Kawasaki Vulcan Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The other day i had to make my first quick stop on my bike. there is this kind of hidden street intersection in the middle of a blind corner in my town. Most people always forget the turn is there and slam on the breaks to make it. this one guy did just that and came to a screeching stop in front of me. Surprised, i slammed on the breaks and followed the procedure i learned in the MSF course. I stopped within a cars length ahead of me and was in first with the engine running. however i locked one the wheels (I think it was the back). I know because of physics that the back wheel is more prone to sliding expectantly during a quick stop. so my question is how much pressure do you put on the back wheel during a quick stop? and was there anything i did incorrectly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,897 Posts
You seem to have kept it upright, so cant say you did anything wrong. If you know this is a bad intersection, would be good idea to slow a bit approaching it in the future. If you are expecting to have to stop fast, you should be less likely to panic and maintain control easier. Always ride like you have a target on you. Glad it all turned out good for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Ya in hindsight i should have known to slow down at that intersection. especially since traffic was being diverted that why :). as for the back break, is there a technique for quick stop to follow so i don't lock the back wheel. or is this something that comes with experience?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,897 Posts
Experience helps, but if it does lock, you may try letting off easy until it unlocks again then applying more pressure. In my manual for the DL test in Ohio it says not to let off if the rear brake locks as long as you are stable and going straight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,620 Posts
What happened:

Someone slammed on their brakes in front of you.

The result:

You came to a stop without hitting the car, losing control of the bike, or even stalling the engine.

What made you think anything you did wasn't the right thing to do?

We lose fine motor skills when adrenaline kicks in. Military personnel, police officers, and others don't use large, overhand, exaggerated movements to change magazines and service weapons to look like action movie heros, they do it because they know in an adrenaline rushed situation they will NOT have the fine motor skills to perform those tasks, so they practice doing them in the ogre-ish way they'll actually be able to do them in a life or death situation.

Brake using the techniques you've learned, and the next time this happens you'll have the same result. I'm not a fan of doing something different 99% of the time and expecting to do it differently in an emergency. That's why I use both brakes all the time even though there's plenty of braking power in the front alone for most situations. And when some yahoo pulls out in front of me, without thinking I'm on both brakes; because it's what I always do.

In the two closest calls I ever had, one where a commercial truck pulled out of a side street turning right and came all the way into the oncoming lane, blocking both my lane and almost all of the shoulder; and another where a drunk driver in a pickup truck pulled out in front of me then stopped; I locked up the rear brake. My current bike has ABS, but my last one didn't. Adrenaline was rushing, I did what I always do; I hit both brakes. I controlled the bike with countersteering, like I always do, instead of throwing my weight around. And both times I was stopped up-right before a collision. (Well, sort of, I side swiped the commercial truck in the first scenario with my tires on the very edge of the shoulder, but at low speed. Just scraped up my saddlebag. And yes, the truck driver paid for a new saddlebag! Second scenario driver left in a hurry, obviously no contact was made, but he was going the same direction we were and obviously drunk so I made a phone call, and the state troopers caught up with him a few minutes later.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Sounds like you locked up the back brake, which isn't really a huge deal and is ok to ride out. If you lock up the front, you'll go down pretty quick because you won't be able to steer (balance) with the front wheel not turning. Honestly, braking pressure is going to differ from bike to bike, so if you want to perfect your emergency braking, I'd say your best plan is to practice hard stops in a parking lot. Sounds like you kept it all upright and everything, so I'd say that was a success already!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,221 Posts
Locking up the rear tire indicates that you used the incorrect (too much) rear brake pressure....end of story...well sort of.

You know that stopping distance will increase if your tire locks up. BUT!
You stopped your bike upright with plenty of room; so while you used the incorrect amount of pressure for the rear brake; you didn't make a consequential error.

We ALL make errors in our riding.
We ALL can perform better.

Use it as a learning experience and count it as a win.

I should add that tires can get old and hard making them more prone to lose traction. I saw that you are riding a 2000 model 800.
If your tires are more than 4 or 5 years old; you should look into replacing them.

This link shows how to tell when they were made.
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=11

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
The motorcycle class here teaches 90% stopping power to the front, 10% to the rear. That avoids locking up the rear tire while giving you the shortest stopping distance by using both brakes as much as you can.

Other than that, you did everything right. Good job!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
as for the back brake, is there a technique for quick stop to follow so i don't lock the back wheel. or is this something that comes with experience?
Experience helps, but if it does lock, you may try letting off easy until it unlocks again then applying more pressure. In my manual for the DL test in Ohio it says not to let off if the rear brake locks as long as you are stable and going straight.

Good job being able to ride away!
Once the back brake has locked up, hold it there til you stop.:surprise: :serious:
That was the only time I've ever lost an "upright bike" after trying to let the back brake loosen, when the bike wasn't straight
You go from sliding on the bike, to on the ground very quickly
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top