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Just this week I started hearing some noise coming from my front wheel area. It almost sounds like a rubbing/whurring/metallic sound and it becomes louder as I accelerate. Nothing appears to be wearing, as the tire is fine and I see no other wear on the metal. While I had some noise in this front area in the past, (which I'm reading is common) it has become much more noticeable this past week. Anyone have any ideas?? Someone suggested it could be a wheel bearing issue? I probably have about 2,000 miles of decent tread left on the front tire as it stands now before I will have to invest in a new one.
 

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You need to lift the bike so the front wheel is off the ground. Once you have it up, spin the wheel and put your ear close. See if you can tell if it is the axle or the brake rotor. If you have a mechanical speedometer, it could also be the drive hub for that, which should be on the right side of the axle.

My first thought was actually your brake rotor or the caliper, as in brake shoes dragging. I have had a lot of experience with those issues. Could be just the wheel not being centered between the fork tubes, or could be one of a number of hydraulic issues, ranging from pistons in the caliper not retracting completely to the brake master cylinder return port is plugged. Check it out and get back to us on what you find.
 

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The more I read your post.....the more it sounds like my elusive noise. It comes and goes. Is your noise constant?
 

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Usually if it's a bearing you can stick you finger in the bearing and apply pressure as you rotate inner sleeve. If it doesn't rotate perfectly smooth it's bad. Could also be tire wear noise or brake pad noise if the caliper is sticking.
 

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I had a similar problem a couple of weeks ago. The sound came from the front wheel as if the brakes needed to be changed when stopping. Took the bike to the dealer, brakes were fine. There was a build of material from the brakes that created a ‘film’ on the rotor. The problem was fixed by taking a Scotch-Brite pad and break cleaner and scratching the material off the front rotor. The tech said the OEM brakes were know to cause this problem when you do not apply enough pressure to the font brakes (ride your brakes) because you’re not causing the brakes to bite the rotor – instead the brakes are gliding on the rotor (and that causes the problem). When I got the bike back, the sound was gone and the front brake was working even better. Also change the break setting from 4 to 1. If this sounds like your problem try the Scoth-Brite pad or any other similar pad and the brake cleaner.
 

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Changing the position of the brake lever will only provide an ergonomic change. The distance required to pull before the master cylinder engages is the same in all four of the lever positions. Your rotors were glazed from new shoes not setting in properly. To set in the shoes, ride at around 50 mph and make progressively harder stops using the front brakes ONLY. Then increase speed, doing the same thing. Come to a complete stop each time or almost a complete stop. You should be applying 70% of your brake force at the front, the rears really don't even need to be used for most braking.

If you have material on the rotors, this will not cause brake drag, it will decrease the braking or grab of the rotors. To fix it, you remove the shoes and rub them on 320 grit sandpaper. Then clean the rotors with brake cleaner, which won't remove all the glazing. You will need to apply the brakes as indicated above to remove this material from the rotors. This could require re-cleaning the pads, depending on the deposits on the rotors.
 
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