Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just got my bike back from the shop. Yay! On the way home, got caught in my first T-storm. Got pounded by rain. It was actually quite nice since it was hot and I had rain gear.

Is it bad for the bike? Should I have found shelter, or is it cool just to keep riding?

2007 Vulcan 900 Custom

Unrelated: My stator was replaced as well as the relay box. Anything I should/can do to help make sure it doesn't happen again? (causes of it happening).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I don't have an answer to your question, but am curious as well. Yesterday the forecast showed storms beginning at 7pm, so I decided to ride since I was to get off work by 4. I figured I had a 3 hour margin for error in case the forecast was wrong. As it turned out, the thunderstorms began around 1pm, and it poured the rest of the day. I tried to time it to ride the 18 miles home in-between the cells, but it was still moderate rain the whole way. Thankfully I had my rain gear at work. First time I've ever ridden in the rain!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I've never ridden my Vulcan in heavy rain, but about a month and a half ago I rode my older Katana home through a rain storm that had cars pulling over. I think they were having a hard time seeing, but with the rainX on my visor and the wind in my face I actually didn't have any visibility issues at all.

So that being said... I had no issues with the Katana other than a really dirty bike when I got home and a chair that needed to be oiled to prevent rust from all the water on the chain.

Chains are not something we have to worry about here (thank god). But I have heard that if you have a hyper charger or similar type air scoop that they can suck in a lot of water. While that could be bad for the engine, I haven't heard anyone complain about it too much.

Maybe someone with experience with a hyper charger could chime in. (mainly because I want one, and need to know the answer to this myself! Lol)

Edited for spelling

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
There are theories bouncing around here that its possible to have a problem with the stator/voltage regulator do to water getting into the plug where the wires plug into the regulator due to water pouring off the front tire directly onto it. I and others put dielectric grease inside the plug to assure that no water and grit can enter the plug and cause a short of some kind. For $1.85 I think its worth it even though I have only been caught in thunder downpours a few times. Can't hurt and the tire basically pressure washes that plug when you ride in the rain which is asking for trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
There are theories bouncing around here that its possible to have a problem with the stator/voltage regulator do to water getting into the plug where the wires plug into the regulator due to water pouring off the front tire directly onto it. I and others put dielectric grease inside the plug to assure that no water and grit can enter the plug and cause a short of some kind. For $1.85 I think its worth it even though I have only been caught in thunder downpours a few times. Can't hurt and the tire basically pressure washes that plug when you ride in the rain which is asking for trouble.
Well, that is something I should do since I just replaced the stator. I don't have a clue where that plug is, but I'll look into it. Luckily my brother is mechanical and might be able to help me out with it. Otherwise I'll just figure it out.

I agree anything I can do to ensure it doesn't get ruined again would be worth $1.85!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
It is a square box (3"x3")with fins on it and located under your radiator and directly behind your front tire.......the plug connector is on the gear shift side of that voltage regulator so just pull the plug connection out, squirt if full of dielectric grease that you can get in a tube at NAPA or most automotive stores, and plug it back in. It will seal nicely, make a perfect connection, and no water or dirt can get in. Takes about 10 seconds but well worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
It is a square box (3"x3")with fins on it and located under your radiator and directly behind your front tire.......the plug connector is on the gear shift side of that voltage regulator so just pull the plug connection out, squirt if full of dielectric grease that you can get in a tube at NAPA or most automotive stores, and plug it back in. It will seal nicely, make a perfect connection, and no water or dirt can get in. Takes about 10 seconds but well worth it.
I'll do that. Thanks for the help! Found a super cheap tube on Amazon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
Riding in the rain is not a problem for you're bike. I do it frequently! I live in central Florida. We get rain almost daily. And I ride almost daily. Its just a mater of getting used to it. And learning a few tips. Do a search about rain in the forum. There are a bunch of threads with tons if tips.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Riding in the rain is not a problem for you're bike. I do it frequently! I live in central Florida. We get rain almost daily. And I ride almost daily. Its just a mater of getting used to it. And learning a few tips. Do a search about rain in the forum. There are a bunch of threads with tons if tips.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
I'll definitely review tips! I thought I was more prepared than I was. I learned...

1) I need a waterproof backpack. A waterproof 'cover' for my backpack isn't sufficient because it doesn't cover my back and tries to slip off.

2) My shoes will get soaked through the bottom, even though I have slip-on covers (they don't cover the bottom). Or maybe the water leaked through the pants.

3) My pants aren't waterproof at all.

4) My jacket is waterproof when I put the liner in it, but my shirt will still get wet if my pants are getting soaked. Maybe the water got under my jacket, or it transferred from my pants to my tucked-in shirt. Not too sure.

5) My gloves aren't waterproof at all. I figured as much. Not a problem unless it is cold.

6) Glad I got a full-face helmet. Visibility was fine in hard rain.

7) I can't start fast. I fishtailed pretty hard once.

8) No sudden movements or I will slide.

9) Cars give me crazy looks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
994 Posts
Riding in the rain means being easier on the brakes and throttle as you now know. The most dangerous part of riding in the rain is the first 20 minutes or so of the rain session. During that time the water mixes with the oils dripped or spilled on the road from the cages and semis, etc. makes for riding in greased owl snot. After the first 20 minutes the road is relatively stable traction wise. Unless you have waterproof boots and or leggings "gators" your feet will be soaked. Water proof gloves like you said unless it's cold not big deal unless you are on a long ride.

Just remember in the heavier rain the cages will see you even less.......
I don't ride in the rain for the heck of it, but I will ride in the rain if I am out and encounter the rain. I always have my rain gear with me. Extra reflective vests or tape is a big help toward being seen.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
994 Posts
But after my bike gets dirty, I get to wash it and dry it and wax it and spend time with it......... :) XXXXXX yeah I know I'm an twisted freak
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Yesterday on the way home from work was the wettest I have ever been on a motorcycle in over 43 years of constant riding. The storms we had here in North Texas were nasty and caused some major flooding.

My Vulcan cruised right through all the water, at times over a foot deep, and I must say that bike performed awesomely. After I got home they had closed all the roads near our house due to flooding. My bike just snickered at all the fuss. The low oil pressure light didn't come on this time like it usually does in rain because I wrapped a little electrical tape around the opening to keep the front tire water out.

Thanks for the info here about the dielectric grease. I need to get that done as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Water is no issue for any motorcycle... at least it shouldn't be...
It shouldn't be but a couple people here have had stator failures immediately following riding in extremely wet conditions. May be a coincidence but sand and water mixed in with an electrical plug can't be good. They had water and grit run out of the plug when they disconnected it and that can bridge a short according to some....whether it did or not nobody will ever know for sure. Personally I dielectric greased mine to avoid the chance. I have also had bikes that had the gauges fog from moisture which also shouldn't happen but did. Every bike seems to be different.
 

·
Living The Dream
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
It shouldn't be but a couple people here have had stator failures immediately following riding in extremely wet conditions. May be a coincidence but sand and water mixed in with an electrical plug can't be good. They had water and grit run out of the plug when they disconnected it and that can bridge a short according to some....whether it did or not nobody will ever know for sure. Personally I dielectric greased mine to avoid the chance. I have also had bikes that had the gauges fog from moisture which also shouldn't happen but did. Every bike seems to be different.
+1 on the dielectric grease, going to have to look at mine. but another option is mud flaps. I have noticed a major difference after putting mine on. The front radiator guard and rectifier guard stay much cleaner now. This has to be a plus when riding in wet conditions too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
After having to make a 12 hour ride home from Missouri, about 10 hours of which was in rain, I ain't skeered no mo'.

But monday night I was riding in and wasn't able to see my handlebars. That were a bit sketchy. If I'd had gas in the car or money in my pocket to PUT gas in the car, I would have taken it instead.

Didn't know soaking that regulator could cause trouble. I'll swing by my office on the way home and rummage through my toolbox, I know I've got some dielectric grease in there.

Rain gear... I keep a set of frog toggs in my saddle bags, along with some sneakers and a change of socks to change into when I reach my destination.

I spray the frog toggs with some waterproofing stuff my boss gets. Um... no gloves, never been big on gloves (I'm not an ATGATT guy either. Save the lecture, no offense. I choose to take the risk knowing the consequences)

My everyday riding boots are my Marine Corps tan hot weather boots issued to me at Parris Island in 2002, replete with dog tag in the left laces.

Coming live, from West, by God, Funroe Louisiana.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
994 Posts
Trip286
.
No one is judging you because of what you do or don't wear. That is the individuals choice, just like the choice to serve in the armed forces or not and the choice of which branch.
.
Thanks for your service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
It amazes me how many people selling their bike on Craig's list say "never ridden in the rain." I have only been riding for 3 years and I have ridden in the rain at least 10 times. Makes for a dirty bike as someone said but I'm not aware of any damage. That is as long as you keep the shinny side up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
After having to make a 12 hour ride home from Missouri, about 10 hours of which was in rain, I ain't skeered no mo'.

But monday night I was riding in and wasn't able to see my handlebars. That were a bit sketchy. If I'd had gas in the car or money in my pocket to PUT gas in the car, I would have taken it instead.

Didn't know soaking that regulator could cause trouble. I'll swing by my office on the way home and rummage through my toolbox, I know I've got some dielectric grease in there.

Rain gear... I keep a set of frog toggs in my saddle bags, along with some sneakers and a change of socks to change into when I reach my destination.

I spray the frog toggs with some waterproofing stuff my boss gets. Um... no gloves, never been big on gloves (I'm not an ATGATT guy either. Save the lecture, no offense. I choose to take the risk knowing the consequences)

My everyday riding boots are my Marine Corps tan hot weather boots issued to me at Parris Island in 2002, replete with dog tag in the left laces.

Coming live, from West, by God, Funroe Louisiana.
How are the frog toggs by the way? ive been looking at getting a set. been caught in the rain 3 times in a month here and getting sick of wet leather.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top