouldn't run :\
 

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Well, I told you it was a stupid question, but I had to ask. I'm the guy who looks for his sunglasses for 10 minutes while they're perched on top of his head, so....
 

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Do yourself a favor and don't just clean the tank, but seal it as well.

That tank looks to be in great shape compared to a couple I have "rehabbed" at the shop.

I prefer the POR-15 products over the others... I have seen other brand tank sealers actually peel off the tank walls and make problems worse.

Here's how I would handle this if it were mine, with the POR kit...

1: Drain fuel, flush tank (water is fine), drain, flush tank again...
2: Plug all holes (vents, etc). I use cheap vacuum caps from an auto parts store
3: Toss it a handful of small nuts, bolts, screws, etc. Add 1/2 of the bottle of degreaser and an equal part of water. Shake (well, slosh) for at least 2 hours in all directions. Side to side, front to back, on one side, then the other, even upside down. The longer you work this, the better your end result will be. Pro tip: Count the number of pieces you put in to make sure they all come back out. Also, make sure they will all stick to a magnet, and have one of those magnet-on-a-stick things handy. I use both a stick magnet and a magnet on a string.
4: Drain and save cleaning fluid. I filter it through a coffee filter to remove the crud from it.
5: Inspect the tank... does it need another round? If so, pour cleaner back in and go for round 2...
6: After the rust is gone to your satisfaction, remove all the nuts and bolts, and thoroughly flush the tank with clean water. I usually tip the tank to one end to make gathering the nuts and bolts easier.
7: Using the other half of the cleaner, wash the tank again. No nuts and bolts this time, just removing any last residue that might interfere with the rest of the process.
7: Dry the tank. There are a lot of tricks for this. Compressed air with a blow gun will help remove most of the water. I also use a heat gun on low along the bottom of the tank to help speed the process. Remember, you're only aiding the drying process, do not overheat the tank. I also will only heat in the "belly" or underside of the tank to avoid any possible risk of paint damage from heat. The package instructions say the tank doesn't need to be "bone dry", but I have found it works better if you do. A standard hair dryer will work as well to aid drying the tank.
8: Once thoroughly dry, add the acid wash or metal prep included with the kit. slosh around for at least an hour, again making sure you get every bit of the inside several times.
9: Drain the acid, wash the tank out thoroughly. Dry the tank completely. The sealer does not like a damp tank.
10: Remove your gas cap and fuel pump, and petcock. Have duct tape ready. Pick one spot to pour in and seal the others with duct tape.
11: Add the sealer, and tape off the hole. SLOWLY move the tank around to get the sealer to coat the entire tank. take an hour or more and let it coat 2 or 3 times. The typical kit for a motorcycle only has an 8oz can of sealer, and it's pretty thick. It'll take a while to move around and coat everything, especially once you're at the last stages and most has been spread out.
12: The kit says to drain the excess sealer from the tank. One problem... there's no practical way to do that. You have a couple choices... Siphon a small amount out from the tank using a straw or similar, or just not worry about it and either stand the tank up on it's end or lay it flat and let the excess puddle into the belly on each side. I personally stand the tank up on the rear end and let the excess puddle to that very rear section of the tank.
13: Give the tank an hour or two to get tacky inside and clean your vent lines out with pipe cleaners. At this time you can also remove your tape from the various holes and ports. Also make sure all bolt threads are clear of the sealer. Once it dries, you won't be happy trying to get it out.
14: Let the tank sit a minimum of 96 hours before adding fuel. Yes, 4 whole days. The sealer needs that time to fully and properly cure.

A couple other tips...
Use a funnel when pouring all the goodies beginning with the acid wash or metal prep. Those chemicals can trash a paint job in a hurry, so if anything gets on your paint, wipe it off immediately. This includes the sealer. The sealer, if it dries on your paint, will be like peeling a part of the tank itself apart. The prep work is the key to a good job. Don't shortcut anything.

Working at the shop, we had a Boulevard come in with a similar condition as yours, except the tank was in much worse condition. During the initial rinsing, nickle and dime size pieces of scale were coming out of the tank. We saved that tank with the POR kit.

In better news, that is still a really nice bike for the money. Makes me wish I could find something like that locally and take the better half for a ride...
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks for the suggestions, but I had pretty much already arrived there, thru reading online. I'm using a Citrus based cleaner to do the tank, and should be just fine, replacing everything else, including the lines.. Can't wait to take it for a cruise. but after I do, I have a Barnett clutch diaphragm to install. :) And then to the dark side with a 175/60R16 FORMOZA tire for the rear ;)

Thanks for the info and tips, Will update as I work thru this :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
It's ALIVE! :)
Cleaning tank went well, replaced screen, pump, filter and it started first try, but it didn't want to keep running. So I tried injector cleaner to no avail, and ended up doing exactly what I said.. Had to replace injectors & pressure regulator. That was kind of a chore, but not really that bad. Whole assembly comes out with just 3 screws, tho an impact driver is needed to loosen those screws. Unplug injectors and hose, lift straight up. The setup i got from ebay was perfect, other than I had change pressure regulator housing due to a shorter hose bib.. shrug.. No big deal, coulda been worse.. Anyway threw tank on, plugged in the hose. Hit the starter ... What do ya know? She runs and idles and am excited to finish this job, and get some riding time on this fuel injected hot rod :) lol.. Can't run as good as my 01 carb model.. If it does I'll be shocked.. I gotta do something about those pipes.. they're just too LOUD! :)
 

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... i usually store it with a full tank and fuel stabilizer, but then I have to drain it in the spring and fool around with all that.
If you put in gas stabilizer why would you drain the gas come spring?

I stabilize the fuel and the bike sits 5 months, give or take. Always starts right up and runs/drives fine on that gas.
 

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If you put in gas stabilizer why would you drain the gas come spring?

I stabilize the fuel and the bike sits 5 months, give or take. Always starts right up and runs/drives fine on that gas.
because here it's more like 7 months, and I just use it in the lawn mower.
 

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Hard to imagine it would be much longer storage time than Minnesota but I guess it depends how soon you pack it up and break it out. I'm usually right down to the wire on both ends. Particularly put-up time though.
 

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About five years ago I put StaBil in the tank in October and topped it off, ran it through the carbs and fuel filter, and shut it down for the winter. In the spring I fired it up, it ran pretty rough and even witb Seafoam didn't smooth out. I took it apart, and discovered a bunch of rubberized and jellied fuel in the carb, so I had to take it apart and clean it and replace the fuel filter. It was probably just old gas they sold me to begin with or it otherwise was bad, as I had never had it happen before. But it as a pain in the arse so since then I just replace the gas in the spring and remember to drain the carb before I put it up.
 
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